Clayton, California

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For the community in Placer County, see Clayton, Placer County, California. For the former town in Los Angeles County, see Clayton, Los Angeles County, California.
City of Clayton
City
Parts of Clayton as seen from Mt. Diablo in Summer 2005
Parts of Clayton as seen from Mt. Diablo in Summer 2005
Location in Contra Costa County and the state of California
Location in Contra Costa County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°56′28″N 121°56′09″W / 37.94111°N 121.93583°W / 37.94111; -121.93583Coordinates: 37°56′28″N 121°56′09″W / 37.94111°N 121.93583°W / 37.94111; -121.93583
Country  United States
State  California
County Contra Costa
Incorporated March 18, 1964[1]
Government
 • Mayor Julie K. Pierce[2]
 • State Senator Mark DeSaulnier (D)[3]
 • State Assembly Susan Bonilla (D)[4]
 • U. S. Congress George Miller (D)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total 3.836 sq mi (9.935 km2)
 • Land 3.836 sq mi (9.935 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation 394 ft (120 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 10,897
 • Density 2,800/sq mi (1,100/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 94517
Area code(s) 925
FIPS code 06-13882
GNIS feature IDs 277488, 2409474
Website www.ci.clayton.ca.us

Clayton (formerly, Clayton's and Claytonville)[7] is a city in Contra Costa County, California, United States. The population was 10,897 as of the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2), all land.

Clayton is located at the foot of Mt. Diablo State Park.[citation needed]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Clayton has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[8]

History[edit]

In 1857, the town of Clayton was laid out and founded by Joel Henry Clayton (1812–1872) and his two younger brothers. Clayton was born in Bugsworth, now Buxworth, in the United Kingdom, and emigrated to the United States in 1837. After years in other states he settled down with his wife Margaret (1820–1908) at his town at the foot of Mt. Diablo, where he and his family prospered. Clayton was named after Joel Henry Clayton, although only by the flip of a coin. Joel Clayton and Charles Rhine cofounded the town, and each wanted to name it after himself. If Charles had won it would have become Rhinesville, but Joel Clayton won. Joel and his wife Margaret both died in Clayton, and were buried in Live Oak Cemetery in what is now Concord, CA.[9]

Clayton prospered during the coal mining boom in eastern Contra Costa County. The post office opened in 1861.[10] Clayton incorporated in 1964.[10]

On December 7, 2009, it snowed in Clayton and nearby Concord for the first time since the 1970s.[11]

In 2011, the town of Clayton was ranked 83rd on CNNMoney's list of the 100 Best Places to Live.[12]

On September 8, 2013, fire broke out on Mt. Diablo. The fire started at the mercury mine area of Morgan Territory Road. The fire grew fast and threatened homes and livestock. Evacuations were ordered for several areas including Oak Hill Lane and Curry Canyon. The fire was named the Morgan Fire. It took over 1000 firefighters and 8 helicopters/planes to put the fire out. Full containment was announced on September 14, 2013.[citation needed]

Education[edit]

The public schools of which the minors of Clayton attend include: Mt. Diablo Elementary School, Highlands Elementary School, Diablo View Middle School, Pine Hollow Middle School, and Clayton Valley Charter High School.

Public libraries[edit]

The Clayton branch of the Contra Costa County Library system is located in Clayton.[13]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[14] reported that Clayton had a population of 10,897. The population density was 2,840.7 people per square mile (1,096.8/km²). The racial makeup of Clayton was 9,273 (85.1%) White, 146 (1.3%) African American, 34 (0.3%) Native American, 717 (6.6%) Asian, 16 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 234 (2.1%) from other races, and 477 (4.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 982 persons (9.0%).

The Census reported that 10,887 people (99.9% of the population) lived in households, 10 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 4,006 households, out of which 1,455 (36.3%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 2,795 (69.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 301 (7.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 112 (2.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 136 (3.4%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 36 (0.9%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 647 households (16.2%) were made up of individuals and 310 (7.7%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72. There were 3,208 families (80.1% of all households); the average family size was 3.04.

The population was spread out with 2,662 people (24.4%) under the age of 18, 602 people (5.5%) aged 18 to 24, 2,185 people (20.1%) aged 25 to 44, 3,846 people (35.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,602 people (14.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.0 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.

There were 4,086 housing units at an average density of 1,065.2 per square mile (411.3/km²), of which 3,621 (90.4%) were owner-occupied, and 385 (9.6%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.7%; the rental vacancy rate was 3.8%. 9,936 people (91.2% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 951 people (8.7%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 10,762 people, 3,883 households, and 3,207 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,054.6/km² (2,729.3/mi²). There were 3,924 housing units at an average density of 384.5/km² (995.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.95% White, 1.12% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 5.38% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 1.54% from other races, and 3.73% from two or more races. 6.33% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,883 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.6% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.4% were non-families. 13.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 31.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $101,652, and the median income for a family was $107,448. Males had a median income of $77,535 versus $50,279 for females. The per capita income for the city was $42,048. About 1.2% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.

Media[edit]

The city of Clayton is served by the daily newspaper Contra Costa Times published by Bay Area News Group-East Bay (part of the Media News Group, Denver, Colorado), and by the newspaper The Clayton Pioneer.

Clayton is also served by Claycord.com a local news and talk blog covering community news and events.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved March 26, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Clayton City Council". City of Clayton. Retrieved March 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  5. ^ "California's 11th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 9, 2013. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Census". Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Clayton, California
  8. ^ Climate Summary for Clayton, California
  9. ^ "Joel Clayton" from the Clayton Historical Society
  10. ^ a b Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 617. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  11. ^ "Photo from local newstation KTVU Channel 2". My.ktvu.com. 2009-12-07. Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  12. ^ http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2011/snapshots/PL0613882.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ Clayton Library. Contra Costa County Library. Retrieved on April 1, 2010.
  14. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Clayton city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]