Jean-Christophe, Prince Napoléon

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Jean-Christophe
Prince Napoléon
Prince Napoléon.JPG
Head of the House of Bonaparte
Period 3 May 1997 – present
Predecessor Louis, Prince Napoléon
Heir Presumptive Prince Jérôme Napoléon
Full name
Jean Christophe Louis Ferdinand Albéric Napoléon
House House of Bonaparte
Father Prince Charles Napoléon
Mother Princess Béatrice of the Two Sicilies
Born (1986-07-11) 11 July 1986 (age 28)
Saint-Raphaël, Var, France
French Imperial Family
Grandes Armes Impériales (1804-1815)2.svg

HIH The Prince Napoléon
Jeanne-Françoise Napoléon


HIH The Dowager Princess Napoléon

Jean-Christophe, Prince Napoléon[1] (Jean Christophe Louis Ferdinand Albéric Napoléon; born 11 July 1986) is, in the views of some monarchists, Head of the former Imperial House of France and heir of the legacy of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Family background[edit]

Prince Jean-Christophe was born in Saint-Raphaël, Var, France. He is the son of Prince Charles Napoléon and his first wife Princess Béatrice of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, daughter of the late Prince Ferdinand of Bourbon, Duke of Castro, a claimant to Headship of the former Royal House of the Two Sicilies.[1] His parents divorced on 2 May 1989, a couple of months before Jean-Christophe's 3rd birthday.

Jean-Christophe is the great-great-great-great-nephew of Emperor Napoleon I of France (who has no legitimate, direct descendants) through the emperor's younger brother, Jérôme, King of Westphalia. Through his mother he is a descendant of King Louis XV of France and through his great-grandmother princess Clémentine of Belgium he is a descendant of Louis Philippe I, King of the French, who was the last King to rule France, although Emperor Napoleon III would serve as its last monarch.

Prince Napoléon[edit]

Jean-Christophe's grandfather, Louis, Prince Napoléon, died in 1997, stipulating in his will that he wished his 11-year-old grandson Jean-Christophe to succeed him as Head of the Imperial House of France rather than the boy's father, Charles, who had embraced republican principles and re-married without his father's authorization.[2] Despite the dynastic dispute, Jean-Christophe's father has stated that "there will never be conflict" between him and his son over the imperial succession.[3]

Education and career[edit]

Jean-Christophe studied at Lycée Saint Dominique, Neuilly-sur-Seine, from 2001 to 2004, gaining a baccalauréat with honours in the sciences and mathematics. From 2004 to 2006 he studied economics and mathematics at the Institut Privé de Préparation aux Études Supérieures (IPESUP) in Paris. Jean-Christophe joined the HEC School of Management in Paris in 2006 where he spent five years, graduating with an MSc in management.[4]

Jean-Christophe worked and lived in New York City as an investment banking analyst for Morgan Stanley.[4] He is fluent in French, English and Spanish.[4]

Titles and styles[edit]

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b de Badts de Cugnac, Chantal. Coutant de Saisseval, Guy. Le Petit Gotha. Nouvelle Imprimerie Laballery, Paris 2002, pp. 437, 442 (French) ISBN 2-9507974-3-1
  2. ^ Herbert, Susannah (12 March 1997). "Father and son in battle for the Napoléonic succession". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 4 June 2007. 
  3. ^ F. Billaut (16 December 1997). "Guerre de succession chez les Napoléon". Point de Vue: 18–19. 
  4. ^ a b c Jean-Christophe Napoléon. Linkedin profile. Retrieved 15 January 2012.

External links[edit]

Jean-Christophe, Prince Napoléon
Born: 11 July 1986
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Napoléon VI Louis
— TITULAR —
Emperor of the French
3 May 1997 – present
Reason for succession failure:
Empire abolished in 1870
Incumbent
Heir:
Prince Jérôme Napoléon