Luna 15

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Luna 15
Luna 15
Operator Soviet Union
Major contractors GSMZ Lavochkin
Mission type
Launch date 13 July 1969 (1969-07-13) 02:54:42 UTC
Carrier rocket Proton 8K82K + Blok D
Launch site Baikonur Cosmodrome
Mission duration 8 days
Mission highlight Lunar impact
COSPAR ID 1969-058A
Mass 5,600 kg (12,300 lb)
Moon landing
Date 21 July 1969 15:47 UTC
Coordinates 17°N 60°E / 17°N 60°E / 17; 60
Instruments
  • Stereo imaging system
  • Remote arm for sample collection
  • Radiation detector
References: NASA NSSDC Master Catalog

Luna 15 (Ye-8-5 series) was an unmanned space mission of the Soviet Luna programme, also called Lunik 15.

On 21 July 1969, while Apollo 11 astronauts finished the first human moonwalk, Luna 15, an unmanned Soviet spacecraft in lunar orbit at the time, began its descent to the lunar surface. Launched three days before the Apollo 11 mission, it was the third Soviet attempt to return lunar soil back to Earth. The Russian craft crashed into the Moon at 15:50 UT, hours before the scheduled American lift off from the Moon.[1]

Mission[edit]

Luna 15 was capable of studying circumlunar space, the lunar gravitational field, and the chemical composition of lunar rocks. It was also capable of providing lunar surface photography. Luna 15 was placed in an intermediate Earth orbit after launch and was then sent toward the Moon. After a mid-course correction the day after launch, Luna 15 entered lunar orbit at 10:00 UT on 17 July 1969. The spacecraft remained in lunar orbit for two days while controllers checked all on-board systems and performed two orbital manoeuvres.

After completing 86 communications sessions and 52 orbits of the Moon at various inclinations and altitudes, it began its descent. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin had already set foot on the Moon when Luna 15 fired its main retrorocket engine to initiate descent to the surface at 15:47 UT on 21 July 1969. Transmissions ceased four minutes after de-orbit, at a calculated altitude of three kilometres. The spacecraft had probably crashed into the side of a mountain. Impact coordinates were 17° north latitude and 60° east longitude, in Mare Crisium.

An audio recording of the minutes in which British technicians at the radio telescope facility in Jodrell Bank observed Luna 15's descent was first made available to the public on 3 July 2009.[2]

Implications[edit]

In a race to reach the Moon and return to Earth, the parallel missions of Luna 15 and Apollo 11 represented, in many ways, the culmination of the Space Race between the space programs of both the United States and the Soviet Union in the 1960s.[citation needed] The simultaneous missions became one of the first instances of Soviet–American space cooperation: the USSR released Luna 15's flight plan to ensure it would not collide with Apollo 11, though its exact mission was unknown.[2]

References[edit]


Preceded by
Luna 1969C
Luna programme Succeeded by
Cosmos 300

External links[edit]