NOAA-17

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
NOAA-17
NOAA-M before launch.jpg
NOAA-M before launch
Mission type Weather satellite
Operator NOAA
COSPAR ID 2002-032A
SATCAT № 27453
Mission duration 2 years[1]
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft type TIROS-N
Manufacturer Lockheed Martin
Launch mass 1,457 kilograms (3,212 lb)[2]
Power 830 watts[3]
Start of mission
Launch date 24 June 2002, 18:23:04 (2002-06-24UTC18:23:04Z) UTC[4]
Rocket Titan II(23)G Star-37XFP-ISS
Launch site Vandenberg SLC-4W
End of mission
Disposal Decommissioned
Deactivated 10 April 2013 (2013-04-11)[5]
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Sun-synchronous
Semi-major axis 7,187.63 kilometers (4,466.19 mi)
Eccentricity 0.0011757
Perigee 808 kilometers (502 mi)
Apogee 825 kilometers (513 mi)
Inclination 98.31 degrees
Period 101.07 minutes
Epoch 8 December 2013, 12:57:13 UTC[6]

NOAA-17 was a weather forecasting satellite operated by NOAA. It was launched on 24 June 2002, in a sun-synchronous orbit, 824 km above the Earth, orbiting every 101 minutes. It hosted the AMSU, AVHRR and High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HRIS) instruments. The satellite was retired in 2013.

Automatic Picture Transmission frequency was 137.5 MHz.

NOAA-17 was decommissioned on 10 April 2013.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "NOAA 15, 16, 17 (NOAA K, L, M)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "NOAA 17". National Space Science Data Center. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "UCS Satellite Database". Union of Concerned Scientists. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  4. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "NASA Office of Spacecraft Operations, NOAA 17 Spacecraft Status Summary". 
  6. ^ "NOAA 17 Satellite details 2002-032A NORAD 27453". N2YO. 8 December 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2013.