Republic of Ireland national football team – record in major tournaments

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This page covers the record of the Republic of Ireland national football team in the FIFA World Cup and the European Football Championship. In the "Results" section, home results are written before away results. Where the Republic of Ireland only played a team once, (h), (a) and (n) indicate home, away or neutral respectively.

Results[edit]

Qualification[edit]

Tournament Section Placing Results Notes
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Only 4 European teams entered the first World Cup.
Italy 1934 Group 7: 3 teams, 2 qualify 3rd, 1pt/4  Netherlands 2-5 (a)
 Belgium 4-4 (h)
Competed as "Irish Free State". Paddy Moore (v. Belgium) became the first player anywhere to score 4 goals in a World Cup match.
France 1938 Group 2: 2 teams, 1 qualifies Losers  Norway 3-3, 2-3
Brazil 1950 Group 5: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 2nd, 3pts/8  Sweden 1-3, 1-3
 Finland 3-0, 1-1
After 3 qualified teams withdrew, FIFA invited the FAI to compete as a replacement: they declined.[1]
Switzerland 1954 Group 4: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 2nd, 4pts/8  France 3-5, 0-1
 Luxembourg 4-0, 1-0
Sweden 1958 Group 1: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 2nd, 5pts/8  England 1-1, 1-5
 Denmark 2-1, 2-0
Euro 1960, France knockout, must win 3 rounds Lost in preliminary round  Czechoslovakia 2-0, 0-4 This was the only fixture of the preliminary round, but was played after several first-round matches.[2]
Chile 1962 Group 8: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 3rd, 0pts/8  Czechoslovakia 1-3, 1-7
 Scotland 0-3, 1-4
The only qualifying tournament in which the team had a 0% record.
Euro 1964, Spain knockout, must win 3 rounds Lost in Quarter-finals Preliminary:  Iceland 4-2, 1-1
Last 16:  Austria 3-2, 0-0
Quarter-final:  Spain 0-2, 1-5
England 1966 Group 9: 2 teams (Syria withdrew), 1 qualifies Tied; Lost playoff  Spain 1-0, 1-4
Playoff:  Spain 0-1 (n)
Goal difference did not count, so a playoff was played in Stade Colombes, Paris.
Euro 1968, Italy Group 1: 4 teams, 1 goes on to playoff 3rd, 5pts/12  Spain 0-0, 0-2
 Czechoslovakia 0-2, 2-1
 Turkey 2-1, 1-2
Mexico 1970 Group 2: 4 teams, 2 qualify 4th, 1pt/12  Hungary 1-2, 0-4
 Czechoslovakia 1-2, 0-3
 Denmark 1-1, 0-2
Euro 1972, Belgium Group 6: 4 teams, 1 goes on to playoff 4th, 1pt/12  Italy 1-2, 0-3
 Austria 1-4, 0-6
 Sweden 1-1, 0-1
West Germany 1974 Group 9: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 2nd, 3pts/8  Soviet Union 1-2, 0-1
 France 2-1, 1-1
Euro 1976, Yugoslavia Group 6: 4 teams, 1 goes on to playoff 2nd, 7pts/12  Soviet Union 3-0, 1-2
 Turkey 4-0, 1-1
 Switzerland 2-1, 0-1
Don Givens scored all 7 goals in the wins over USSR and Turkey.
Argentina 1978 Group 5: 3 teams, 1 qualifies 3rd, 3pts/8  France 1-0, 0-2
 Bulgaria 0-0, 1-2
Euro 1980, Italy Group 1: 5 teams, 1 qualifies 3rd, 7pts/16  England 1-1, 0-2
 Northern Ireland 0-0, 0-1
 Bulgaria 3-0, 0-1
 Denmark 2-0, 3-3
The first-ever matches against Northern Ireland.
Spain 1982 Group 2: 5 teams, 2 qualify 3rd, 10pts/16  Belgium 1-1, 0-1
 France 3-2, 0-2
 Netherlands 2-1, 2-2
 Cyprus 6-0, 3-2
Lost on goal difference to France in a tough and tight group. Fans lamented some controversial refereeing decisions[3]
Euro 1984, France Group 7: 5 teams, 1 qualifies 3rd, 9pts/16  Netherlands 2-3, 1-2
 Spain 3-3, 0-2
 Iceland 2-0, 3-0
 Malta 8-0, 1-0
8-0 v. Malta remains the team's record victory.
Mexico 1986 Group 6: 5 teams, 2 qualify 4th, 6pts/16  Denmark 1-4, 0-3
 Soviet Union 1-0, 0-2
 Switzerland 3-0, 0-0
 Norway 0-0, 0-1
The last League of Ireland player to play a competitive match for the senior team was Pat Byrne of Shamrock Rovers against Denmark in November 1985.
Euro 1988, West Germany Group 7: 5 teams, 1 qualifies 1st, 11pts/16
QUALIFIED
 Bulgaria 2-0, 1-2
 Belgium 0-0, 2-2
 Scotland 0-0, 1-0
 Luxembourg 2-1, 2-0
Qualified with the help of a surprise[4] 1-0 win for Scotland in Bulgaria in the last match.
Italy 1990 Group 6: 5 teams, 2 qualify 2nd, 12pts/16
QUALIFIED
 Spain 1-0, 0-2
 Hungary 2-0, 0-0
 Northern Ireland 3-0, 0-0
 Malta 2-0, 2-0
Euro 1992, Sweden Group 7: 4 teams, 1 qualifies 2nd, 8pts/12  England 1-1, 1-1
 Poland 0-0, 3-3
 Turkey 5-0, 3-1
The team's first ever unbeaten qualifying series: and yet they didn't progress.
USA 1994 Group 3: 7 teams, 2 qualify 2nd, 18pts/24
QUALIFIED
 Spain 1-3, 0-0
 Denmark 1-1, 0-0
 Northern Ireland 3-0, 1-1
 Lithuania 2-0, 1-0
 Latvia 4-0, 2-0
 Albania 2-0, 2-1
Finished exactly level with Denmark on points and goal difference, only separated by Goals scored.
Euro 1996, England Group 6: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
Six 2nd place teams qualify
Two 2nd place teams have playoff
2nd, 17pts/30
Ranked 8th of 8 runners-up
Lost playoff
 Portugal 1-0, 0-3
 Northern Ireland 1-1, 4-0
 Austria 1-3, 1-3
 Latvia 2-1, 3-0
 Liechtenstein 4-0, 0-0
Playoff:  Netherlands 0-2 (n)
0-0 v. Liechtenstein is remembered[citation needed] as one of the team's worst results of all time.
The playoff was held in Anfield, Liverpool.
France 1998 Group 8: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
One 2nd place team qualifies
Eight 2nd place teams have playoffs
2nd, 18pts/30
Lost playoff
 Romania 1-1, 0-1
 Lithuania 0-0, 2-1
 Macedonia 3-0, 2-3
 Iceland 0-0, 4-2
 Liechtenstein 5-0, 5-0
Playoff:  Belgium 1-1, 1-2
Scraped into the playoffs largely due to Tony Cascarino's 7 goals in 10 games.
5-0 v. Liechtenstein is the team's record away win.
Euro 2000, Netherlands & Belgium Group 8 6 teams, 1 qualifies
One 2nd place team qualifies
Eight 2nd place teams have playoffs
2nd, 16pts/24
Lost playoff
 Yugoslavia 2-1, 0-1
 Croatia 2-0, 0-1
 Macedonia 1-0, 1-1
 Malta 5-0, 3-2
Playoff:  Turkey 1-1, 0-0
(Turkey won on away goals)
The FAI originally cancelled the home match against Yugoslavia, after the government refused entry visas to the opposing team purportedly due to the NATO assault on Yugoslavia[5] (although Ireland is not a member of NATO.)
South Korea & Japan 2002 Group 2: 7 teams, 1 qualifies, 2nd gets a playoff 2nd, 24pts/30
Won playoff
QUALIFIED
 Portugal 1-1, 1-1
 Netherlands 1-0, 2-2
 Estonia 2-0, 2-0
 Cyprus 4-0, 4-0
 Andorra 3-1, 3-0
Playoff:  Iran 2-0, 0-1
Of the 25 goals scored in qualifying, only 4 were scored by strikers: 2 by Robbie Keane, 1 by David Connolly and 1 by Niall Quinn.
Euro 2004, Portugal Group 10: 5 teams, 1 qualifies, 2nd gets a playoff 3rd, 11pts/24  Switzerland 1-2, 0-2
 Russia 1-1, 2-4
 Albania 2-1, 0-0
 Georgia 2-0, 2-1
Germany 2006 Group 4: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
Two 2nd place teams qualify
Six 2nd place teams have a playoff
4th, 17pts/30  France 0-1, 0-0
 Switzerland 0-0, 1-1
 Israel 2-2, 1-1
 Cyprus 3-0, 1-0
 Faroe Islands 2-0, 2-0
Apart from the Republic of Ireland's loss to France, the top 4 teams drew all matches against each other, and won against the other two.
Euro 2008, Switzerland & Austria Group D: 7 teams, 2 qualify 3rd, 17pts/36  Czech Republic 1-1, 0-1
 Germany 0-0, 0-1
 Slovakia 1-0, 2-2
 Wales 1-0, 2-2
 Cyprus 1-1, 2-5
 San Marino 5-0, 2-1
After losing to Cyprus, the Republic of Ireland fell below Northern Ireland in the FIFA World Rankings for the first time since they began in 1992.[6]
Robbie Keane scored a hat-trick against San Marino, in the last soccer international played at Lansdowne Road prior to redevelopment.
The first qualifying campaign since the 1986 World Cup where the Republic of Ireland were eliminated before their last game.
South Africa 2010 Group 8: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
Eight of nine runners-up get a playoff
2nd, 18pts/30
Ranked 8th of 9 runners-up
Lost playoff
 Italy 2-2, 1-1
 Bulgaria 1-1, 1-1
 Cyprus 1-0, 2-1
 Montenegro 0-0, 0-0
 Georgia 2-1, 2-1
Playoff:  France 0-1, 1-1
(away leg went to extra time)
This was Montenegro's first major tournament.
The Georgia away tie was played at a neutral venue in Mainz, Germany due to the 2008 South Ossetia war.
France's Thierry Henry's handball stirred international controversy after the move set up William Gallas to score in extra-time of the second leg of the playoff; the referee did not notice and allowed the goal to stand, leading to widespread media controversy, protests at the French embassy in Dublin and comments from senior government officials from both countries.[7][8][9]
Euro 2012, Poland & Ukraine Group B: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
Best runner-up qualifies
The other 8 runners-up get a playoff
2nd, 21pts/30
Won playoff
QUALIFIED
 Russia 2-3, 0-0
 Slovakia 0-0, 1-1
 Macedonia 2-1, 2-0
 Armenia 2-1, 1-0
 Andorra 3-1, 2-0
Playoff:  Estonia 1-1, 4-0
The first games at the new Aviva Stadium.
Brazil 2014 Group C: 6 teams, 1 qualifies
Eight of nine runners-up get a playoff
4th, 14pts/30  Germany 1-6, 0-3
 Sweden 1-2, 0-0
 Austria 2-2, 0-1
 Kazakhstan 3-1, 2-1
 Faroe Islands 3-0, 4-1
Euro 2016, France Group D: 6 teams, top two qualify
Best third-placed team qualifies
The other 8 third-placed teams get a playoff
In progress
Currently 1st, 3pts/3
 Germany np, np
 Poland np, np
 Scotland np, np
 Georgia np, 2-1
 Gibraltar np, np
np = not yet played

Finals tournaments[edit]

Summer Olympics 1924, Paris[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
First
Round
May 28 Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir,
Colombes
Republic of Ireland Irish Free State 1
 Bulgaria 0
(Duncan 75')
Quarter-final June 2 Stade de Paris,
Paris
 Netherlands 2
Republic of Ireland Irish Free State 1
(a.e.t.)
(Formenoy 7' 104'; Ghent 33')

Euro 1988[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
Group
Game
1
June 12 Neckarstadion,
Stuttgart
 England 0
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Houghton 6')
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Chris Hughton, Mick McCarthy, Kevin Moran;
Ray Houghton, Ronnie Whelan, Paul McGrath, Tony Galvin (sub Kevin Sheedy 76');
Frank Stapleton (c.) (sub Niall Quinn 63'), John Aldridge.
Houghton's goal was a rare header. The team spent most of the rest of the game defending the lead.[10]
Group
Game
2
June 15 Niedersachsenstadion,
Hannover
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Whelan 38') Soviet Union 1
(Protasov 74')
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Chris Hughton, Mick McCarthy, Kevin Moran; Ray Houghton, Ronnie Whelan, Tony Galvin, Kevin Sheedy; Frank Stapleton (c.) (Tony Cascarino 80'), John Aldridge. Whelan's goal was a spectacular overhead volley from a McCarthy throw-in.[11] Protasov nutmegged Bonner for the equaliser.[12]
Group
Game
3
June 18 Parkstadion,
Gelsenkirchen
 Republic of Ireland 0
 Netherlands 1
(Kieft 82')
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris (Kevin Sheedy 45'), Chris Hughton, Mick McCarthy, Kevin Moran; Ray Houghton, Ronnie Whelan, Paul McGrath, Tony Galvin; Frank Stapleton (c.) (Tony Cascarino 82'), John Aldridge. Substitute Kieft's header was going well wide but bounced with severe spin into the net.[13]

World Cup Italia 90[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
Group
Game
1
June 11 Stadio Sant'Elia,
Cagliari
 England 1
(Lineker 8')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Sheedy 73')
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Steve Staunton, Mick McCarthy (c.),
Kevin Moran; Paul McGrath, Ray Houghton, Kevin Sheedy, Andy Townsend;
John Aldridge (Alan McLoughlin 64'), Tony Cascarino.
Nine of the players who represented the Republic of Ireland in this game were born in the United Kingdom.
Group
Game
2
June 17 Stadio Della Favorita,
Palermo
 Republic of Ireland 0
 Egypt 0
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Steve Staunton, Mick McCarthy (c.),
Kevin Moran; Paul McGrath, Ray Houghton,
Kevin Sheedy (Tony Cascarino 62'), Andy Townsend; Niall Quinn, John Aldridge (Ronnie Whelan 62').
First time Ireland played a CAF team competitively.
Group
Game
3
June 21 Stadio Della Favorita,
Palermo
 Netherlands 1
(Gullit 10')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Quinn 71')
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Steve Staunton, Mick McCarthy (c.),
Kevin Moran; Paul McGrath, Ray Houghton, Kevin Sheedy, Andy Townsend;John Aldridge (Alan McLoughlin 64'),
Tony Cascarino (Niall Quinn 84').
Second
Round
June 25 Stadio Luigi Ferraris,
Genoa
 Republic of Ireland 0
 Romania 0
aet, 5-4 penalties
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Steve Staunton (David O'Leary 94'),
Mick McCarthy (c.), Kevin Moran; Paul McGrath, Ray Houghton, Kevin Sheedy, Andy Townsend;
John Aldridge (Tony Cascarino 22'), Niall Quinn.
Ireland's first penalty shoot-out. Bonner's save from Daniel Timofte in the shootout sent the Irish team through to the quarter-final.
Quarter
Final
June 30 Stadio Olimpico,
Rome
 Italy 1
(Schillaci 38')
 Republic of Ireland 0
Pat Bonner; Chris Morris, Steve Staunton, Mick McCarthy (c.), Kevin Moran;
Paul McGrath, Ray Houghton,
Kevin Sheedy, Andy Townsend; John Aldridge (John Sheridan 78'), Niall Quinn (Tony Cascarino 53').

World Cup USA 94[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
Group
Game
1
June 18 Giants Stadium,
East Rutherford
 Italy 0
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Houghton 11')
Pat Bonner; Denis Irwin, Terry Phelan,
Phil Babb, Paul McGrath; Roy Keane,
Andy Townsend (c.), Ray Houghton (Jason McAteer 68'),
John Sheridan, Steve Staunton; Tommy Coyne (John Aldridge 80')
This 1-0 win was Ireland's first victory in a World Cup Finals match. The match was won by Houghton's early strike, which dipped over the keeper into the net.
Group
Game
2
June 23 Citrus Bowl,
Orlando
 Mexico 2
(Luis García 42' 65')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Aldridge 84')
Pat Bonner; Denis Irwin, Terry Phelan,
Phil Babb, Paul McGrath; Roy Keane,
Andy Townsend (c.), Ray Houghton, John Sheridan,
Steve Staunton (Jason McAteer 66'); Tommy Coyne (John Aldridge 67')
Ireland's first competitive game against a CONCACAF team. This game featured the infamous incident about the officials not allowing John Aldridge to go on as a substitute. Aldridge lost his cool before ultimately coming on and scoring, and Jack Charlton was fined and suspended from the dugout in Ireland's final group match with Norway.
Group
Game
3
June 28 Giants Stadium,
East Rutherford
 Republic of Ireland 0
 Norway 0
Pat Bonner; Gary Kelly, Steve Staunton,
Phil Babb, Paul McGrath; Jason McAteer,
Roy Keane, Andy Townsend (c.) (Ronnie Whelan 75'),
John Sheridan, Ray Houghton; John Aldridge (David Kelly 65').
Second
Round
July 4 Citrus Bowl,
Orlando
 Netherlands 2
(Bergkamp 11', Jonk 41')
 Republic of Ireland 0
Pat Bonner; Gary Kelly, Terry Phelan,
Phil Babb, Paul McGrath; Roy Keane,
Andy Townsend (c.), Ray Houghton, John Sheridan,
Steve Staunton (Jason McAteer 63'); John Aldridge, Tommy Coyne (Tony Cascarino 74').

World Cup Korea-Japan 2002[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
Group
Game
1
June 1 Niigata Stadium Big Swan,
Niigata, Japan
 Cameroon 1
(Mboma 39')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Holland 52') Report
Shay Given; Gary Kelly, Ian Harte (Steven Reid 77'),
Gary Breen, Steve Staunton (c.); Jason McAteer (Steve Finnan 45'),
Matt Holland, Mark Kinsella, Kevin Kilbane,
Damien Duff; Robbie Keane.
Group
Game
2
June 5 Kashima Soccer Stadium,
Kashima, Japan
 Germany 1
(Klose 19')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Keane 90')
Report
Shay Given; Steve Finnan, Ian Harte (Steven Reid 73'),
Gary Breen, Steve Staunton (c.) (Kenny Cunningham 87');
Gary Kelly (Niall Quinn 73'), Matt Holland,
Kevin Kilbane, Mark Kinsella, Damien Duff;
Robbie Keane.
The Republic's first ever competitive match against a German side.
Group
Game
3
June 11 International Stadium,
Yokohama, Japan
 Republic of Ireland 3
(Keane 7', Breen 61', Duff 87')
 Saudi Arabia 0
Report
Shay Given; Steve Finnan, Ian Harte (Niall Quinn 45'),
Gary Breen, Steve Staunton (c.);
Gary Kelly (Jason McAteer 80'), Matt Holland, Mark Kinsella (Lee Carsley 89'), Kevin Kilbane, Damien Duff; Robbie Keane.
This was the first time an Irish player had scored more than one goal in total in the World Cup Finals. Robbie Keane eventually went on to score three goals in the competition. Also the first time Ireland scored more than once in a match at a major tournament.
Second
Round
June 16 Big Bird Stadium,
Suwon, South Korea
 Spain 1
(Morientes 8')
 Republic of Ireland 1
(Keane 90' pen)
aet, lost 3-2 penalties
Report
Shay Given; Steve Finnan, Ian Harte (David Connolly 82'),
Gary Breen, Steve Staunton (c.) (Kenny Cunningham 50');
Gary Kelly (Niall Quinn 55'), Matt Holland,
Mark Kinsella, Kevin Kilbane, Damien Duff; Robbie Keane.
First time Ireland lost a penalty shoot-out

Euro 2012[edit]

Match Date Venue Result Irish Team Notes
Group
Game
1
June 10 Stadion Miejski,
Poznań, Poland
 Republic of Ireland 1 (St Ledger 19')  Croatia 3 (Mandžukić 3' 49', Jelavić 43') Shay Given; John O'Shea, Sean St. Ledger, Richard Dunne, Stephen Ward; Damien Duff, Keith Andrews, Glenn Whelan, Aiden McGeady (Simon Cox 53'); Robbie Keane (c.) (Shane Long 75'), Kevin Doyle (Jonathan Walters 54') First time Ireland lost the opening match of a major tournament. First time Ireland conceded three goals at a major tournament. First time Ireland lost by more than one goal at a UEFA European Championship.
Group
Game
2
June 14 PGE Arena,
Gdańsk, Poland
 Spain 4 (Torres 4', 70', Silva 49', Fabregas 83') vs.  Republic of Ireland 0 Shay Given; John O'Shea, Sean St. Ledger, Richard Dunne, Stephen Ward; Damien Duff (James McClean 76'), Keith Andrews, Glenn Whelan (Paul Green 80'), Aiden McGeady; Simon Cox (Jonathan Walters 46'), Robbie Keane (c.). First time Ireland lost two successive games at a major tournament. First time Ireland conceded four goals at a major tournament. First time eliminated before final group match.
Group
Game
3
June 18 Stadion Miejski,
Poznań, Poland
 Italy 2 (Cassano 35', Balotelli 90') vs.  Republic of Ireland 0 Shay Given; John O'Shea, Sean St. Ledger, Richard Dunne, Stephen Ward; Damien Duff (c.), Keith Andrews, Glenn Whelan, Aiden McGeady (Shane Long 65'); Robbie Keane (Simon Cox 86'), Kevin Doyle (Jonathan Walters 76') First time Ireland lost three consecutive games at a major tournament. Keith Andrews became the first Irish player to be sent off at a major tournament.

All-time records[edit]

As of 14 November 2012

Pld W D L GF GA GD
World Cup qualifying 122 49 36 37 177 149 +28
European Championship qualifying 109 44 32 33 161 128 +33
World Cup finals 13 2 8 3 10 10 0
UEFA Championship finals 6 1 1 4 3 11 -8
Olympic Games 3 1 0 2 3 5 -2
Friendlies and minor competitions 236 98 53 85 329 315 +14
Totals 489 195 130 164 683 618 +65

Note: Olympics data include two games at the 1924 Olympics and one preliminary game prior to the 1948 Olympics.

UEFA countries the Republic of Ireland have never played competitively[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryan, Sean (1997). The Boys in Green: the FAI international story. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing. p. 60. ISBN 1-85158-939-2. 
  2. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 75. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  3. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. pp. 115–6. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  4. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 141. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  5. ^ "Sport: Ireland fined £25,000 for cancelled Yugoslavia match". RTÉ News. 17 June 1999. 
  6. ^ BBC article on Northern Ireland's Ranking
  7. ^ Scott, Matt (November 20, 2009). "Thierry Henry's handball puts goalline referees on Fifa's World Cup agenda". The Guardian (London). Retrieved May 22, 2010. 
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ [2]
  10. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 175. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  11. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 175. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  12. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 176. ISBN 1-900110-06-7. 
  13. ^ Byrne, Peter (1996). Football Association of Ireland: 75 years. Dublin: Sportsworld. p. 176. ISBN 1-900110-06-7.