Rowland Hughes

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Rowland Hughes (1896–1957) was a director of the United States' Office of Management and Budget from April 16, 1954 until April 1, 1956. Hughes, known for his distinctive black eye patch, was called "the logical man" in a 1956 Time Magazine cover story.[1]

Hughes was born in Oakhurst, New Jersey, and attended Brown University. After graduating from college in 1917 he went to work for the National City Bank of New York. For several years he was assigned to various overseas branches of the Bank, but returned to the Bank’s headquarters in New York City in 1927 where he eventually became vice president.

In April 1953 Hughes was appointed deputy director of the Bureau of the Budget.[2] He became Director of the Bureau in April 1954 following the resignation of Joseph M. Dodge. As Director, Hughes was responsible for preparing the national budget of the U.S. government. Due to his efforts the 1956 budget produced a surplus. This was the first balanced budget of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's administration.

Hughes retired from government service in April 1956 and died of arteriosclerosis on April 2, 1957, in San Francisco, California.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Federal Records Division, National Archives and Records Administration. United States Government Organization Manual, 1955–1956. Washington, D.C., Government Printing Office. 1955 -1956. p. 63
  3. ^ Staff. "ROWLAND HUGHES, U.S. EX-AIDE, DIES; Director of Budget 1954 to 1955. Had Been Executive of National City Bank", The New York Times, April 4, 1957. Accessed December 16, 2012. "Mr. Hughes was born in Oakhurst, N. J., March 28, 1896, the son of Richard-Roberts Hughes, a. contractor, and Annie Van Note Hughes."

External links[edit]

  • [2] Papers of Rowland R. Hughes, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library
Political offices
Preceded by
Joseph Dodge
Director of the Office of Management and Budget
Served under: Dwight D. Eisenhower

April 16, 1954 – April 1, 1956
Succeeded by
Percival Brundage