Samuel L. Powers

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Samuel Leland Powers
Samuel Leland Powers.png
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 11th & 12th district
In office
March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1905
Preceded by Charles F. Sprague (11th)
William C. Lovering (12th)
Succeeded by John Andrew Sullivan (11th)
John W. Weeks (12th)
President of the
Newton, Massachusetts City Council
Member of the
Newton, Massachusetts City Council
Delegate to the 1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[1]
In office
June 6, 1917 – August 13, 1919
Personal details
Born Cornish, New Hampshire
Died Newton, Massachusetts
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Eva C. Crowell[2]
Children Leland Powers (born July 1, 1890)[2][3]
Alma mater Dartmouth
Profession Attorney[4]
Religion Unitarian[3]
Signature
Image of Samuel Leland Powers from The Book of Boston: Fifty Years' Recollections of the New England Metropolis By Edwin Monroe Bacon Published by Book of Boston Co., 1916. Page 405

Samuel Leland Powers (October 26, 1848 – November 30, 1929) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts.

Early life and education[edit]

Powers was born in Cornish, New Hampshire on October 26, 1848. He attended Kimball Union Academy and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1874. Powers studied law at the University of the City of New York Law School, and also in Worcester, Massachusetts. He was admitted to the bar in Worcester County in November, 1875[4] and at that time commenced practice in Boston, and moved to Newton.[5]

Powers was a member of the Newton City Council, also serving as its president. Powers was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1905). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1904. He served as one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1905 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against Charles Swayne, judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida.

He then resumed the practice of law in Boston, became a trustee of Dartmouth College 1905-1915, was a member of the Massachusetts Board of Education in 1915-1919, served in the State militia for ten years.

1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[edit]

In 1916 the Massachusetts legislature and electorate approved a calling of a Constitutional Convention.[6] In May 1917, Powers was elected to serve as a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of 1917, representing the Massachusetts Thirteenth Congressional District.[7]

Powers was a member of the University, Exchange, Newton and Atlantic Conference Clubs, among others and was the president of the Boston Art Club.[5] and was a trustee of the board of public control for the operation of the Boston Elevated Railway 1918-1928, serving as chairman 1923-1928.

Death and burial[edit]

Powers died in Newton on November 30, 1929. His interment was in Newton Cemetery in Newton Center.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1919), A Souvenir of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, Stoughton, MA: A. M. (Arthur Milnor) Bridgman, p. 85. 
  2. ^ a b Eliot, Samuel Atkins (1909), Biographical History of Massachusetts: Biographies and Autobiographies of the Leading Men in the State Vol. 1, Boston, Massachusetts: Massachusetts Biographical Society (Printed by The Plimpton Press, Norwood, MA 
  3. ^ a b Bacon, Edwin Monroe (1892), Boston of To-Day: A Glance at Its History and Characteristics, Boston, Ma: Post Publishing Company, p. 356. 
  4. ^ a b Bacon, Edwin Monroe (1892), Boston of To-Day: A Glance at Its History and Characteristics, Boston, Ma: Post Publishing Company, p. 355. 
  5. ^ a b Bacon, Edwin Monroe (1916), The Book of Boston: Fifty Years' Recollections of the New England Metropolis, Boston, MA: Book of Boston Co., (printed by The Pilgrim Press), p. 405 
  6. ^ Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, pp. 7–8. 
  7. ^ Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, p. 8. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Charles F. Sprague
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903
Succeeded by
John Andrew Sullivan
Preceded by
William C. Lovering
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 12th congressional district

March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1905
Succeeded by
John W. Weeks
Political offices
Preceded by
President of the
Newton, Massachusetts City Council

Succeeded by
Preceded by
Member of the
Newton, Massachusetts City Council

Succeeded by