John J. Douglass

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John J. Douglass
John Joseph Douglass.png
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 10th district
In office
March 4, 1925 – March 3, 1933
Preceded by Peter F. Tague
Succeeded by John P. Higgins
Member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts' 11th district
In office
March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935
Preceded by George H. Tinkham
Succeeded by John P. Higgins
Commissioner of Boston Penal Institutions
Delegate to the
1932 Democratic National Convention
Delegate to the
1928 Democratic National Convention
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
In office
1899–1900
Delegate to the
1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[1]
In office
June 6, 1917[2] – August 13, 1919[3]
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
Second Suffolk District
Ward 2 Boston[4]
In office
1906–1906
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
In office
1913–1913
Personal details
Born John Joseph Douglass
February 9, 1873
East Boston, Massachusetts
Died April 5, 1939 (aged 65)
West Roxbury, Massachusetts
Resting place St. Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury, Massachusetts
Alma mater Boston College, Georgetown University

John Joseph Douglass (February 9, 1873 – April 5, 1939) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts.

Life and career[edit]

He was born in East Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, on February 9, 1873. Douglass graduated from Boston College in 1893 and from the law department of Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., in 1896. He was admitted to the bar in 1897 and commenced practice in Boston.

Douglass was a member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1899, 1900, 1906, and again in 1913. Douglass was delegate to the Massachusetts constitutional convention in 1917 and 1918; author and playwright; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1928 and 1932. Douglass was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-ninth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1925 – January 3, 1935); chairman, House Committee on Education (Seventy-second and Seventy-third Congresses). Douglass was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1934. Douglass resumed the practice of law; served as commissioner of penal institutions of Boston from 1935 until his death in West Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1939.

Douglass is buried in St. Joseph Cemetery.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, p. 11. 
  2. ^ Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, pp. 7, 11. 
  3. ^ Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers, 1919, pp. 865, 971. 
  4. ^ Bridgman, A. M. (1906), A Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators Volume XV, Stoughton, MA: A. M. Bridgeman, p. 167. 
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Peter F. Tague
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 10th congressional district

March 4, 1925 – March 3, 1933
Succeeded by
George H. Tinkham
(redistricted)
Preceded by
George H. Tinkham
(redistricted)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935
Succeeded by
John P. Higgins
Political offices
Preceded by
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

1899–1900
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
Second Suffolk District
Ward 2 Boston

1906–1906
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

1913–1913
Succeeded by