Talk:Churro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Spain  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Spain, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Spain on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject Argentina (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Argentina, an attempt to expand, improve and standardise the content and structure of articles related to Culture of Argentina. If you would like to participate, you can improve Churro, or sign up and contribute to a wider array of articles like those on our to do list.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Cuba (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Cuba, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Cuba related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Chile  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Chile, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Chile on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mexico (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Mexico, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Mexico on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Breakfast (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Breakfast, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of breakfast-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

A conversation[edit]

Some research indicates that many of those very familiar with US culture are surprised to discover that there is such as a thing as a churro and are perplexed as to why something so familiar to many has succeeded in escaping their notice over many years.

A parallel example is the UK ignorance of a US staple called the biscuit.

Brits are widely aware that the Americans use the word cookie to describe what Brits call a biscuit.

In fact most Brits (who don't tend to call themselves Brits unless they are ex-pats) tend to think of cookies as a particular kind of biscuit (one with a rough surface texture).

But the thing which Americans call a biscuit usually leaves Brits utterly confused.

Not because, as an item it is particularly unfamiliar to them (it is so similar to the British scone as to be described as a scone) but the fact that it is served as a 'staple' like potatoes or stuffing on a 'meal dish' would not just seem alien, but would seem almost unthinkable, because Brits tend to believe that they have either already encountered every single aspect of uniquely american culture a million times on TV, or actually directly come into contact with it in the form of a UK import.

But can anyone think of biscuits and gravy ever featuring in a major movie or TV show?

'Biscuits and gravy' sounds to most Brits like 'cookies and gravy', something out of Monty Python, a perverse and anarchic cobination as comical as kippers and custard.

But I'm not sure churros are quite as widespread an indication of 'cultural knowledge balkanisation' as biscuits and gravy.

ericross

Don't ask us. We Spaniards didn't even know there are (mexican) churros in the US. --[[User:|User:]] 04:12, 22 March 2006 (UTC)
Churros are served in many "authentic" Mexican fast food restaurants in the US... IE, chains like "Chevy's Fresh Mex" won't have it, but the neighborhood hole-in-the-wall mexican restaurant will. Quite tasty. Fo0bar 09:25, 18 June 2006 (UTC)
Not to mention every single theme park everywhere.—BassBone (my talk · my contributions) 22:21, 12 August 2006 (UTC)

...churros of the extremes...[edit]

What are "churros of the extremes"!? More detail please! Whatever they are they sound delicious! (Or is this just supposed to mean a really big churro? Which actually sounds kind of nauseating.) Ewlyahoocom 08:32, 4 February 2006 (UTC)

Theme parks[edit]

It's kind of odd the way this article names three theme parks that sell churros, when it seems from my own experience the churros are ubiquitous at American theme parks. And then it quotes a price. Is that supposed to be the current price at Sea World or what? Does this article even need to mention the price? 72.130.129.220 20:20, 13 August 2006 (UTC)

Thanks for pointing this out. I removed the details. Regards, E Asterion u talking to me? 20:29, 13 August 2006 (UTC)


Some points[edit]

I'm spaniard, and... well, to begin with, this article mentions "churro connoisseurs". That's absolutely hilarious. Churros are the most prosaic food I have ever known, it's ridiculous to think that some people dedicate their lives to them. And talking about Andalusian churros, the "calentitos" and "calentitos de papas"... well, I'm andalusian, I have eaten lots of churros, and I never in my life heard any of those two terms. And they sound pretty ridiculous too; that's spanish from Mexico, not from Spain nor Andalusia. It's the kind of trivia that someone who doesn't know a thing about Spanish culture would add.

Hi! I'm mexican and the idea of "churro connoisseurs" sounds ridiculous too. Never heard of any here in México. As for the terms "calentitos" and "calentitos de papas", never heard them either here in México. Cheers. Damn! I want a Churro. Vicco Lizcano 14:52, 28 March 2007 (UTC) (Tell me where I'm wrong)
I agree! In all the many many times I've had churros in Andalucia or Gibraltar, I have never heard them called "calentitos"! According to the Spanish language article, the name is found in Sevilla. Sevilla is not the whole of Andalucia! I have also never come across potato churros? Anyone have any info on these? Saluton (talk) 01:48, 10 August 2008 (UTC)
Also, the churro batter should not contain butter, at least in Spain. It's just water, flour and salt. I'll try to clean that section up a bit. Estradin (talk) 20:07, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

More detail of the ingredients, please[edit]

This article needs information of the type of fatty acids typically used to fry the things. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 85.77.233.1 (talk) 13:38, 11 May 2007 (UTC).

I don't think that's particularly important to the article. In Spain it's just good old fashioned vegetable oil. More information on the recipe however, would be useful... it's basically just deep fried pancake batter. Saluton (talk) 01:56, 10 August 2008 (UTC)
This might be a little late, but before anyone gets funny ideas to edit this article: Churro-dough is more like a choux paste but, according to the esp. wiki(which I would consider the most accurate for this), without eggs, though most people throw them in there(yuk) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.77.239.40 (talk) 18:07, 5 October 2012 (UTC)

Shi-Shis???[edit]

I remember having these in either Italy or France, they sold them on the beach, only they called them something like Shi-Shi. Anyone else know what I'm talking about? They looked exactly like Churros, and they used to cover them in sugar davekeeling 16:04, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

Article's references[edit]

There's currently one reference listed for this article. It comes from the California Churros franchise restaurant's web page on the history of the churro. I find the source to be somewhat not reliable. I suspect that they just set down in writing what they knew to be the popular history of the churro, rather anything based on actual research. I am unable to find any information about this "Charlie Starr" to whom the research is attributed. (I also note that there are a number of churro restaurant web sites, each with their own "history of the churro" web page.) Because of these reasons, and because it is a commercial site, I am tempted to remove this source from the article. However, I did a quick web search, and I was unable to find a good, non-commercial reference to replace it. I still might remove the citation. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ben James Ben (talkcontribs) 02:53, 25 September 2007 (UTC)

Hi there[edit]

You talk about my country and we don't call that thing that way. Porras are knotted and from madrid. In Andalucía we eat churros, long and fat, broken to dip. And the cherrerías do normally close at midday! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.38.52.75 (talk) 23:33, 19 September 2008 (UTC)

Everywhere in Spain people will understand both "churros" and "porras" correctly as churros being the thin and often knotted version and porras being the thicker longer ones. But in many parts of Spain, especially in the south and the Canary Islands if you ask for "churros" you most likely get porras because they are the most popular variation. Both porras and churros are considered "churros" in a broad sense. So basically you can ask for churros or porras anywhere in Spain and they will understand what you are asking for, but in areas where you already know porras are the most popular and sometimes the only choice, you might want to ask for "churros, not porras" if what you are asking for is the thinner variation and want to avoid confusion.

Lastly, I'm Spanish and the article is accurate enough as it is, so to all Spaniards whining about nonsense on the talk page, if you can barely understand English and live in a regional bubble please stick to the Spanish Wikipedia as you are just causing confusion for the sake of it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.203.41.33 (talk) 12:16, 26 September 2013 (UTC)

Rename to "churros"?[edit]

Should this article be renamed to Churros? Mathonius (talk) 20:22, 27 June 2011 (UTC)

No, because the doughnut article is not at the title "doughnuts". Graham87 00:48, 28 June 2011 (UTC)

Origin[edit]

Churros was made by Spanish shepherds, the origin name is for churra sheep — Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.127.211.144 (talk) 01:13, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

About the chinese origin, only available in the English wikipedia, is not logical, beacuse in spain, similar products already existed like the buñuelos (Al-Andalus)[1], centuries before to the trip of the Portuguese, the techniques, including modifying the dough were already known, example the rosquillas. In the hypothetical Chinese case, the churros no are a chinese food, the chinese food are the Youtiao which is not the same as the churros. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Markses (talkcontribs) 00:09, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

buñuelos (Al-Andalus)? Al-Andalus included part of modern day Portugal as well as Spain so if it orginated in Al-Andalus then it should be credited to both unless a place can be identified. Either way there is no clear indication as to which is reponsible so both should be set as origin. Similar products also exist in Portugal such as filhós. The fact the Portuguese sailors made it differently from Youtiao explains why it is different and not exactly the same. Interestingly Churra sheep come from Zamora, which borders Portugal in the north, but in Portugal you can find a few breeds of sheep with Churra in the title, such as Churra Algarvia, Churra Badana, Churra da Terra Quente, Churra do Campo, Churra do Minho and i'm guessing theres many more. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rockysantos (talkcontribs) 17:07, 17 August 2012 (UTC)

In spain churrero work, sure is previous to 1621, the origin is spain is more ancient for own consumption. Rockysantos You can find some document, put that the churros are consumed in portugal century before XIX?

"La primera referencia escrita en España acerca de la profesión de "churrero" data del año 1621, cuando durante el periodo inicial del reinado de Felipe IV un súbdito de la Villa de Madrid nombrado como: Pedro Velasco, del gremio de los alojeros, solicita un aumento de precios en los productos que fabrica. Cabe la posibilidad de que el oficio existiera antes" Matilde Cuevas de la Cruz Juan Miguel Benítez Benítez, (1982), «El oficio de la churrería en Madrid», Madrid, ISBN: 84-50CL761-4-5

The sheep churra no is only from zamora, is from all castilla. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.127.214.220 (talk) 23:46, 28 August 2012 (UTC)

Can you provide that quote in English please, this is the english version of Wikipedia. Also I can't find that book, is the ISBN correct? The Portuguese arrived in China in 1513 and traded many things, this is where they got Churros from. Where were these Churra sheep (that also exist in Portugal) that churros are named after allegedly, being looked after by the shephards(place name, date)? Rockysantos (talk) 11:29, 29 August 2012 (UTC)

Is easy the book is this :

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:tsmmL40QPJsJ:www.madrid.org/edupubli/cgi-bin/WPUB_BD.exe?ACCION%3DRecogerPDF%26CDDEPTNO%3D09%26CDTEXP%3DPU%26CDAEXP%3D1999%26CDNEXP%3D42%26CDDIGITO%3D3%26CDESTADO%3D3%26NMORDEN%3D2+El+oficio+de+la+churrer%C3%ADa+en+Madrid&hl=es&gl=es&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShEK-OO09erPKcwAbOUUsDLY7pmBEr30qAgY0K7C-FpPY5ByktflPwBYP4D_shjWzDnlZwLyw5WsJRdzAzyvE6RVfbaDMkQjGQxfUwlmSJowQPgjQy_mXl0wmkmGZZ1FyY04KEz&sig=AHIEtbSuHHcRDU19uv4auinCHpGLWNuGQA


The information is from deputation of madrid (Janitor of education)

The portuguese arrived a china, very well and? you search documents reals no legends, some document, saying that the Portuguese ate churros century before XX? The response is not. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.127.214.220 (talk) 15:41, 29 August 2012 (UTC) The first written reference in Spain about the profession dates back to 1621, when during the initial period of the reign of Philip IV of a subject named Villa de Madrid: Pedro Velasco, the guild of alojeros, requested a price increase in the products it manufactures. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.127.214.220 (talk) 15:47, 29 August 2012 (UTC)