Talk:Cubism

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Picasso's use of text (JOU)[edit]

Currently, the article says Picasso, through this (Synthetic Cubism) movement, was the first to use text in his artwork (to flatten the space) - how valid is this? I'm having a hard time believing nobody before Picasso used text in artwork and I can't find mention of this anywhere else, not even my university art book, and I would think something like this would be a really major fact. 24.214.205.150 (talk) 13:04, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

Category[edit]

Add "Category:Visual art movements" to article when unprotected. Hyacinth 05:29, 15 Sep 2004tit (UTC)

move it back, i think

Modernism template[edit]

I've added a template feel free to add new articles to it. Stirling Newberry 00:33, 3 Jan 2005 (UTC)

This article needs a lot of help. I put a stub tag on it. Also, the movements of modern art are not linear, so I don't see the benefit in having "preceded by" and "followed by" in the template. [[User:Dystopos|05:10, 13 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Why was this changed?[edit]

Doing a research project on cubism (synthetic cubism specifically). Just wondering why the article was shortened to the little snippet it is now. Or am I missing something? Version with the full article is 13:12, 31 Mar 2005 though there may be a better version before that... I think it should be switched back, but I don't know. I'm not an expert on the subject, it just seems like the article was much more complete.--Quibbles 01:29, 18 May 2005 (UTC)

The changer didn't say why they changed it. I've put it back in and copyedited it. There's still a lot more that could be written about cubism. If your research turns up some material to add, please do so. --sparkit (talk) 04:23, May 18, 2005 (UTC)
Thanks for the change and the edit. This is much closer to what I had in mind for this article. Hopefully I'll have time to add what I find in my research. thanks again.--Quibbles 06:11, 19 May 2005 (UTC)
Wonderful addition to the article, Quibbles! Thanks! --sparkit (talk) 14:09, May 19, 2005 (UTC)tit

yup so thats y cubism is important!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Link re: Marevna's cubist paintings[edit]

There do not seem to be many representations of Marevna's paintings available on the internet; so I suppose one does not want to lose the links that one does find. Two links I left in working order when I originally supplied them, have since ceased to connect; but in both cases I have been able to trace them under a new address, which I have put in the article, tested and again left in woriking order. Hey everyone!

a) In case of Marevna's painting "Landscape with a Thistle", 1969, canvas, oil, 96x130, if the problems recurs, try: www.sovcom.ru/ and, having chosen the English language option in the top left hand corner, go to Help and search there for "Creator": Marevna.

b) Same in the the case of the second link, namely Marevna's portrait of Chaim Soutine, c. 1916/17, at the Erich Lessing Collection website. If it again causes problems, try: www.lessing-photo.com/ and see whether by searching for "Marevna, Maria" it is still possible to trace this image.

c) The link to the Korean site works, though it is a bit slow. A window comes up offering the installation of the Korean language; but it is possible to proceed and view the images without installing the language. The images are not numbered, so one has to count to 16 whilst scrolling down the page.

Portress updated at 02:18, 16 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Just so you all know, the 3rd St. Villager, a free Los Angeles paper, printed this article in their Issue #25 August 2005. JesseW 20:10, 29 August 2005 (UTC)

{{cited}} Diego Rivera was a very famous cubist painter.--71.28.246.73 06:16, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

Impact of Cubism[edit]

The starting sentence states that "usually regarded as the most important and influential art movement since the Italian Renaissance." This is highly debatable, especially when taking into account how much cubism was influenced by impressionism (Cubism is just a further break from the realism that had predominated). Who regards it as the most influential movement? That should definitely be stated along with references. Cubism was made famous by artists like Ferdinand Leger and Pablo Picasso for deipcting an abstract and contorted view of reality similiar to other "realist" painters during the time the descriptions are modified, dark or illustrious variations of the modern world.Epachamo 00:52, 21 April 2006 (UTC)

Cezanne?[edit]

Paul Cezanne's article references his influences on cubists rather extenstively - should he be mentioned here?

I have contributed to the Cézanne article, particularly in reference to his influence on Cubism and 20th C art, and I'd be very happy to have a link to Cezanne in this article. In fact I'll put one in myself! Duncan Smith 16:51, 11 December 2006 (UTC)

Ditto. Cezanne is the FATHER OF CUBISM. Yes, he did it first. And to leave him out of an article about Cubism is the reason why no one should rely on Wikipedia for their information. Pookerella (talk) 02:52, 1 January 2014 (UTC)

Link re: Marevna's cubist paintings[edit]

There do not seem to be many representations of Marevna's paintings available on the internet; so I suppose one does not want to lose the links that one does find. Two links I left in working order when I originally supplied them, have since ceased to connect; but in both cases I have been able to trace them under a new address, which I have put in the article, tested and again left in woriking order. Hey everyone!

a) In case of Marevna's painting "Landscape with a Thistle", 1969, canvas, oil, 96x130, if the problems recurs, try: www.sovcom.ru/ and, having chosen the English language option in the top left hand corner, go to Help and search there for "Creator": Marevna.

b) Same in the the case of the second link, namely Marevna's portrait of Chaim Soutine, c. 1916/17, at the Erich Lessing Collection website. If it again causes problems, try: www.lessing-photo.com/ and see whether by searching for "Marevna, Maria" it is still possible to trace this image.

c) The link to the Korean site works, though it is a bit slow. A window comes up offering the installation of the Korean language; but it is possible to proceed and view the images without installing the language. The images are not numbered, so one has to count to 16 whilst scrolling down the page.

Portress updated at 02:18, 16 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Just so you all know, the 3rd St. Villager, a free Los Angeles paper, printed this article in their Issue #25 August 2005. JesseW 20:10, 29 August 2005 (UTC)

{{cited}} Diego Rivera was a very famous cubist painter.--71.28.246.73 06:16, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

Cubistic architecture[edit]

In Prague there are a few examples of cubistic architecture (the most famous is the house at the black mother of god, where now the museum of czech cubism is locate), shouldn't this unusual aspect of cubism being mentioned? Plch 00:31, 22 June 2006 (UTC) ops, I've just noted the picture, but I don't see anything in the text... Plch

Feel free to add it. :) Jobjörn (Talk | contribs) 01:51, 22 June 2006 (UTC)

I am an art historian, living in Prague (in Nusle), where I see this so-called 'cubist architecture' every day. On the one hand, I love these buildings. But on the other, I find it incredible how people accept this designation of 'cubist' so completely uncritically. I have never heard or read a coherent argument as to what, exactly, makes this architectural style cubist. In fact, it is no more cubist than any other randomly chosen architectural style. I know how dear it is for Czechs to have this claim to fame (despite earlier attempts in 'cubist architecture' in France). But while it is undoubtely aesthetically pleasing, cubist it is not! For quality reasons, and for pedagogical accuracy, I suggest the photos of the cubist buildings be removed. They can certainly remain in the article on Czech cubism - though this entry is in need of expansion and critical attention.

As an architect I would say that the czech cubist architecture is more of a decorative kind than true cubism. Similar to classisism, gothic, Art Noveau etc. Decorative patterns applied to a standard building to folow the current vogue. True cubist buildings, in the philosophy of analytical or synthetic cubism, is rather something in the line of deconstructivism or post-modernism. One of my teachers at architecture school, a true post-modernist, is very fond of cubism. 213.145.169.62 13:05, 28 September 2007 (UTC)

I can't believe[edit]

It was a complete and clearly defined aesthetic.

Why I don't feel convinced? Am I just prejudiced (against cubism) or merely ignorant (in face of a genius)?
6birc, 19:29, 28 June 2006 (UTC)

I agree. (Ignoring the question whether you can agree to a question or not.) Jobjörn (Talk ° contribs) 20:51, 28 June 2006 (UTC)

Merge proposal[edit]

As the two articles proposed, Analytic cubism and Synthetic cubism are both stubs, with little activity, I feel that their purpose may be better served in this article by merging the three under this title. This is only a tentative proposal, but my thinking behind it is that the viewing of all the related information will be easier with the topics together. Martinp23 21:31, 28 November 2006 (UTC) I agree that the three should be merged as soon as possible. As it stands some of the information is conflicting. Daisy2 14:47, 23 August 2007 (UTC)

The 3 Main Types Of Cubism[edit]

There were many types of cubism. The three main ones were these. There is ANALYTICAL CUBISM (1909-1912), SYNTHETIC CUBISM (1912-1919) and ORPHISM CUBISM. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 82.109.143.194 (talk) 17:20, 21 January 2007 (UTC).

As it stands now, there are two articles that link to each other, about two kinds. One of them (on Analytic) starts out saying there are two major branches, the other (Synthetic) starts out saying there are three major branches. Could you recommend a clear, complete, and consistent introductory statement for both? --Sukkoth 10:06, 10 February 2007 (UTC)

Your continued donations keep Wikipedia running! Talk:Cubism From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Contents [hide] 1 Category 2 Modernism template 3 Why was this changed? 4 Link re: Marevna's cubist paintings 5 Impact of Cubism 6 Cezanne? 7 Cubistic architecture 8 I can't believe 9 Merge proposal 10 A merge seems a very good idea 11 The 3 Main Types Of Cubism


[edit] Category Add "Category:Visual art movements" to article when unprotected. Hyacinth 05:29, 15 Sep 2004tit (UTC)

move it back, i think


[edit] Modernism template I've added a template feel free to add new articles to it. Stirling Newberry 00:33, 3 Jan 2005 (UTC)

This article needs a lot of help. I put a stub tag on it. Also, the movements of modern art are not linear, so I don't see the benefit in having "preceded by" and "followed by" in the template. [[User:Dystopos|05:10, 13 Apr 2005 (UTC)

[edit] Why was this changed? Doing a research project on cubism (synthetic cubism specifically). Just wondering why the article was shortened to the little snippet it is now. Or am I missing something? Version with the full article is 13:12, 31 Mar 2005 though there may be a better version before that... I think it should be switched back, but I don't know. I'm not an expert on the subject, it just seems like the article was much more complete.--Quibbles 01:29, 18 May 2005 (UTC)

The changer didn't say why they changed it. I've put it back in and copyedited it. There's still a lot more that could be written about cubism. If your research turns up some material to add, please do so. --sparkit (talk) 04:23, May 18, 2005 (UTC) Thanks for the change and the edit. This is much closer to what I had in mind for this article. Hopefully I'll have time to add what I find in my research. thanks again.--Quibbles 06:11, 19 May 2005 (UTC) Wonderful addition to the article, Quibbles! Thanks! --sparkit (talk) 14:09, May 19, 2005 (UTC)tit

[edit] Link re: Marevna's cubist paintings There do not seem to be many representations of Marevna's paintings available on the internet; so I suppose one does not want to lose the links that one does find. Two links I left in working order when I originally supplied them, have since ceased to connect; but in both cases I have been able to trace them under a new address, which I have put in the article, tested and again left in woriking order. Hey everyone!

a) In case of Marevna's painting "Landscape with a Thistle", 1969, canvas, oil, 96x130, if the problems recurs, try: www.sovcom.ru/ and, having chosen the English language option in the top left hand corner, go to Help and search there for "Creator": Marevna.

b) Same in the the case of the second link, namely Marevna's portrait of Chaim Soutine, c. 1916/17, at the Erich Lessing Collection website. If it again causes problems, try: www.lessing-photo.com/ and see whether by searching for "Marevna, Maria" it is still possible to trace this image.

c) The link to the Korean site works, though it is a bit slow. A window comes up offering the installation of the Korean language; but it is possible to proceed and view the images without installing the language. The images are not numbered, so one has to count to 16 whilst scrolling down the page.

Portress updated at 02:18, 16 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Just so you all know, the 3rd St. Villager, a free Los Angeles paper, printed this article in their Issue #25 August 2005. JesseW 20:10, 29 August 2005 (UTC)

Template:Cited Diego Rivera was a very famous cubist painter.--71.28.246.73 06:16, 27 March 2006 (UTC)


[edit] Impact of Cubism The starting sentence states that "usually regarded as the most important and influential art movement since the Italian Renaissance." This is highly debatable, especially when taking into account how much cubism was influenced by impressionism (Cubism is just a further break from the realism that had predominated). Who regards it as the most influential movement? That should definitely be stated along with references. Epachamo 00:52, 21 April 2006 (UTC)


[edit] Cezanne? Paul Cezanne's article references his influences on cubists rather extenstively - should he be mentioned here?

I have contributed to the Cézanne article, particularly in reference to his influence on Cubism and 20th C art, and I'd be very happy to have a link to Cezanne in this article. In fact I'll put one in myself! Duncan Smith 16:51, 11 December 2006 (UTC)


[edit] Cubistic architecture In Prague there are a few examples of cubistic architecture (the most famous is the house at the black mother of god, where now the museum of czech cubism is locate), shouldn't this unusual aspect of cubism being mentioned? Plch 00:31, 22 June 2006 (UTC) ops, I've just noted the picture, but I don't see anything in the text... Plch

Feel free to add it. :) Jobjörn (Talk | contribs) 01:51, 22 June 2006 (UTC) I am an art historian, living in Prague (in Nusle), where I see this so-called 'cubist architecture' every day. On the one hand, I love these buildings. But on the other, I find it incredible how people accept this designation of 'cubist' so completely uncritically. I have never heard or read a coherent argument as to what, exactly, makes this architectural style cubist. In fact, it is no more cubist than any other randomly chosen architectural style. I know how dear it is for Czechs to have this claim to fame (despite earlier attempts in 'cubist architecture' in France). But while it is undoubtely aesthetically pleasing, cubist it is not! For quality reasons, and for pedagogical accuracy, I suggest the photos of the cubist buildings be removed. They can certainly remain in the article on Czech cubism - though this entry is in need of expansion and critical attention.


[edit] I can't believe It was a complete and clearly defined aesthetic. Why I don't feel convinced? Am I just prejudiced (against cubism) or merely ignorant (in face of a genius)? —6birc, 19:29, 28 June 2006 (UTC)

I agree. (Ignoring the question whether you can agree to a question or not.) Jobjörn (Talk ° contribs) 20:51, 28 June 2006 (UTC)

[edit] Merge proposal As the two articles proposed, Analytic cubism and Synthetic cubism are both stubs, with little activity, I feel that their purpose may be better served in this article by merging the three under this title. This is only a tentative proposal, but my thinking behind it is that the viewing of all the related information will be easier with the topics together. Martinp23 21:31, 28 November 2006 (UTC)


[edit] A merge seems a very good idea I agree with the previous writer and I support the merging of the Analytical and the Sythetic Cubism articles in to a single Cubism article.

Merging Synthetic and Analytic Cubism into sections of one main article on "Cubism" is a fine idea. It helps in providing a complete picture of the artistic movement on a single page. As 'Analytic' and 'Synthetic' are opposing styles, it would do justice to both if they are placed and presented on the same page with Cubism. D.D.

Can not an article be a Contents-link of another article? This would be a way to go through several levels of knowledge in a hierarchical mode. Both branches of cubism would be contents of Cubism, Cubism would be a contents-link of Modern Art and Impressionism, and both of these could be content-links in several other Art articles. This way you have the best of the two worlds, of keeping a significant body of knowledge at the level of article, and still keep integrated and complete articles of subjects encompassing other sub-subjects. GO

here,here!

well i am not sure. I think the main cubist page at the moment seems to be more architecturally based. maybe it wouln't benefit then if synthetic and analytical cubism were added as it is an art movement. either that or the cubist page has a huge edit.172.207.198.199 00:07, 11 May 2007 (UTC)


[edit] The 3 Main Types Of Cubism There were many types of cubism. The three main ones were these. There is ANALYTICAL CUBISM (1909-1912), SYNTHETIC CUBISM (1912-1919) and ORPHISM CUBISM. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 82.109.143.194 (talk) 17:20, 21 January 2007 (UTC).

As it stands now, there are two articles that link to each other, about two kinds. One of them (on Analytic) starts out saying there are two major branches, the other (Synthetic) starts out saying there are three major branches. Could you recommend a clear, complete, and consistent introductory statement for both? --Sukkoth 10:06, 10 February 2007 (UTC) Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Cubism"

[edit] Under the heading "Analytic Cubism" there is a line of random characters where there should be words finishing a sentence, a period, and more words beginning a new sentence. << ...Analytic cubists "analyzed" kjhshdjkhsajhdjkhajkColor]] was almost non-existent...>> Micharjuna (talk) 13:37, 12 January 2008 (UTC)

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conor grayson

Re-Cubism, I think along with these other observations, it is valid to mention relativity. How seeing the same object from multiple viewpoints and times correlates to thinking going on in physics and philosophy. After all art is not just a decorative activity though it could be argued that cubism did degenerate into that.Vapona 01:10, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Re Cubism, it's a complex and controversial subject and I don't think the article does it justice. I've taken the liberty of adding an external link to a recent essay on Picasso's part in its development. Hope this is okay. Daisy2 21:35, 10 August 2007 (UTC)

Primitive cubism[edit]

In 1907 Pablo Picasso painted several studies and paintings that predict his more classical Cubist innovations culminating notably with Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, considered the antecedent of Cubism. Picasso's 1907 paintings can be referred to as Primitive cubism. Modernist (talk) 14:25, 18 June 2008 (UTC)

cubism and its ideology[edit]

I tried to make the ideology section's sentences hang together a little more, and cut down on repetition. I believe I did so with out significantly altering its actual content; feel free to correct me if I have. Zweidinge (talk) 19:37, 2 September 2008 (UTC)

Cubism is a very interesting and unusual way of art. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.209.252.25 (talk) 12:51, 26 October 2008 (UTC)


Beginning of Surrealist Movement[edit]

The intro to this article says that the second wave of Cubism died down in 1919, when "Surrealism became popular." But literary Surrealism (let alone Surrealism in the visual arts) didn't even start until 1923-1924. The first Surrealist manifesto was published in 1924.

Surrealism as a movement began to form long before Breton's manifesto was published in 1924. The movement began coming together out of the Dada movement formed during World War I initially as a protest against the violence of war. Giorgio de Chirico as an example was painting prototype surrealist paintings in Paris as early as 1914....Modernist (talk) 19:47, 15 April 2009 (UTC)

Tom Geere?[edit]

who on earth is "tom geere" and why is he cited as a "[creator]" of cubism? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Goodshotjanson (talkcontribs) 06:09, 13 January 2010 (UTC)

Good catch - it's called vandalism...Modernist (talk) 06:16, 13 January 2010 (UTC)

"Tesserism"?[edit]

As dizzying as cubist artwork can appear, I believe that it may even serve some mathematical purpose: visualizing the perspective of four-dimensional beings. Since cubism basically views a picture with depth from multiple angles at once (causing the dizzying effect), and such a viewpoint could be possible for four-dimensional entities.

Such a viewpoint could be incorporated into artwork. One difference between current cubism and "tesserism" (after the 4D equivalent to the cube, the tesseract) is that, in tesserism, viewpoints are also from the inside. It may look even more confusing, but still, it could possibly make it the slightest bit easier to comprehend such a perspective, from "anove".

--MethanalCHO (talk) 01:48, 26 March 2010 (UTC)MethanalCHO

I just cut this image out and moved it here[edit]

Caves? Did you say caves?...Modernist (talk) 22:56, 19 July 2010 (UTC)
Cal Poly Pomona university library in Pomona, California.[1]

"I (opinion) do not find anything Cubist about this building other than it is almost a cube. The reference included adds nothing, unless there is something buried deep within it. If we are going to consider every cube-like structure to be "modern cubism" then I will put on sack cloth, rub on ashes and retire to my cave. If this edit is okay, I'll probably be back for more. Einar akaCarptrash (talk) 22:15, 19 July 2010 (UTC)

Yes, caves. I shall dig out shots of mine shortly, but, yes, M, you have the idea. Carptrash (talk) 23:41, 19 July 2010 (UTC)

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Revised article throughout[edit]

13:39, 13 April 2012‎ Coldcreation (talk | contribs)‎ . . (41,131 bytes) (+13,285)‎ . . (Revised entire article.)

After having reviewed in detail the contents of the article on Cubism, it became evident that there were historical inconsistencies apparently based on outdated material. In addition, most of the information was extracted from the writings of Douglas Cooper ("The Cubist Epoch" 1970). It is felt that the writings of other art historians, too, should be taken into consideration on a topic so vast as that of Cubism and so important in the history of modern art.

Some modifications have already been made; including adding references, notes or citations where there were none, and adding new material based on the opinions of other art historians (as well as those of artists themselves, directly involved with Cubism).

These further modifications serve to broaden the scope of debate that defines Cubism beyond the notions presented by Kahnweiler (mostly in defense of the artists he represented). These notions, which include terms such as Analytic Cubism and Synthetic Cubism, are both restrictive and outdated. Restrictive because they refer primarily to Braque, Picasso and Gris, while excluding the Salon Cubists (e.g., Metzinger, Duchamp, Gleizes, Delaunay). Outdated because since these terms entered the arena (from the 1920s) it has since been noticed that Picasso, Braque and Gris, themselves, would often defy such classification in the work produced during these periods, i.e., the terms were restrictive even for the work they attempted to define. In other words, the stylistic history of Cubism is far too complex to be summed up by the description of two phases, even for those artists works that were classified as such.

Note too, the text originally under the heading of Analytic Cubism had nothing to do with Analytic Cubism. It was just a rehashing of chronological events that led to Cubism (a topic already covered in the article), followed by the source of the term "Cubism" (by Vauxelles) and an apparently aimless list of other Cubist artists.

While the text under the heading Synthetic Cubism attempted to elucidate what was meant the the term (e.g., "Synthetic Cubism is more of a pushing of several objects together"), it was limited to a small group of Cubists (again Kahnweiler's Picasso, Braque and Gris)

Now, subheadings under History include Conception and Origins, Technical and stylistic aspects, Early Cubism, Abstraction and the Ready-made, Intentions and Interpretations. These are followed by Cubist Sculpture (with an internal link to the main article), Cubism after 1918, and Architecture.

For now I've left virtually untouched the following sections: Cubism Today and Cubism in other fields. Though it should be noted that the Cubism Today section remains unreferenced.

Finally, for convenience, I've reworked this article in the Sandbox section and uploaded anew the entire article, while retaining its editing history.

Coldcreation 13:42, 13 April 2012 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Coldcreation (talkcontribs)

I have removed your introduction which borrows entirely from MoMA, otherwise your revisions seem worthwhile and valuable, good work; thank you...Modernist (talk) 23:55, 14 April 2012 (UTC)
Indeed, very nice work. Kudos to you :) Nolelover Talk·Contribs 19:11, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

Section d'Or[edit]

A new section has been added to the Cubism article: Section d'Or, with an internal link to the main page (recently revised and expanded). Coldcreation (talk) 10:41, 31 May 2012 (UTC)

Music[edit]

The lede mentions Cubism's influence on music, yet there is nothing in the article about it. Does anyone know of any examples of Cubist music that could be added? ---The Old JacobiteThe '45 17:02, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

"Cubism has been considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century."[edit]

By whom?

According to whom?

It's a relatively bold assertion in the lede -- a reasonable person could disagree. A citation or else a rewrite is needed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.247.22.149 (talk) 04:45, 6 February 2014 (UTC)
Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist}} template (see the help page).