Talk:Lynn Anderson

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Top 10 Country Women and Gold Records, "Lynn Anderson Show"[edit]

Please source this information in the article. Lynn Anderson did come in as the #9 female vocalist of alltime in a 1996 Billboard reference book by Joel Whitburn but that was 11 years ago and it is highly possible that she has since been bumped from the top ten by several artists who has since emerged on the scene or have had major post-1995 success.

Also while I have read that Anderson has 17 gold records or so, I believe these are all from the recording of "Rose Garden" in various countries rather than different records. In America she has had a gold single (Rose Garden), platinum album (Rose Garden), and gold album (Greatest Hits) but I believe no other additional gold recordings, so this should be clarified in the article.

comment added by 209.124.227.44 (talk) 08:16, 9 October 2007 (UTC)

      • RE. BILLBOARD TOP 10 COUNTRY WOMEN***

As of 2006, the most recent publication of Billboard's Top 10 Female Country Artists - for alltime record sales - in the 11 year span since 1996, she has moved from #9 to #10. You must remember, "Rose Garden" was THE biggest selling album by a female country artist from 1970 until 1997, until Shania Twain broke Lynn's long-standing "record".

Secondly, "Rose Garden" went gold (and Platinum) in the U.S., as you stated, however, the only additional gold records for "RG" were from Japan, UK, British Columbia, Brazil, Germany, France . That does not constitute 17 gold albums. Her other albums which reached gold status are listed on her discography, and there are 17 in all (including the six from other countries for "RG").

Finally, the "Lynn Anderson Show" was a one time special in 1977, however, it WAS a MAJOR network special - CBS - with special guests Tina Turner and Eddie Rabbit. I can't remember, but I don't think the entry about her special implied it was an ongoing network show, it was just as I stated above .... a SPECIAL. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.23.108.2 (talk) 13:20, 10 October 2007 (UTC)

      • FOLLOWUP: STILL PROBLEMS***

You still have not specifically sourced the comment that Lynn Anderson remains one of the top ten alltime female country artists. It should be traceable to an exact issue date or book. I am not saying it's inaccurate (although that's possible given the success of Shania, Faith, Martina, and Trisha in the 1990's and 2000's since the first listing) but it needs to be confirmed.

The other information is incorrect. Lynn Anderson has only two RIAA gold albums in America, "Rose Garden" and "Greatest Hits". This is easily verified by (A) Joel Whitburn's TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS 1964-1997 book which notes gold records and (B) RIAA's website itself which you can confirm the official American gold records of any star [1] - click on search database. Gold records for country music were quite rare pre-1980, the years of Anderson's greatest success. Many (probably most) number one BILLBOARD country albums of the period did not go gold, certainly albums that peaked at no. 41, 27, or 37 on the country chart did not. Gold award status should not be guessed at on a site that presumes to be accurate.

I have no idea how many gold records Lynn Anderson has worldwide, I will accept the claim of 17 by her publicists but still they would have to be mostly international records (which incidentally are often awarded for sales well under a million copies since America has a far greater record buying public) because she has two albums and one single that went gold in America and as well as the platinum album for further sales of the "Rose Garden" album. If she has only six international gold records as you say then her total is nine gold records and one platinum.

Lynn Anderson's television special was titled "Lynn Anderson's Country Welcome" and it WAS a syndicated program, not a network one. I am not positive but I believe it was produced by the people who made "Music Hall America", a Nashville variety hour syndicated around this time that was guest hosted on occasion by Anderson and was also a pilot for a similar syndicated series for Lynn. No doubt it aired on CBS channels in many markets (and NBC and ABC ones in others) but it was not produced by CBS. I know Robert Oermann claims in his country female vocalist book it was a CBS special but it was not (he also says Liz Anderson wrote "No Another Time" which she didn't). The fact that there is no listing for it on IMDB.com also strongly suggests it was a syndicated program as most network specials are listed. When it was made in 1977 Eddie Rabbitt in his first years of success and Tina Turner was newly trying to establish herself as a solo act (this was years before her 1980's comeback) so their presence may make it seem like a network show but at the time they were not the superstars they would become.

Vegas[edit]

Lynn Anderson was not the first female Country singer to headline her own show in Las Vegas. That goes to Patsy Cline in November 1962, when she became the first female Country Music singer to headline her own show in Las Vegas.

Unsourced material.[edit]

I've just removed the unsourced text in accordance with WP:BLP:

  • In the 1990s, Anderson was arrested for slapping her child in public. She was released on bond.
  • On May 3, 2006, Anderson was arrested with a DUI charge after she got into a traffic accident in New Mexico, due to drunk driving. However, she was later released on a bond by the police. Her previous cases were later dropped by the Taos, New Mexico court, as long as she did not commit any other offenses. Anderson spent two months in the Betty Ford Clinic for alcohol rehabilitation.

Does anyone know of any sources for these? Like I said, I've removed the text, but if someone can find reliable sources, it can be put back in. Acalamari 22:33, 9 May 2007 (UTC)

    • Yes, it is true she spent two months in the Betty Ford Clinic for alcohol rehabilitation. I am in contact with Lynn Anderson's fan club president via e-mail, who knows Anderson personally. I recently asked the president about this matter, and he stated that she indeed did spend those 2 months in the BFC. Dottiewest1fan 19:16, 28 September 2007 (UTC)

THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO DOCUMENTATION THAT LYNN ANDERSON WAS ARRESTED FOR SLAPPING A CHILD. Absolutely NONE!

        • Before adding any information to this biographical article, please make sure that your commentary is FACTUAL and GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT. ***** Anything less is a disservice to the artist.
            • Seriously, what a shameful thing to say about Ms. Anderson. This website is not a tabloid or a place to spread rumors!!!!!!! Dottiewest1fan 19:16, 28 September 2007 (UTC)

Cleanup tag[edit]

I added a tag because there are parts of this article that read like a fan site. A few examples: "'Rose Garden' was as big of a hit as anyone could have possibly had at the time, and she had it"; "one of its brightest stars was Lynn Anderson"; "Anderson has racked up an astonishing eight number one records". I also added the tag to the trivia section (see WP:TRIVIA); much of that section could be integrated into the article elsewhere. --Paul Erik 02:40, 30 May 2007 (UTC)

Paul -- It was Country Music Historian Robert K. Oreman who stated "ROSE GARDEN was as big of a hit as anyone could have possibly had at the time, and she had it." I'm not entirely sure that sounds like something from a "fan site". It appears to be more factual than mere fan site fluff.

9/14/07

I WISH WHOMEVER IT IS THAT KEEPS UPDATING THIS ARTICLE ON (WHAT SEEMS LIKE) A BI-DAILY BASIS WOULD STOP. THIS PERSON APPARENTLY THINKS THEY'RE A PROFESSIONAL WRITER, HOWEVER, THEY REMOVE FACTUAL INFORMATION AND REPLACE IT WITH NONSENSE, NOT TO MENTION GRAMMATICAL AND SPELLING ERRORS GALORE! PLEASE STOP! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.23.108.2 (talk) 15:36, 14 September 2007 (UTC)

Official Website[edit]

My question is what happened to Lynn Anderson's official website. Last time I looked at lynn-anderson.com it said that her website was coming soon. I remember there being one before that. Whatever happened to it? Can anyone tell me? Dottiewest1fan 15:29, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

Source?[edit]

This is a segment from the article: "In 1992, she recorded a new studio album titled Cowboy's Sweetheart, released by Laselight Records. Emmylou Harris and Marty Stuart reluctantly appeared as guest performers on the album." How does the person submitting this know Harris' and Stuart's attitudes? I did not find confirmation in the source link. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Oakbranch8 (talkcontribs) 17:26, 26 July 2009 (UTC)

death[edit]

Grammy Awards tonight said she had died within the past year. Anyone want to confirm or add the details? 68.71.8.68 (talk) 03:46, 13 February 2012 (UTC)

Does not appear to be true. No news, and still active on Twitter. Yworo (talk) 23:09, 13 February 2012 (UTC)