Talk:Nizhny Novgorod

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Old talk[edit]

It's false to say that Vladimir Lenin died in Nizhny Novgorod. According to my reliable sources it happend in the subburb of Moscow called Gorky.

                                                      the native of N.N.

I was just reading the Novosibirsk and Nizhny Novgorod pages and it seems that both claim to be the third largest city in Russia. Which one is it? Timc 16:49, 20 Oct 2003 (UTC)

As the result of the population changes, Novosibirsk (1999 estimate 1,402,100) is believed to have recently outgrown Nizhny Novgorod (1999 estimate 1,361,500). Many people do not look up or trust the recent estimate data and continue to regard Nizhny Novgorod as the third largest city in Russia, which is not far from the truth.

Actually, NN is the 5th largest city in Russia. But it used to be the third. As NN-inhabitants are snobbish and like to live in the third largest city of Russia, they are neglecting new data about population of Russian city. It's funny but NN-inhabitants also think they live in the third capital of Russia, meanwhile the rest of Russia's poplation have never heard about "third capital of Russia" ;-))) --Matacob 08:52, 23 January 2007 (UTC)

It is a shameless lie to allege that NN-inhabitants are "snobbish". City authorities have no real achievements to boast, and that's why they blow their own trumpet about "the third capital". Most NN-inhabitants are reasonable and sober people who: a) don't trust the trumpet, b) don't participate in blowing mayor's trumpet, c) are apathetic to the idea.--Achp ru 19:08, 24 January 2007 (UTC)

Gorky?[edit]

Funny how tricky russian language can be when transliterated :^) Yes N.N. was Gorky, and Lenin died in Gorky, but N.N. is rather Gorkiy and Gorky is rather Gorki.

Association de Amigos de Gorki[edit]

Hi, I see, you insist on inserting a mention about Association of friends of Gorki, I appreciate international cultural solidarity, and sure, there are mentions of such things as sister cities, but it feels a little odd to see this mention in history section, but this is quiete manifested thing, like you get posters mentioning this programs, days of culture of say Tampere in N.N. Even though you Amigos de Gorki were first foreigners to set foot on this city after a long time of being a closed city, but it does not establish an inhererent notability to go into history of the city itself, just next to Minin, Pozharsky, Makariev Fair, Stroganov, and Gorki. I'm sorry I love this organisation, but I'm afraid I can not allow it in history section.–Gnomz007(?) 19:41, August 29, 2005 (UTC)

Gorky Re-Rename Date 1990/1991?[edit]

The article lists two dates. 1990 at the top and '91 in the middle. Which is right?

1990. --Katenkka (talk) 17:52, 24 July 2009 (UTC)
And I've added a source. Cheers,—Ëzhiki (Igels Hérissonovich Ïzhakoff-Amursky) • (yo?); 18:43, July 24, 2009 (UTC)

Watford[edit]

Sorry but Watford is twinned with Novgorod NOT Nizhny Novgorod.

History section?[edit]

Shouldn't this mention more of the modern history? Wasn't it a closed city for a time? JoshuaZ 04:30, 16 September 2006 (UTC)

Mc seem 06:59, 25 September 2006 (UTC) Yes, it became an open city in 1991, maybe it makes sense to mention about that.

Bridge[edit]

It can't be true that the first bridge was built in 1917. I have seen several pictures of earlier bridges. Here is one from a book published in 1909: http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19534/19534-h/images/fig021.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19534/19534-h/19534-h.htm&usg=__SD8taKs2gVuCWum7vrUB6nAX2SM=&h=525&w=820&sz=133&hl=en&start=15&zoom=1&tbnid=H7e6nw0L4LhJmM:&tbnh=157&tbnw=253&ei=gjvhTZSECY-SswbhoI2NBg&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnijni%2Bnovgorod%2Bpont%26hl%3Den%26biw%3D1230%26bih%3D680%26gbv%3D2%26as_st%3Dy%26tbs%3Dic:gray%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=528&vpy=352&dur=2349&hovh=180&hovw=281&tx=124&ty=127&page=2&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:12,s:15&biw=1230&bih=680 Evangeline (talk) 18:31, 28 May 2011 (UTC)

Nizhnij Novgorod[edit]

When looking the map of Nizhnij Novgorod I am suprised to find all city parts given in this article in their "Russificated form". I mean (my mother langue is not English) is it correct to publish them in English Wikipedia just like that say Keln for Cologne (Köln), Gimalaja for Himalaja etc. Or at least place the Russian version in brankets after the English version. How sounds Im.Parizhskoj Kommuny / Named (in honour to) Paris Commune meaning the Paris (Workers) Commune after the French - Prussian War, or Moskovskoje Shosse / Moscover (Moscow) Chaussee, Sortirovotshenyj / Freight Yards, Komsomolskij / Komsomolian, Sormover / Sormovo. Shtshjerbinski I, Shtshjerbinski II, Shtshjerbinski III / Scherbin I, II, III. Just few examples. Or streets like Ulitsa Svobodnyj / Street of Freedom, Prospekt Gagarina / View of Gagarin.

I would like to have more information of suburb named Montshegorskij / Monchegorsk. This Montshe is real rare name of Sami origin, only if the original old one, rises many questions. When this suburb was founded? Has it any connection to Monchegorsk Nickel Mines in Kola Peninsula. Is there any production factory which uses as raw material nickel? What is the reason to name this part of the City with this name. Thanks —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.112.171.7 (talk) 18:44, 25 August 2008 (UTC)

As to the names on city maps - it's pretty common for maps of foreign countries and cities published in English-speaking countries to use the local names, in local spelling (or standard transliteration) to a large extent, "anglicizing" only a comparatively small number of best-known features. Take a look at a map of Paris or Beijing in a Lonely Planet book or a Rand McNally atlas - they mostly retain French or Chinese names as they are. Vmenkov (talk) 05:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)
As to Мончегорская улица (Monchegorskaia St), I am pretty sure it's named after Monchegorsk. Both Severonickel (the coper/nickel plant that was Monchegorsk's reason for existence) and GAZ are among the major USSR industrialization projects of the late 1920s and 1930s, so it's only natural that they had a street in Avtozavod District (near GAZ) named after the city of Monchegorsk. (Unfortunately, the city of Monchegorsk did not reciprocate - as far as I know, it does not have a GAZ Street or Gorky Street.) Beyond that, I doubt that there is a particular "industrial connection", such as, e.g. GAZ or any other local company being a more significant consumers of Monchegorsk's copper, nickel, cobalt, or platium, than any other major Soviet industrial plant. Vmenkov (talk) 05:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)

History of Nizhny Novgorod[edit]

Removed copyvio.Ëzhiki (Igels Hérissonovich Ïzhakoff-Amursky) • (yo?); March 9, 2010; 14:18 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.37.158.103 (talk) 13:21, 6 March 2010 (UTC)

A couple of points:
  • This is the English Wikipedia - please write in English (even if it's about Russian subjects).
  • The history of Nizhny Novgorod is adaquately covered in the article. If you think corrections need to be made, then please do so, but please write in English.
Astronaut (talk) 09:55, 9 March 2010 (UTC)
That maybe a moot point now it has been revealed as a copyvio. Astronaut (talk) 14:57, 9 March 2010 (UTC)

Curfew in soviet era NN[edit]

http://www.sras.org/guides_nizhny_novgorod claims "Sakharov [...] spent six years in exiled Nizhney Novgorod, then a bleak, closed town with an early curfew largely enforced by its own incredibly high crime rate.". Is this information correct? I mean, can anybody acknowledge that at the time (1980-1986) the crime rate was so hight, that people didn't dare going out at night? If so, according to MHO this should be mentioned. --Patagonier (talk) 11:34, 2 July 2011 (UTC) (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benutzer:Patagonier)

I visited the city a number of times during the period, and don't believe that the locals were any more afraid to be out after dark than at an average Soviet - or American - city. (One can guess that Moscow, as the national capital, would get better policing that other cities, but I don't think it was such a drastic difference. Places that would be stereotypically viewed as high-crime in the late Soviet Russia would be some smaller cities/towns in northern European Russia or Siberia where major correctional facilities were/are located, and where there would be a large population of ex-convects). So in my view, "curfew" is largely a journalistic exaggeration. Even if on occasions the authorities may have arranged for local thugs to harass Sakharov or his wife, this had little to do per se with the geographic location to which they were confined. -- Vmenkov (talk) 12:40, 2 July 2011 (UTC)