Tim Huelskamp

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Tim Huelskamp
Tim Huelskamp.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kansas's 1st district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2011
Preceded by Jerry Moran
Member of the Kansas Senate
from the 38th district
In office
January 3, 1997 – January 5, 2011
Preceded by Marian Reynolds
Succeeded by Garrett Love (appointed)
Personal details
Born Timothy Alan Huelskamp
(1968-11-11) November 11, 1968 (age 45)
Fowler, Kansas
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Angela Huelskamp
Children four
Residence Fowler, Kansas
Religion Roman Catholic
Website huelskamp.house.gov

Timothy Alan "Tim" Huelskamp[1] (born November 11, 1968) is a politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Kansas's 1st congressional district since 2011. The district, popularly known as the "Big First," spills across a 63-county swath of central and western Kansas—more than half the state. He is a member of the Republican Party. He represented the 38th District in the Kansas Senate from 1997 until entering Congress in 2011.[2]

Early life, education, and career[edit]

Huelskamp was born near and raised on the family farm in Fowler, Kansas. Pioneered by his grandparents Martin and Clara in 1926, the farm operation includes raising corn, cattle, wheat, milo, and soybeans. He attended elementary and high school in Fowler, where he was a Farm Bureau Youth Leader, a member of St. Anthony’s Parish, and active in both 4-H and Future Farmers of America.

After attending seminary for two years in Santa Fe, Huelskamp continued his education at the College of Santa Fe (now Santa Fe University of Art and Design) and received his B.A. in social science education in 1991. He received his Ph.D. in political science, concentrating in agricultural policy from the American University in 1995.[3][4]

Now a farmer, Huelskamp has also been a teacher and a budget and legislative analyst.[4][5]

Personal life[edit]

Huelskamp and his wife Angela live in Fowler. They have four adopted children.[6]

Kansas Senate[edit]

Elections[edit]

In 1996, Huelskamp challenged Republican incumbent Marian Reynolds in the primary and won by a shocking margin, taking 62 percent of the vote to Reynolds' 38 percent.[7] The youngest state senator in 20 years, he then won re-election by wide margins in 2000, 2004, and 2008.

Committee assignments[edit]

Huelskamp served on the following legislative committees:[8]

  • Joint Committee on Information Technology (Chairman)
  • Agriculture and Natural Resource
  • Education
  • Ethics and Local Government (Chairman)

A leading conservative, Huelskamp had served on the state's Ways and Means Committee but was forced off due to clashes with the Committee's moderate leadership."[9]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

2010 election[edit]

Seven-term congressman Jerry Moran gave up the Big First seat to make a successful run for the United States Senate. This touched off a free-for-all in the Republican primary—the real contest in this heavily Republican district. Huelskamp finished first in the six-candidate primary field with 34.8 percent of the vote, all but assuring that he would be the district's next congressman.[10]

Huelskamp ran against Democratic nominee Alan Jilka and Libertarian nominee Jack W. Warner. Huelskamp was endorsed by The Club for Growth, Mike Huckabee,[11][12] Conservative Leadership PAC, Concerned Women for America Legislative Action Committee,[2] Ron Paul and Ken Blackwell.[13]

As expected, Huelskamp won the seat in a rout, taking 73 percent of the vote.[14]

2012 election[edit]

Huelskamp ran unopposed in the general election.

Legislative activity[edit]

In early 2012, Huelskamp introduced legislation that would ensure military chaplains could not be “directed, ordered or required to perform any duty, rite, ritual, ceremony, service or function that is contrary to the conscience, moral principles or religious beliefs of the chaplain, or contrary to the moral principles or religious beliefs of the chaplain’s faith group.” The language appeared to be related to permitting same-sex marriages on military bases in states where such unions are permitted.[15]

Sovereign Debt Crisis[edit]

On February 16, 2012, during a contentious three-hour House Budget Committee hearing with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, Huelskamp warned of the looming threat of an economic crisis similar to the one then taking place in Europe. Representative Huelskamp accused Geithner and the entire Obama administration of failing to correct the U.S.'s debt crisis, which he believed would lead the country down the same path. Secretary Geithner replied that Huelskamp had an “adolescent perspective on how to think about economic policy.”[16]

DOMA - Defense of Marriage Act Constitutional Amendment[edit]

After the United States Supreme Court declared the Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA unconstitutional[17] on June 26, 2013 Congressman Huelskamp immediately announced that he would introduce a constitutional amendment to restore the Defense of Marriage Act.[18] He then went on The Steve Deace Show, a conservative radio program, to denounce the Supreme Court Justices. “The idea that Jesus Christ himself was degrading and demeaning is what they’ve come down to,” he said. "I can’t even stand to read the decisions because I don’t even think they’d pass law school with decisions like that.”[19]

Committee assignments[edit]

The House Republican Steering Committee removed Huelskamp from both the Budget Committee and the Agriculture Committee in late 2012[20] as part of a larger party leadership-caucus shift. At a Heritage Foundation lunch in the immediate wake of the removal, the representative said: “It’s petty, its vindictive, and if you have any conservative principles you will be punished for articulating those.”[21]

On January 3, 2013, Huelskamp appeared to be counting votes as part of an effort to unseat House Speaker John Boehner when the 113th Congress convened. Huelskamp nominated conservative Jim Jordan to replace Boehner. When asked about the anti-Boehner effort a spokesman for Huelskamp declined to comment.[22]

Caucus memberships[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Representative Timothy Alan Huelskamp (Tim) (R-Kansas, 1st)". LegiStorm. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  2. ^ a b "Endorsements Start in Kansas Congressional Race". Associated Press. February 1, 2009. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  3. ^ Senator Tim Huelskamp (KS), Project Vote Smart
  4. ^ a b Hanna, John (March 15, 1998). "Unassuming Ph.D. is emerging". The Topeka Capital-Journal. Associated Press. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Senator Tim Huelskamp: Kansas Senate District #38", Kansas Senate Republican Party Pages. Retrieved 2011-07-27.
  6. ^ "Duncan one of three delegates elected for Republican National Convention". The Salina Journal. March 31, 2008. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  7. ^ Hanna, John (August 7, 1996). "Four incumbent state legislators lose to their challengers". The Fort Scott Tribune. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  8. ^ Profile from the Kansas Legislature[dead link]
  9. ^ Huelskamp ad under scrutiny, Tim Carpenter, Topeka Capital-Journal, July 20, 2010
  10. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=511123
  11. ^ Klepper, David (February 17, 2009). "Huckabee endorses Huelskamp's Congressional bid". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  12. ^ Jacobs, Jeremy P. (February 17, 2009). "Huelskamp Picks up Huckabee Endorsement". The Hill. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  13. ^ LaCerte, Phil (February 5, 2009). "Huelskamp bill pushes for school district spending transparency". Kansas Liberty. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  14. ^ "2010 Unofficial Kansas General Election Results". Kansas Secretary of State. November 3, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  15. ^ Hoskinson, Charles, "Don't Ask Don't Tell: War over gays in military in new phase", Politico, 1 February 2012.
  16. ^ Robb, Greg (February 16, 2012). "House Republicans warn of European-style debt crisis". MarketWatch. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  17. ^ Supreme Court DOMA Decision Rules Federal Same-Sex Marriage Ban Unconstitutional Huffington Post - June 26, 2013
  18. ^ Rep. Tim Huelskamp To File Constitutional Amendment To Restore Doma - Politico.com - June 26,2013
  19. ^ Huelskamp: DOMA Ruling an Attack on Jesus Christ; Justices Couldn't Pass Law School Right Wing Watch - June 28, 2013
  20. ^ Wing, Nick, "Tim Huelskamp: John Boehner Guilty Of 'Petty, Vindictive Politics' In Committee Ousters", The Huffington Post, 12/12/2012.
  21. ^ Weiner, Rachel, "Conservatives bite back over House GOP purge", Washington Post Post Politics blog, December 5, 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-02.
  22. ^ Sherman, Jake, and John Bresnahan (January 3, 2013), "Conservatives rebel against Boehner", Politico'.'

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jerry Moran
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kansas's 1st congressional district

January 3, 2011 – present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Jaime Herrera Beutler
R-Washington
United States Representatives by seniority
309th
Succeeded by
Bill Huizenga
R-Michigan