Tioga County, New York

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Tioga County, New York
Tioga County Courthouse NY Feb 09.jpg
Tioga County Courthouse
Seal of Tioga County, New York
Seal
Map of New York highlighting Tioga County
Location in the state of New York
Map of the United States highlighting New York
New York's location in the U.S.
Founded 1791
Seat Owego
Largest village Waverly
Area
 • Total 523 sq mi (1,355 km2)
 • Land 519 sq mi (1,344 km2)
 • Water 4 sq mi (10 km2), 0.81%
Population
 • (2010) 51,125
 • Density 98/sq mi (38/km²)
Congressional district 23rd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.tiogacountyny.com

Tioga County /tˈɡə/ is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 51,125.[1] Its county seat is Owego.[2] Its name derives from an American Indian word meaning "at the forks," describing a meeting place.

Tioga County is part of the Binghamton, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

In 1789, Montgomery County was reduced in size by the splitting off of Ontario County. The actual area split off from Montgomery County was much larger than the present county, also including the present Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Orleans, Steuben, Wyoming, Yates, and part of Schuyler and Wayne counties.

Tioga County was one of three counties split off from Montgomery County (the others being Herkimer and Otsego Counties) in 1791. Tioga County was at this time much larger than the present county, also including the present Broome and Chemung counties and parts of Chenango and Schuyler counties.

Tioga County was reduced in size in 1798 by the splitting off of Chemung County (which also included part of the present Schuyler County and by the combination of a portion with a portion of Herkimer County to create Chenango County. In 1806 it was further reduced by the splitting off of Broome County.

Geography[edit]

Tioga County is located in southwest New York State, west of Binghamton and directly north of the border with Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna River flows into Pennsylvania from this county. The county is considered part of the Southern Tier region of New York State.

The highest elevation is an unnamed 1,994-foot (607.8 m) hill in the county's northern corner.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 523 square miles (1,354 km²), of which 519 square miles (1,343 km²) is land and 4 square miles (11 km²) (0.81%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 7,109
1810 7,899 11.1%
1820 16,971 114.8%
1830 27,690 63.2%
1840 20,527 −25.9%
1850 24,880 21.2%
1860 28,748 15.5%
1870 30,572 6.3%
1880 32,673 6.9%
1890 29,935 −8.4%
1900 27,951 −6.6%
1910 25,624 −8.3%
1920 24,212 −5.5%
1930 25,480 5.2%
1940 27,072 6.2%
1950 30,166 11.4%
1960 37,802 25.3%
1970 46,513 23.0%
1980 49,812 7.1%
1990 52,337 5.1%
2000 51,784 −1.1%
2010 51,125 −1.3%
Est. 2012 50,478 −1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census of 2010, there were 51,125 people residing in the county, with 22,203 housing units, of these 20,350 (91.3%) occupied, 1,853 (8.3%) vacant. The population density was 98 people per square mile (38/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.9% White, 0.7% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved October 13, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°10′N 76°18′W / 42.17°N 76.30°W / 42.17; -76.30