Weyburn

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Weyburn
City of Weyburn
Weyburn POOL (126040461).jpg
Flag of Weyburn
Flag
Nickname(s): The Opportunity City
Motto: "Vision, Achievement, Progress"
Weyburn is located in Saskatchewan
Weyburn
Weyburn
Coordinates: 49°39′40″N 103°51′9″W / 49.66111°N 103.85250°W / 49.66111; -103.85250
Country Canada
Province Saskatchewan
Census division Division #2
Government
 • Mayor Debra Button
 • Governing Body Weyburn City Council
 • MP Ed Komarnicki (CPC)
 • MLA Dustin Duncan (SP)
Area
 • Total 15.78 km2 (6.09 sq mi)
Elevation 561 m (1,841 ft)
Population (2011)
 • Total 10,484
Website City of Weyburn

Weyburn (Assiniboine: ošų́kyuze[1]) is the ninth-largest city in Saskatchewan, Canada. It is located on the Souris River 110 kilometres (68 mi) southeast of the provincial capital of Regina and is 70 km (43 mi) north of the border with the United States. The name is reputedly a corruption of the Scottish "wee burn," referring to a small creek.[2] The city is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Weyburn No. 67.

History[edit]

The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) reached the future site of Weyburn from Brandon, Manitoba in 1892 and the Soo Line from North Portal on the US border in 1893. A post office opened in 1895 and a land office in 1899 in anticipation of the land rush which soon ensued. Weyburn was legally constituted a village in 1900, a town in 1903 and finally as a city in 1913.[3] From 1910 until 1931 the Weyburn Security Bank was headquartered in the city.[4]

Weyburn had since become an important railroad town in Saskatchewan – the Pasqua branch or the Souris, Arcola, Weyburn, Regina CPR branch; Portal Section on the CPR / Soo Line; Moose Jaw, Weyburn, Shaunavon, Lethbridge CPR section; the Brandon, Marfield, Carlyle, Lampman, Radville, Willow Bunch section of the Canadian National Railway (CNR); and the Regina, Weyburn, Radville, Estevan, Northgate CNR section have all run through Weyburn.[5][6]

Weyburn was previously home to the Souris Valley Mental Health Hospital, which was closed as a health care facility and sold in 2006, and demolished in 2009. When the mental hospital opened in 1921, it was the largest building in The British Commonwealth and was considered to be on the cutting edge of experimental treatments for people with mental disabilities. The facility had a reputation of leading the way in therapeutic programming. At its peak, the facility was home to approximately 2,500 patients. The history of the facility is explored in the documentary Weyburn: An Archaeology of Madness.[7]

Demographics[edit]

Census Population
1901 113
1911 2,210
1921 3,193
1931 5,002
1941 6,119
1951 7,148
1961 9,101
1971 8,815
1981 9,523
1991 9,673
2001 9,534
2006 9,433
2011 10,484

The city had a population of 10,484 in 2011, having increased from 9,433 in 2006.

Geography and climate[edit]

Weyburn is situated near the upper delta of the 470-mile (760 km) long Souris River. The Souris River continues southeast through North Dakota eventually meeting the Assiniboine River in Manitoba.[11] In the 1800s this area was known as an extension of the Greater Yellow Grass Marsh. Extensive flood control programs have created reservoirs, parks and waterfowl centres along the Souris River.[12] Between 1988 to 1995, the Rafferty-Alameda Project was constructed to alleviate spring flooding problems created by the Souris River.[13]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Weyburn
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 11.5
(52.7)
16.0
(60.8)
23.3
(73.9)
32.2
(90)
37.5
(99.5)
40.5
(104.9)
41.7
(107.1)
40.0
(104)
38.0
(100.4)
31.1
(88)
24.0
(75.2)
14.5
(58.1)
41.7
(107.1)
Average high °C (°F) −10.0
(14)
−5.8
(21.6)
1.0
(33.8)
11.2
(52.2)
18.8
(65.8)
23.4
(74.1)
26.1
(79)
25.8
(78.4)
19.0
(66.2)
11.8
(53.2)
0.4
(32.7)
−6.8
(19.8)
9.6
(49.3)
Daily mean °C (°F) −15.3
(4.5)
−10.9
(12.4)
−4.1
(24.6)
4.6
(40.3)
11.9
(53.4)
16.7
(62.1)
19.1
(66.4)
18.4
(65.1)
12.1
(53.8)
5.4
(41.7)
−4.5
(23.9)
−12.0
(10.4)
3.5
(38.3)
Average low °C (°F) −20.5
(−4.9)
−15.9
(3.4)
−9.3
(15.3)
−1.9
(28.6)
4.9
(40.8)
9.9
(49.8)
12.1
(53.8)
11.0
(51.8)
5.2
(41.4)
−1.2
(29.8)
−9.4
(15.1)
−17.1
(1.2)
−2.7
(27.1)
Record low °C (°F) −42.2
(−44)
−41.0
(−41.8)
−41.1
(−42)
−30.6
(−23.1)
−13.3
(8.1)
−3.9
(25)
−2.2
(28)
−2.2
(28)
−13.3
(8.1)
−20.6
(−5.1)
−34.0
(−29.2)
−42.0
(−43.6)
−42.2
(−44)
Precipitation mm (inches) 18.0
(0.709)
13.4
(0.528)
20.3
(0.799)
29.7
(1.169)
54.2
(2.134)
72.9
(2.87)
64.3
(2.531)
46.0
(1.811)
40.4
(1.591)
22.8
(0.898)
16.7
(0.657)
20.2
(0.795)
418.8
(16.488)
Source: Environment Canada[14]

Economy[edit]

Weyburn is the largest inland grain gathering point in Canada. Well over half a million tons of grain pass through the Weyburn terminals each year. Oil and gas exploration make up the other major component of the economy.[15]

Culture[edit]

The Soo Line Historical Museum (c. 1910) is a Municipal Heritage Property under Saskatchewan's Heritage Property Act.[16]

Weyburn is also home to the world's first curling museum, the Turner Curling Museum.[17]

Education[edit]

Elementary and secondary[edit]

The public school system, South East Cornerstone School Division #209, operates the following schools:

  • Assiniboia Park Elementary School
  • Haig School
  • Queen Elizabeth School
  • Souris School
  • Weyburn Junior High School
  • Weyburn Comprehensive High School

The separate school system, Holy Family Roman Catholic Separate School Division #140, operates the following school:

  • St. Michael School

Post-secondary[edit]

Southeast Regional College offers technical, trade and non-degree programs, as well as distance learning from the University of Regina and University of Saskatchewan.

Other[edit]

The Weyburn Public Library is a branch of the Southeast Regional Library system.[18]

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Weyburn is located at the junction of highways 13, 35 and 39. The Weyburn Airport is located northeast of the city.

Utilities[edit]

Electricity is provided by SaskPower and natural gas is provided by SaskEnergy. The city maintains its own water treatment plant[19] and waste management system.[20] Telephone and internet services are provided by both SaskTel and Access Communications.

Health care[edit]

The Weyburn General Hospital is operated by the SunCountry Health Region.[21]

Public safety[edit]

The Weyburn Police Service provides law enforcement for the city.[22] Fire protection services are provided by the Weyburn Fire Department.[23]

Sports and recreation[edit]

Weyburn is the home of the Weyburn Red Wings of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL). Weyburn is also home to the Beavers of the Western Major Baseball League, a collegiate summer baseball league located in the prairie provinces of Canada. In addition, weyburn is home to the largest amateur wrestling club in Saskatchewan. [weyburn cobra wrestling club]

Local media[edit]

Noteworthy Weyburnites[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AISRI Dictionary Database Search--prototype version. Assiniboine.". Retrieved 2012-07-07. 
  2. ^ "Where 'Weyburn' the name originates". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  3. ^ McLennon, David (2006). "Weyburn". Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Great Plains Research Center. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  4. ^ "Weyburn Security Bank". Canada's Historic Places – a Federal Provincial and Territorial Collaboration. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  5. ^ "About Radville". The Town of Radville, Saskatchewan. Radville Economic Development Committee. 2002–2004. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  6. ^ Adamson, J (5 November 2003). "Canadian Maps: May 1948 Waghorn's Guide. Post Offices in Man. Sask. Alta. and West Ontario.". Online Historical Map Digitization Project. Rootsweb. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  7. ^ "Weyburn: An Archaeology of Madness". Internet Movie Database. Amazon.com. 2004. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  8. ^ "2011 Community Profiles". Canada 2011 Census. Statistics Canada. July 5, 2013. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  9. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-16. 
  10. ^ "2001 Community Profiles". Canada 2001 Census. Statistics Canada. February 17, 2012. Retrieved 2011-07-16. 
  11. ^ "Saskatchewan Road Map RV Travel Guide: #6 Canada / United States Border to Regina". Mile By Mile Media. 2007. Retrieved 2009-02-11. 
  12. ^ "Canadian Rural Partnership — Rural Development – Public – Private Partnerships in Rural and Northern Canada Study – Appendix C – List of Projects". Government of Canada. 2005-09-26. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  13. ^ "Water Control – Saskatchewan Dams and Reservoirs". Saskatchewan Watershed Authority. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  14. ^ Environment Canada – Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000—Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 27 July 2012
  15. ^ "Weyburn... The Opportunity City!" (PDF). City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  16. ^ Soo Line Historical Museum. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 October 2014.
  17. ^ "Turner Curling Museum". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  18. ^ "Weyburn Public Library Branch". Southeast Regional Library. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  19. ^ "Water Treatment Plant". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  20. ^ "Refuse Collection and Disposal". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  21. ^ "Weyburn General Hospital". SunCountry Health Region. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  22. ^ "Weyburn Police Service". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  23. ^ "Weyburn Fire Department". City of Weyburn. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  24. ^ "Readerlink". Glacier Media Group. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°39′40″N 103°51′09″W / 49.66111°N 103.85250°W / 49.66111; -103.85250