1965 24 Hours of Le Mans

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1965 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners

The 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 33rd Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on 19 and 20 June 1965. It was also the twelfth round of the World Sportscar Championship.

After the disappointing results of the previous year’s race, Ford returned with an improved version of its GT. There were 11 Fords or Ford-engined cars in the field. To meet that challenge Ferrari had no less than 12 of their cars. Porsche dominated the medium-engined category with seven cars and Alpine-Renault likewise dominated the small-engine categories with six entries.

Despite a strong start, in the end the Fords’ unreliability let them down again and it was an easy victory for Ferrari for the sixth successive year. After the failure of the works team, the winners were Masten Gregory and Jochen Rindt in the North American Racing Team (NART) car – the first non-works team to win since Ecurie Ecosse in 1957. It was also the first international race victory for Goodyear tyres.[1] Perhaps surprisingly given their domination of the race it would prove to be, to date, the last Ferrari victory at Le Mans.[1]

Le Mans in 1965

Regulations[edit]

In the year since the last race, plans had got underway to develop a permanent track. Charles Deutsch, erstwhile French car manufacturer, was the design consultant for the project that eventually became the Bugatti Circuit. After the dangerous accident in the previous year’s race when a car had crashed into the busy pits, protective barriers were put in front of each pit, although the pit-lane itself was still exposed.[2] Otherwise the only significant change was that the fuel tank on cars with an engine bigger than 5.0 litres was increased to 160 litres (35 gallons).[3][4] There were slight tweaks to the calculation of the two Indices and the minimum engine size was set at 1000cc.[4]

Entries[edit]

The ACO received 89 entries but after the selection process, withdrawals and no-shows there were 51 cars at the start. The proposed entry list comprised:

Category Classes Prototype
Entries
GT
Entries
Total
Entries
Large-engines 5.0+, 5.0, 4.0, 3.0L 20 (+1 reserve) 8 28
Medium-engines 2.5, 2.0, 1.6L 8 8 (+3 reserves) 16
Small-engines 1.3, 1.15, 1.0L 7 (+1 reserve) 4 (+1 reserve) 11
Total Cars 35 (+2 reserves) 20 (+4 reserves) 55

This year there was a renewed interest from the manufacturers and their works teams with 42 works-supported entries amongst the starters.[2]

After a slow start to the season, Ferrari introduced the new P2 design from Mauro Forghieri at the April test weekend, and the following 1000 km Monza race. A range of V12 engines were fitted: The works team had two 4.0-litre 410 bhp open-top cars for F1 world champion John Surtees and former winner Ludovico Scarfiotti, and sports-car specialists Mike Parkes and Jean Guichet. They also ran a 3.3-litre 350 bhp closed-top coupé for Bandini/Biscaldi. Ferrari’s regular customer teams, the British Maranello Concessionaires ran a 4.4-litre variant for Jo Bonnier/David Piper. The North American Racing Team (NART) ran a 365 P2 built around a previous year's P chassis with updated aerodynamics and featured a 4.4 L SOHC V12. It was given to NART regular Pedro Rodriguez with Nino Vaccarella.[5]

Enzo Ferrari was furious when the CSAI, the Italian motor-racing body, would not assist to GT-homologate his 250 LM (the 1964 race-winning car) and vowed to pull his SEFAC Ferrari works team out of the GT Championship. Meanwhile there were five of the car’s successor, the 275 LM, entered by the customer teams.[1] This included NART (Masten Gregory/Jochen Rindt), Maranello Concessionaires (Bianchi/Salmon), Ecurie Francorchamps, Scuderia Filipinetti and Pierre Dumay’s private entry. Finally, Ferrari also entered a new Dino prototype, the 166 P, with a 1.6-litre V6 engine.

After the departure of Eric Broadley and Lola Cars, Ford put its racing organisation under Shelby American, with car production and development handled by Kar Kraft in the USA and Ford Advanced Vehicles in the UK (run by John Wyer with a number of ex-Aston Martin staff).[6] After no wins in the 1964 season, the new year had started with a win for Ford at Daytona.[7] The new Mk II (also known as the “X-car”) was sent from FAV across to Kar Kraft to get the new engine fitted – the massive 7-litre, 450 bhp, NASCAR racing engine based on a Ford Galaxie block. Ready just in time for Le Mans, two cars would be raced by Phil Hill/Chris Amon and Ken Miles/Bruce McLaren.[8][9] Meanwhile FAV was tasked with production of the requisite 50 GT40s for homologation. On Shelby's initiative, the GT40s were now fitted with the same 380 bhp 4.7-litre engine as the Cobras [10] (except for the Filipinetti entry) and the Colotti gearbox that proved unreliable was replaced by the more robust German-made ZF gearbox. Four cars came to Le Mans: FAV used Alan Mann Racing with Innes Ireland / John Whitmore. Shelby American supported the Rob Walker Racing Team (Maglioli/Bondurant) and the Swiss Scuderia Filipinetti (Müller/Bucknum) who were both also entering Ferraris. Ford France ran an open-top spyder variant for Maurice Trintignant/Guy Ligier[11][12]

Once again Maserati France’s John Simone commissioned the company to develop a new car for racing. The Tipo 59 was built in only 7 weeks, with a mid-mounted 5-litre engine in a ‘birdcage’ frame. Replacing the destroyed Tipo 59, it left no time to test before the race for its drivers Jo Siffert and Jochen Neerpasch The final big-engine entry was the returning Iso Grifo A3C. Originally there were to be three but two cars had been wrecked earlier in the year at Sebring.


Porsche had got their desired 185 bhp flat-six engine fitted for their 904 GTS cars, alongside the flat-eight (225 bhp) with three works cars entered and a spare.[13] Opposing them were two British cars – a privately entered Elva and the return of the Rover turbine, first seen in the 1963 race, now categorised as equivalent to 1992cc. It had a new coupé body and ceramic rotary generators as heat exchangers which halved its fuel consumption. It would be driven by F1 drivers Graham Hill and Jackie Stewart[14]

Curiously, in the small-engine categories, Alpine was the only French manufacturer present. A new model, the M65 had aerodynamic tailfins and a new 1.3-litre Gordini engine that developed 135 bhp pushing it to 250 kp/h (155 mph). It was given to Mauro Bianchi/Henri Grandsire. The other four works cars were a mix of engines and body styles.[15] Their opposition were a pair of the latest Sebring Sprites from Austin Healey. Fitted with the 1293cc engine in the Mini-Cooper S they could reach 240 kp/h (148 mph)[16]


In the GT classes Ferrari were now the underdog after being beaten by the Shelby Cobras the previous year, and the races since. Five of the six Shelbys that had been made were at Le Man, prepared by Alan Mann Racing: two for Shelby American, and one each for Ford France, Scuderia Filipinetti and AC Cars themselves.[17][12] For his part, after his fit of pique, Ferrari homologated his new road-car the 275 GTB. The racing version had the 3.3-litre V12 engine extended to 300 bhp and lightened with magnesium castings. After protests from Carroll Shelby were upheld for being significantly lighter than the production car – 1100 kg - ballast had to be added.[18] Cars were being prepared for Ecurie Francorchamps and Scuderia Sant Ambroeus.

In the smaller GT classes were the 2-litre Porsche 904s with the homologated 4-cylinder engine. Autodelta, Alfa Romeo’s racing division, brought the Giulia TZ/2 rebodied by Zagato. Its 1.6-litre engine was tuned to 170 bhp it could 245 kp/h (150 mph).[19] Finally there was the newly homologated Triumph Spitfire. The factory brought four cars to the race.[19]

Practice[edit]

Fastest car at the April test-weekend was brand new 330 P2 – John Surtees putting in a lap of 3:35, fully five seconds quicker than the Fords and other Ferraris.[20] However the weekend was overshadowed by the death of Lloyd Casner in the rain on the Saturday. Casner, with his Camoradi team, was a long-time Maserati campaigner. Breaking at the end of the Mulsanne straight, his Tipo 151/3 speared off the track and rolled, possibly when braking on the slick white-paint road markings. Casner was thrown from the car and died later from head injuries in hospital.[21]

For the first time in the race’s history the initial practice session on race week had to be cancelled. A severe storm felled trees and flooded parts of the circuit. The ACO rescheduled an extra session on the Saturday instead.[3][22] Phil Hill, in the big 7-litre Ford, put in a blistering fastest lap of 3:33, fully 30 seconds faster than the best practice lap from only four years earlier. Surtees was second fastest, two seconds slower, in the rival Ferrari ahead of Bondurant’s and Miles’ Fords.[3][12] Dan Gurney had the quickest GT car – his Shelby Cobra was 12th with a 3:51.3, just ahead of the 3:55.0 of Willy Mairesse in the Belgian Ferrari GTB. In the next days, additional stabilising fins were added to the two GT40X’s.[12]

The fastest Porsche was the flat-8 of Gerhard Mitter who put in a 3:59.4 to qualify 18th ahead of the other Cobras and the Maserati. Mauro Bianchi, in the new Alpine, was quickest of the small cars coming in 35th with a 4:20.0.[23] In the end only 51 cars took the start when the small 1-litre Abarth failed to qualify.

Race[edit]

Start[edit]

After a wet week, race-day was sunny and hot with a huge crowd.[10] It was also the first time the American audience had live coverage of the race.[8] Although having set fastest time, Chris Amon took the start and Phil Hill was the TV guest. As it was, when the live-feed failed Hill took over commentating duties.[10]

Siffert got his Maserati away first, followed by the three Fords of Amon, Bondurant and McLaren. Last away was Colin Davis whose Porsche prototype refused to start for two minutes.[10][24] The two New Zealanders, McLaren and Amon, led the first lap with Surtees up to third as the Maserati fell back.[10] On the fourth lap Siffert planted the Maserati into the haybales at Tertre Rouge. When he finally got back to the pits the car was retired with damage to the oil tank and suspension. It was an underwhelming end to Maserati’s presence at Le Mans.[21][25] But his was not the first retirement: the Ferrari Dino was gone. Baghetti had over-revved the engine terminally damaging it.[26] Teodoro Zeccoli put his Alfa Romeo in the sandtrap at Mulsanne. He excited the spectators by stripping to his underwear in a long, unsuccessful attempt to dig it out.[19][10][25]

Back at the front, McLaren and then Amon set about building a lead on the Ferraris, setting new lap records. After two hours only the top four cars were now on the lead lap with Miles ahead of the Ferraris of Scarfiotti, Bonnier and Parkes.[25] But going into the third hour it all started going wrong for Ford. Hill had already fallen away with clutch problems costing 40 minutes in the pits and the French Ford had broken its gearbox when Trintignant had missed a gearchange.[27] The Filipinetti and Walker cars went out with blown head gaskets on the same lap, and when the McLaren/Miles car broke its gearbox the Ford challenged was beaten in only three hours.[3] Small consolation was Phil Hill’s new lap record of 3:37.5 as he vainly attempted to make up the 10 laps of lost time.[27]

This now left the race to Ferrari – the three works cars battled for the lead with the Maranello car of Bonnier/Piper. Fifth was the Gurney/Grant Cobra. Both the leading Porsche, of Mitter/Davis, and Alpine of Bianchi/Grandsire were out within three hours – with clutch and gearbox problems respectively. In the fourth hour, Gregory brought the NART Ferrari into the pits misfiring. However after changing the distributor, losing 30 minutes, the car was ready again. Gregory found Rindt changed and ready to leave. With nothing to lose they agreed to push flat-out, rejoining in 18th.[28][29]

Night[edit]

As the sun was setting came the only major accident of the race. Dutchman Rob Slotemaker went off at the fast Maison Blanche corner but was unhurt. His Triumph Spitfire was the same car that had careered towards the pits in the previous year’s race when Mike Rothschild had been overcome by exhaust fumes.[19]

After seeing off the Fords, the Ferraris also started having problems. First to fall was the Maranello car. An exhaust broke and Bonnier, choking from the fumes, bought the car in from third to retire as night fell.[5] The gearbox of Parkes/Guichet got jammed in fifth gear. During the night, all of the P2s got delayed by cracks in their brake discs, which in turn gave problems in suspension, each losing 30-60 minutes or more in getting the issues fixed.[27]

The Cobras had been running very well – at 2am the two Shelby-entered cars were running 4th and 5th, Johnson ahead of Gurney. But the head-gasket problem in the Fords also affected two of the Cobra engines including Johnson’s. The French entry had been afflicted with clutch issues. Coming up to half-time, the Gurney/Grant car's motor mounts began to crack and the strain of the engine vibration eventually broke the crankshaft.[17][27]

As the leaders were having troubles, the 275LMs kept running reliably. By halfway, the surprise leader was the French privateer Pierre Dumay chased hard by the NART car of Gregory/Rindt (catching them by at least 5 seconds a lap after the earlier delay[1][28]) and the Ecurie Francorchamps GTB of “Beurlys”/Mairesse. Parkes and Guichet had charged back to fourth ahead of the Porsches of Klass/Glemser and Linge/Nöcker. There were only 27 cars left running.[30]

Morning[edit]

Soon before 8am the Alpine of previous class-winner Roger Delageneste and veteran Jean Vinatier was retired with ignition problems when comfortably leading the class and running 16th overall. This had just followed the loss of the smallest car in the field, the fellow works Alpine M63B that had been leading the Thermal Index, when it was stopped by a broken conrod.[15]

At 8am, Gosselin had completed 232 laps, with Parkes and Rindt just a lap behind. Mairesse was fourth 3 laps further back with Nöcker in fifth (223 laps), Surtees (221) Vaccarella (220) then Koch, Spoerry and Pon all on 217 laps rounding out the top-10.[10] Against the odds, the privateers held the lead for ten hours until just after midday. A tyre blowout at speed on the Mulsanne Straight did severe damage to the rear bodywork. Dumay got the car back to pits but crucial time was lost with the panelbeating.[3] By the time they rejoined, Rindt and Gregory had a five-lap lead.

With less than three hours to go the little Austin-Healey Sprite of Rauno Aaltonen and Clive Baker, which was looking good for the two Index prizes after the demise of the Alpines, broke its gearbox.[16][24] Soon after the weakened transmission of the Parkes/Guichet P2 also finally gave out, with them having fallen to fifth.[5][4] After their hard charging, the leaders were also nursing a failing transmission. Gregory, in his last stint, was letting the clutch out in corners to coast through them.[28]

Finish and post-race[edit]

In the end, despite the fragile differential, the NART car cruised to victory. It packed up completely on the slow-down lap back to the paddock.[28] They kept their five-lap lead over the Dumay/Gosselin car. Three laps further back, and first GT, was Mairesse and “Beurlys” in the Ecurie Francorchamps Ferrari GTB.

Ed Hugus, the reserve driver, declared many years later that he actually drove a whole shift in the winning LM. Just before dawn, Gregory had pitted unexpectedly exhausted and his glasses-vision impaired by the pre-dawn mist. However Rindt was sleeping somewhere and could not be found, so Hugus took over driving duties for a few hours. This was controversial because - according to the regulations- Gregory would not have been allowed to drive again once Hugus replaced him (which he actually did) and the car should have been disqualified. However, no one officially recorded it nor was Hugus credited with co-driving duties.[31] Hugus, from discretion or that he could not get through the crowd to the podium[1], never made public claims on this story, which was revealed only in late 2000s, when after his death one of his fans made public a letter written to him by the pilot giving all the details.[32]

Fourth was the works Porsche of Herbert Linge and Peter Nöcker. Their trouble-free run also netted them the Index of Performance prize ahead of the winning Ferrari. In fifth was their GT stablemate of Gerd Koch / Toni Fischhaber who in turn won the Index of Thermal Efficiency, despite having to be pushed over the line.[24][22][4]

After losing nearly two hours replacing their clutch in the middle of the night, the NART Ferrari of Rodriguez/Vaccarella was the only P2 to finish, coming in 7th, 28 laps behind the winner.[5] The only Ford-engined car to finish was the Sears/Thompson works Cobra in 8th. After a collision with an Alfa Romeo around midnight while running 5th, they had nursed their battered car with oil-pressure issues to the end over 30 laps behind the GT-winning Ferrari.[17]

Tenth, and first British car home, was the Rover-BRM turbine. It covered a lesser distance than in 1963 as an early off by Hill had sucked sand into the engine causing constant overheating issues. A notable experiment however the issues with fuel consumption and heat management meant the project was impractical for road application and cancelled. [14][4] In a race of attrition there were only fourteen finishers and British cars filled the final five places with two class wins. These included rally specialists Simo Lampinen and Jean-Jacques Thuner for Triumph’s final appearance.[19] It was the also the final appearance for MG for 40 years. Paddy Hopkirk and Andrew Hedges once again had a low-maintenance reliable race with a consecutive race finish.[16] It was a race of attrition with only 14 cars finishing. Surprisingly, for the first time ever, not a single French car finished the race.

So another debacle for Ford, with only one of the eleven Ford-engined cars finishing. A silver lining was, with a class win the next month at Reims, the Cobra-Ford clinched the GT Championship.[17] Later in the year Ferrari indeed sold a portion of his company, not to Ford, but to FIAT.[5]


Official results[edit]

Finishers[edit]

Results taken from Quentin Spurring's book, officially licensed by the ACO[33] Class Winners are in Bold text.

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Laps
1 P
4.0
21 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
Austria Jochen Rindt
(United States Ed Hugus[1][31][32])
Ferrari 275LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 348
2 P
4.0
26 France P. Dumay
(private entrant)
France Pierre Dumay
Belgium Gustave ‘Taf’ Gosselin
Ferrari 250LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 343
3 GT
4.0
24 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps Belgium Willy Mairesse
Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Ferrari 275 GTB Ferrari 3.3L V12 340
4 P
2.0
32 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Herbert Linge
Germany Peter Nöcker
Porsche 904/6 Porsche 1968cc F6 336
5 GT
2.0
36 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Gerhard ‘Gerd’ Koch
Germany Anton ‘Toni’ Fischhaber
Porsche 904/4 GTS Porsche 1968cc F4 325
6 P
4.0
27 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Dieter Spoerry
Switzerland Armand Boller
Ferrari 275LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 324
7 P
5.0
18 United States North American Racing Team Mexico Pedro Rodríguez
Italy Nino Vaccarella
Ferrari 365 P/P2 Spyder Ferrari 4.4L V12 320
8 GT
5.0
11 United Kingdom AC Cars Ltd. United Kingdom Jack Sears
United States Dick Thompson
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 304
9 P
+5.0
3 Italy Iso Grifo Prototipi Bizzarrini France Régis Fraissinet
France Jean de Mortemart
Iso Grifo A3C Chevrolet 5.4L V8 303
10 P
2.0
31 United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation United Kingdom Graham Hill
United Kingdom Jackie Stewart
Rover-BRM Rover 1992cc Turbine 284
11 GT
2.0
39 United Kingdom British Motor Corporation United Kingdom Paddy Hopkirk
United Kingdom Andrew Hedges
MG MGB Hardtop MG 1801cc S4 283
12 P
1.3
49 United Kingdom Donald Healey Motor Company Australia Paul Hawkins
United Kingdom John Rhodes
Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite BMC 1293cc S4 278
13 GT
1.15
60
(reserve)
United Kingdom Standard-Triumph Ltd. Switzerland Jean-Jacques Thuner
Finland Simo Lampinen
Triumph Spitfire Triumph 1147cc S4 274
14 GT
1.15
54 United Kingdom Standard-Triumph Ltd. Belgium Claude Dubois
France Jean-François Piot
Triumph Spitfire Triumph 1147cc S4 263

Did Not Finish[edit]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Laps Reason
DNF P
4.0
20 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom Mike Parkes
France Jean Guichet
Ferrari 330 P2 Spyder Ferrari 4.0L V12 315 Gearbox
(23hr)
DNF P
1.3
48 United Kingdom Donald Healey Motor Company Finland Rauno Aaltonen
United Kingdom Clive Baker
Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite BMC 1293cc S4 256 Gearbox
(22hr)
DNF P
4.0
19 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom John Surtees
Italy Ludovico Scarfiotti
Ferrari 330 P2 Spyder Ferrari 4.0L V12 225 Gearbox
(18hr)
DNF GT
2.0
37 France A. Veuillet
(private entrant)
France Robert Buchet
Netherlands Ben Pon
Porsche 904/4 GTS Porsche 1968cc F4 224 Oil leak
(17hr)
DNF P
4.0
22 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC Italy Lorenzo Bandini
Italy Giampiero Biscaldi
Ferrari 275 P2 Ferrari 3.3L V12 221 Valves
(17hr)
DNF GT
1.6
44 Luxembourg Equipe Grand Ducale
Luxembourgeoise
Luxembourg Nicholas Koob
France Alain Finkelstein
Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ/2 Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 218 Engine
(19hr)
DNF GT
1.6
41 Italy Autodelta SpA Italy Roberto Bussinello
France Jean Rolland
Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ/2 Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 217 Engine
(18hr)
DNF GT
5.0
9 United States Shelby-American Inc. United States Dan Gurney
United States Jerry Grant
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 204 Crankshaft
(16hr)
DNF P
2.0
35 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Günter Klass
Germany Dieter Glemser
Porsche 904/6 Porsche 1991cc F6 202 Camshaft
(16hr)
DNF P
1.3
47 France Société Automobiles
Alpine
France Roger Delageneste
France Jean Vinatier
Alpine A110 M64 Renault-Gordini 1296cc S4 196 Ignition
(16hr)
DNF GT
1.3
55 France Société Automobiles
Alpine
France Jacques Cheinisse
France Jean-Pierre Hanrioud
Alpine A110 GT4 Renault-Gordini 1108cc S4 196 Clutch (21hr)
DNF P
1.15
61
(reserve)
France Société Automobiles
Alpine
France Robert Bouharde
France Pierre Monneret
Alpine A110 M63B Renault-Gordini 1002cc S4 187 Ignition
(16hr)
DNF GT
5.0
10 United States Shelby-American Inc. United States Bob Johnson
United States Tom Payne
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 158 Head gasket
(12hr)
DSQ P
1.15
51 France Société Automobiles
Alpine
France Roger Masson
France Guy Verrier
Alpine A110 M64 Renault-Gordini 1150cc S4 148 premature water
change
DNF P
4.0
25 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps Belgium Gerhard Langlois van Ophem
Belgium “Eldé” (Leon Dernier)
Ferrari 275LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 146 Clutch (12hr)
DNF GT
2.0
38 France J. Franc
(private entrant)
France “Franc” (Jacques Dewes)
France Jean Kerguen
Porsche 904/4 GTS Porsche 1968cc F4 130 Out of fuel (10hr)
DNF GT
5.0
59
(reserve)
Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti United Kingdom Peter Sutcliffe
United Kingdom Peter Harper
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 126 Head gasket
(10hr)
DNF P
1.15
50 France Société Automobiles
Alpine
France Philippe Vidal
United States Peter Revson
Alpine A110 M64 Renault-Gordini 1150cc S4 116 Engine
(10hr)
DNF GT
5.0
12 France Ford France S.A. France Jo Schlesser
United States Allen Grant
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 111 Clutch (10hr)
DNF P
5.0
17 United Kingdom Maranello Concessionaires Ltd. United Kingdom David Piper
Sweden Jo Bonnier
Ferrari 365 P2 Ferrari 4.4L V12 101 Ignition
(9hr)
DNF P
4.0
23 United Kingdom Maranello Concessionaires Ltd. Belgium Lucien Bianchi
United Kingdom Mike Salmon
Ferrari 275LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 99 Gearbox
(8hr)
DNF P
+5.0
2 United States Shelby-American Inc. United States Phil Hill
New Zealand Chris Amon
Ford GT40X Ford 7.0L V8 89 Clutch (7hr)
DNF GT
5.0
14 United Kingdom Ford Advanced Vehicles United Kingdom Sir John Whitmore
United Kingdom Innes Ireland
Ford GT40 Ford 4.7L V8 72 Head gasket
(6hr)
DNF GT
1.15
52 United Kingdom Standard Triumph Ltd. United Kingdom David Hobbs
Netherlands Rob Slotemaker
Triumph Spitfire Triumph 1147cc S4 71 Accident
(7hr)
DNF P
+5.0
1 United States Shelby-American Inc. United Kingdom Ken Miles
New Zealand Bruce McLaren
Ford GT40X Ford 7.0L V8 45 Gearbox
(4hr)
DNF P
1.3
46 France Société Automobiles
Alpine
Belgium Mauro Bianchi
France Henri Grandsire
Alpine M65 Renault-Gordini 1296cc S4 32 Gearbox
(3hr)
DNF P
+5.0
6 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Herbert Müller
United States Ronnie Bucknum
Ford GT40 Ford 5.3L V8 29 Head gasket
(3hr)
DNF P
5.0
7 United Kingdom Rob Walker Racing Team United States Bob Bondurant
Italy Umberto Maglioli
Ford GT40 Ford 4.7L V8 29 Head gasket
(3hr)
DNF P
2.0
30 United Kingdom Anglian Racing Developments United Kingdom Richard Wrottesley
United Kingdom Tony Lanfranchi
Elva GT160 BMW 1991cc S4 29 Clutch (4hr)
DNF GT
1.6
42 Italy Autodelta SpA Italy “Geki” (Giacomo Russi)
Italy Carlo Zuccoli
Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ/2 Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 22 Oil pipe (2hr)
DNF P
2.0
33 Germany Porsche System Engineering United Kingdom Colin Davis
Germany Gerhard Mitter
Porsche 904/8 Porsche 1985cc F8 20 Clutch (4hr)
DNF GT
2.0
62
(reserve)
France C. Poirot
(private entrant)
France Christian Poirot
Germany Rolf Stommelen
Porsche 904/4 GTS Porsche 1968cc F4 13 Gearbox (2hr)
DNF P
5.0
15 France Ford France S.A. France Maurice Trintignant
France Guy Ligier
Ford GT40 Spyder Ford 4.7L V8 11 Gearbox (2hr)
DNF GT
1.3
53 United Kingdom Standard Triumph Ltd. United Kingdom Peter Bolton
United Kingdom Bill Bradley
Triumph Spitfire Triumph 1147cc S4 6 Engine (1hr)
DNF P
5.0
8 France J. Simone
(private entrant)
Switzerland Jo Siffert
Germany Jochen Neerpasch
Maserati Tipo 65 Maserati 5.0L V8 3 Accident damage
(1hr)
DNF P
1.6
40 Italy SpA Dino SEFAC Italy Giancarlo Baghetti
Italy Mario Casoni
(Ferrari) Dino 166P Ferrari 1593cc V6 2 Engine (1hr)
DNF GT
1.6
43 Italy Autodelta SpA Italy Teodoro Zeccoli
France José Rosinski
Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ/2 Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 1 Accident (2hr)

Did Not Practise[edit]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Reason
DNQ P
1.15
56 France Abarth France France Claude Ballot-Léna
France Franck Ruata
Abarth 1000 SP Fiat 998cc S4 Did not qualify
DNA P
+5.0
4 Italy Iso Grifo Prototipi Bizzarrini Belgium Pierre Noblet
Switzerland Edgar Berney
Iso Grifo A3C Chevrolet 5.4L V8 Did not arrive
DNA P
+5.0
5 Italy Iso Grifo Prototipi Bizzarrini Switzerland Silvio Moser
Portugal Mario Cabral
Iso Grifo A3C Chevrolet 5.4L V8 Did not arrive
DNA GT
5.0
16 United Kingdom John Willment Automobiles Australia Frank Gardner
United Kingdom Alan Rees
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 Did not arrive
DNA P
2.0
34 Germany Porsche System Engineering Porsche 904/6 Porsche 1991cc F6 Did not arrive
DNA P
1.6
45 France Société d’Etudes & Construction France Alain Bertaut
France André Guilhaudin
CD 3 Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 Did not arrive
DNP GT
4.0
57
(reserve)
United States North American Racing Team Ferrari 275 GTB Ferrari 3.3L V12 Not required
DNP P
4.0
63
(reserve)
Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps Ferrari 275LM Ferrari 3.3L V12 Not required
DNP GT
2.0
66
(reserve)
Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Dieter Spoerry
Switzerland Jacques Calderari
Porsche 904/4 GTS Porsche 1968cc F4 Not required
DNP GT
1.6
69
(reserve)
France C. Laurent
(private entrant)
France Claude Laurent
(France Pierre Gelé
Lotus Elan Lotus 1598cc S4 Not required

Class Winners[edit]

Class Prototype
Winners
Class GT Winners
Prototype
>5000
#3 Iso Grifo A3C Fraissinet / de Mortemart Grand Touring
>5000
no entrants
Prototype
5000
#18 Ferrari 365 P/P2 Spyder Rodriguez / Vaccarella Grand Touring
5000
#11 AC Cobra Daytona Coupé Sears / Thompson
Prototype
4000
#21 Ferrari 275LM Gregory / Rindt Grand Touring
4000
#24 Ferrari 275 GTB Mairesse / “Beurlys”
Prototype
3000
no entrants Grand Touring
3000
no entrants
Prototype
2500
no entrants Grand Touring
2500
no entrants
Prototype
2000
#32 Porsche 904/6 Linge / Nöcker * Grand Touring
2000
#36 Porsche 904/4 GTS Koch / Fischhaber
Prototype
1600
no finishers Grand Touring
1600
no finishers
Prototype
1300
#49 Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite Hawkins / Rhodes Grand Touring
1300
no entrants
Prototype
1150
no finishers Grand Touring
1150
#60 Triumph Spitfire Thuner / Lampinen
  • Note: setting a new Distance Record.

Index of Thermal Efficiency[edit]

[34]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Score
1 GT
2.0
36 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Gerhard ‘Gerd’ Koch
Germany Anton ‘Toni’ Fischhaber
Porsche 904/4 GTS 1.10
2 P
4.0
26 France P. Dumay
(private entrant)
France Pierre Dumay
Belgium Gustave ‘Taf’ Gosselin
Ferrari 275LM 1.07
3 P
1.3
49 United Kingdom Donald Healey Motor Company Australia Paul Hawkins
United Kingdom John Rhodes
Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite 1.05
4 P
2.0
32 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Herbert Linge
Germany Peter Nöcker
Porsche 904/6 1.03
5= P
4.0
21 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
Austria Jochen Rindt
Ferrari 275LM 1.00
5= GT
4.0
24 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps Belgium Willy Mairesse
Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Ferrari 275 GTB 1.00
5= GT
2.0
39 United Kingdom British Motor Corporation United Kingdom Paddy Hopkirk
United Kingdom Andrew Hedges
MG MGB Hardtop 1.00
8 P
4.0
27 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Dieter Spoerry
Switzerland Armand Boller
Ferrari 275LM 0.95
9= GT
5.0
11 United Kingdom AC Cars Ltd. United Kingdom Jack Sears
United States Dick Thompson
AC Cobra Daytona Coupé 0.91
9= P
2.0
31 United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation United Kingdom Graham Hill
United Kingdom Jackie Stewart
Rover-BRM 0.91
  • Note: Only the top ten positions are included in this set of standings.

Index of Performance[edit]

Taken from Moity’s book.[35]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Score
1 P
2.0
32 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Herbert Linge
Germany Peter Nöcker
Porsche 904/6 1.248
2 P
4.0
21 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
Austria Jochen Rindt
Ferrari 275LM 1.220
3 GT
2.0
36 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Gerhard ‘Gerd’ Koch
Germany Anton ‘Toni’ Fischhaber
Porsche 904/4 GTS 1.211
4 P
4.0
26 France P. Dumay
(private entrant)
France Pierre Dumay
Belgium Gustave ‘Taf’ Gosselin
Ferrari 275LM 1.201
5 GT
4.0
24 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps Belgium Willy Mairesse
Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Ferrari 275 GTB 1.190
6 P
4.0
27 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Dieter Spoerry
Switzerland Armand Boller
Ferrari 275LM 1.136
7 P
1.3
49 United Kingdom Donald Healey Motor Company Australia Paul Hawkins
United Kingdom John Rhodes
Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite 1.120
8 P
5.0
18 United States North American Racing Team Mexico Pedro Rodriguez
Italy Nino Vaccarella
Ferrari 365 P/P2 Spyder 1.096
9 GT
2.0
39 United Kingdom British Motor Corporation United Kingdom Paddy Hopkirk
United Kingdom Andrew Hedges
MG MGB Hardtop 1.068
10 P
2.0
31 United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation United Kingdom Graham Hill
United Kingdom Jackie Stewart
Rover-BRM 1.056
  • Note: Only the top ten positions are included in this set of standings. A score of 1.00 means meeting the minimum distance for the car, and a higher score is exceeding the nominal target distance.


Statistics[edit]

Taken from Quentin Spurring's book, officially licensed by the ACO

  • Fastest Lap in practice – P.Hill, #2 Ford GT40X – 3:33.0secs; 227.51 km/h (141.37 mph)
  • Fastest Lap – P.Hill, #2 Ford GT40X – 3:37.5secs; 222.80 km/h (138.44 mph)
  • Distance – 4,677.11 km (2,906.22 mi)
  • Winner’s Average Speed – 194.88 km/h (121.09 mph)
  • Attendance – 300 000+[12]

Challenge Mondial de Vitesse et Endurance Standings[edit]

As calculated after Le Mans, Round 8 of 9, with the best 6 results counting (full score in brackets)

Pos Manufacturer Points
1 Italy Ferrari 49 (53)
2 West Germany Porsche 22 (24)
3 United States Ford 19
4 United Kingdom AC-Ford 14
5= United States Chaparrel 9
5= Australia Brabham 9
7 United Kingdom Lola 6
8 Italy iso 2
9 Italy Abarth 1
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f Spurring 2010, p.178-9
  2. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.175
  3. ^ a b c d e Spurring 2010, p.176-7
  4. ^ a b c d e Moity 1974, p.99-101
  5. ^ a b c d e Spurring 2010, p.181
  6. ^ Fox 1973, p.196
  7. ^ Laban 2001, p.148
  8. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.182-3
  9. ^ Fox 1973, p.197
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Clarke 2009, p.157: Car & Driver Sept 1965
  11. ^ Spurring 2010, p.186
  12. ^ a b c d e Clarke 2009, p.156: Car & Driver Sept 1965
  13. ^ Spurring 2010, p.184
  14. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.191
  15. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.196-7
  16. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.198
  17. ^ a b c d Spurring 2010, p.188
  18. ^ Spurring 2010, p.185
  19. ^ a b c d e Spurring 2010, p.195
  20. ^ Spurring 2010, p.203
  21. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.189
  22. ^ a b Clarke 2009, p.166: Autosport Jun25 1965
  23. ^ Spurring 2010, p.201
  24. ^ a b c Clarke 2009, p.161: Autosport Jun25 1965
  25. ^ a b c Clarke 2009, p.162: Autosport Jun25 1965
  26. ^ Clarke 2009, p.142: Road & Track Sept 1964
  27. ^ a b c d Clarke 2009, p.158: Car & Driver Sept 1965
  28. ^ a b c d Henry 1988, p.101-4
  29. ^ Fox 1973, p.198
  30. ^ Clarke 2009, p.165: Autosport Jun25 1965
  31. ^ a b Pete Vack (12 July 2006). "Ed Hugus, Obituary and Appreciation". www.velocetoday.com. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  32. ^ a b "News: Ed Hugus". www.jochen-rindt.at. Retrieved 16 February 2015. 
  33. ^ Spurring 2010, p.2
  34. ^ Spurring 2010, p.171
  35. ^ Moity 1974, p.172

References[edit]

  • Armstrong, Douglas – English editor (1966) Automobile Year #13 1965-66 Lausanne: Edita S.A.
  • Clarke, R.M. - editor (2009) Le Mans 'The Ferrari Years 1958-1965' Cobham, Surrey: Brooklands Books ISBN 1-85520-372-3
  • Clausager, Anders (1982) Le Mans London: Arthur Barker Ltd ISBN 0-213-16846-4
  • Fox, Charles (1973) The Great Racing Cars & Drivers London: Octopus Books Ltd ISBN 978-0-7064-0213-1
  • Henry, Alan (1988) Fifty Famous Motor Races Northamptonshire: Patrick Stephen Ltd ISBN 0-85059-937-7
  • Laban, Brian (2001) Le Mans 24 Hours London: Virgin Books ISBN 1-85227-971-0
  • Moity, Christian (1974) The Le Mans 24 Hour Race 1949-1973 Radnor, Pennsylvania: Chilton Book Co ISBN 0-8019-6290-0
  • Spurring, Quentin (2010) Le Mans 1960-69 Yeovil, Somerset: Haynes Publishing ISBN 978-1-84425-584-9

External links[edit]

  • Racing Sports Cars – Le Mans 24 Hours 1965 entries, results, technical detail. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • Le Mans History – Le Mans History, hour-by-hour (incl. pictures, YouTube links). Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • World Sports Racing Prototypes – results, reserve entries & chassis numbers. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • Team Dan – results & reserve entries, explaining driver listings. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • Unique Cars & Parts – results & reserve entries. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • Formula 2 – Le Mans 1965 results & reserve entries. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • YouTube – Pt 1 of 3 colour film (20mins total). Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • YouTube – 30min colour film following the Triumph team. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • YouTube – 6min b/w footage of the last lap. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • YouTube – 3min modern film of the race-winning Ferrari. Retrieved 28 February 2018
  • (in French) Le Mans 1965 in Automobile Historique n°48, May 2005