1968 Philadelphia Phillies season

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1968 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
General manager(s) John J. Quinn
Manager(s) Gene Mauch, George Myatt, Bob Skinner
Local television WFIL
Local radio WCAU
(By Saam, Bill Campbell, Richie Ashburn)
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The 1968 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses, 21 games behind the NL pennant-winning Cardinals.

Offseason[edit]

Regular season[edit]

The Phillies were scheduled to open the 1968 season on April 9, 1968 in Los Angeles. However, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968, leading to days of national unrest. President Johnson declared Monday, April 8, a national day of mourning, and the funeral was scheduled for April 9. The Dodgers initially refused to postpone the game leading Phillies GM John Quinn and President Bob Carpenter to announce that the Phillies would not play on April 9 even under threat of forfeit. On April 7, Quinn told reporters, "Under the rules, the game can be forfeited and we could be fined. But we have made our final decision. We will not play."[4] In consultation with NL President Warren Giles, the Dodgers eventually agreed and postponed the game.[5] The Phillies opened April 10, 1968 with a Chris Short 2 to 0 shutout of the Dodgers.[6]

On July 28, 1968, George Culver of the Cincinnati Reds pitched a 6–1 no-hitter against the Phillies in the second game of a doubleheader at Connie Mack Stadium.[7]

Season standings[edit]

National League W L GB Pct.
St. Louis Cardinals 97 65 -- .599
San Francisco Giants 88 74 9 .543
Chicago Cubs 84 78 13 .519
Cincinnati Reds 83 79 14 .512
Atlanta Braves 81 81 16 .500
Pittsburgh Pirates 80 82 17 .494
Los Angeles Dodgers 76 86 21 .469
Philadelphia Phillies 76 86 21 .469
New York Mets 73 89 24 .451
Houston Astros 72 90 25 .444

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1968 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
Team ATL CHC CIN HOU LAD NYM PHI PIT SF STL
Atlanta 8–10 10–8 11–7 9–9 12–6–1 11–7 6–12 9–9 5–13
Chicago 10–8 7–11 10–8 12–6 8–10 9–9 10–8 9–9–1 9–9
Cincinnati 8–10 11–7 9–9 9–9 10–8 11–7 10–8–1 8–10 7–11
Houston 7–11 8–10 9–9 11–7 10–8 9–9 5–13 8–10 5–13
Los Angeles 9–9 6–12 9–9 7–11 7–11 10–8 10–8 9–9 9–9
New York 6–12–1 10–8 8–10 8–10 11–7 8–10 9–9 7–11 6–12
Philadelphia 7–11 9–9 7–11 9–9 8–10 10–8 9–9 9–9 8–10
Pittsburgh 12–6 8–10 8–10–1 13–5 8–10 9–9 9–9 7–11 6–12
San Francisco 9–9 9–9–1 10–8 10–8 9–9 11–7 9–9 11–7 10–8
St. Louis 13–5 9–9 11–7 13–5 9–9 12–6 10–8 12–6 8–10


Notable transactions[edit]

Game log[edit]

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1968 Game Log[9]
Overall Record: 76–86

Roster[edit]

1968 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Money, DonDon Money 4 13 3 .231 0 2

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Fryman, WoodieWoodie Fryman 34 213.2 12 14 2.78 151

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Boozer, JohnJohn Boozer 38 2 2 5 3.67 49

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA San Diego Padres Pacific Coast League Bob Skinner and Bobby Klaus
AA Reading Phillies Eastern League Frank Lucchesi
A Tidewater Tides Carolina League Bob Wellman
A Spartanburg Phillies Western Carolinas League Bobby Malkmus
Short-Season A Huron Phillies Northern League Dallas Green
Short-Season A Eugene Emeralds Northwest League Nolan Campbell

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Reading[23]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Doc Edwards page at Baseball-Reference
  2. ^ Woodie Fryman page at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Manny Trillo page at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ "Phillies Won't Play; Risk Forfeit". St. Petersburg Times. April 8, 1968. Retrieved January 4, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Dodgers Finally Agree with Phils". Herald-Tribune. April 9, 1968. p. 18. Retrieved January 4, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Phillies Win". Lewiston (Maine) Daily Sun. April 11, 1968. p. 22. Retrieved January 4, 2010. 
  7. ^ "No-Hitter for Culver, Reds Sweep Phils". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. July 29, 1968. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  8. ^ Buddy Schultz page at Baseball Reference
  9. ^ "1968 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com. 
  10. ^ "Phillies Risk Forfeit in Opener With LA: Dodgers Insist Playing Tuesday: Brass Say Club Won't Play Because of Dr. King Rites". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press (AP). April 8, 1968. pp. 29, 31. Retrieved July 18, 2015. All other Tuesday openers in the major leagues have been postponed. ... In addition, all of Sunday's exhibition finales, with the exception of the Dodgers-Indians game at San Diego, Calif., were cancelled at [sic] the sports world joined in a national day of mourning for King. 
  11. ^ "World of Sports In King Homage: Dodgers Join Opener Delay; Horse Tracks Halt Programs". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press (AP). April 9, 1968. p. 17. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Dodgers Go Along, Play Wednesday". Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press (AP). April 9, 1968. p. 1, part 2. Retrieved July 18, 2015. Dr. King's death resulted in the postponement of the Monday games and the entire slate of Tuesday's openers. It still is touch and go as to whether some of the games will be played Wednesday in cities that have been torn by riots. 
  13. ^ "HHH For LBJ?: Baseball Opens With Ten Games". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press (AP). April 10, 1968. p. 20, 21. Retrieved July 18, 2015. The postponement was unparalleled in baseball history, a tribute not even accorded President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who died a few days before the 1945 season began. 
  14. ^ "Baseball". Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Journal. April 24, 1968. p. 19. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  15. ^ "The Majors". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. May 13, 1968. p. 30. Retrieved July 21, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "Baseball". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. May 17, 1968. p. 18. Retrieved July 20, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Baseball Standings". Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Sentinel. May 24, 1968. p. 1, part 2. Retrieved July 20, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Baseball". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. May 30, 1968. p. 14. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  19. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. May 31, 1968. p. 17. Retrieved July 22, 2015. 
  20. ^ "Baseball". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. June 13, 1968. p. 38. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  21. ^ "Baseball". Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Journal. June 18, 1968. p. 14, part 2. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  22. ^ Feeney, Charley (September 11, 1968). "Shep Helps Blass Gain New Form: Steve Aiming For 15th Win Against Phils". Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. 23. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  23. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References[edit]