2000 Washington Huskies football team

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2000 Washington Huskies football
Pac-10 co-champion
Rose Bowl champion
Rose Bowl, W 34–24 vs. Purdue
Conference Pacific-10
Ranking
Coaches No. 3
AP No. 3
2000 record 11–1 (7–1 Pac-10)
Head coach Rick Neuheisel (2nd season)
Offensive coordinator Keith Gilbertson (1st season)
Defensive coordinator Tim Hundley (2nd season)
MVP None
Captain Marques Tuiasosopo (2nd year)
Captain Chad Ward
Captain Larry Tripplett
Home stadium Husky Stadium
(c. 72,500, FieldTurf)
Seasons
← 1999
2001 →
2000 Pacific-10 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
No. 3 Washington $+   7 1         11 1  
No. 4 Oregon State  %+   7 1         11 1  
No. 7 Oregon +   7 1         10 2  
Stanford   4 4         5 6  
UCLA   3 5         6 6  
Arizona State   3 5         6 6  
Arizona   3 5         5 6  
USC   2 6         5 7  
Washington State   2 6         4 7  
California   2 6         3 8  
  • $ – BCS representative as conference champion
  • % – BCS at-large representative
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll

The 2000 Washington Huskies football team represented the University of Washington in the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Huskies were led by second-year head coach Rick Neuheisel and played their home games on campus in Seattle at Husky Stadium. Washington lost only one game,[1] and won the Rose Bowl on New Year's Day.[2][3]

Season summary[edit]

Washington opened the 2000 season with a 44–20 victory over Idaho. Fourth-ranked Miami traveled to Seattle the next week and senior QB Marques Tuiasosopo threw for 223 yards and ran for 45 as the Huskies handed the Hurricanes their only loss of the season, 34–29.[4]

The following week, Neuheisel led UW against his former team, the Colorado Buffaloes, at Folsom Field in Boulder. The Huskies celebrated their coach's homecoming with a 17–14 victory.[5] Border rival Oregon spoiled Washington's hopes for a perfect season with a 23–16 setback in the wind in Eugene,[1] but the Huskies responded the next week with a dramatic 33–30 victory over eventual Fiesta Bowl champion Oregon State in the only loss of their season.[6] In the next five weeks, the Huskies battled back from second half deficits in every game, including a 31–28 win in the rain at Stanford that was marked with tragedy; safety Curtis Williams (1978–2002) was paralyzed after a neck injury late in the third quarter.[7] For the remainder of the season, players and coaches wore the letters "CW" on helmets and uniforms in honor of him;[8][9] he died from complications less than 19 months later.[10][11][12][13]

After several second half comebacks, Washington was finally able to win a game easily with a 51–3 victory over Washington State in the Apple Cup in Pullman, setting a record for largest margin of victory (48 points) in the series. (The 1990 team led by 52 points, also in Pullman, but reserves allowed a late touchdown.)[14][15]

The win over the Cougars, paired with an Oregon State win over Oregon in the Civil War, put the Huskies in the Rose Bowl. Tuiasosopo earned Rose Bowl MVP honors as he led Washington to a 34–24 win over Purdue and Drew Brees,[2][3] and the Huskies finished third in the polls.[16][17]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 2 12:30 PM Idaho* No. 14 Husky StadiumSeattle, WA FSN W 44–20   70,117
September 9 12:30 PM No. 4 Miami (FL)* No. 15 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA [4] ABC W 34–29   74,157
September 16 12:30 PM at Colorado* No. 9 Folsom FieldBoulder, CO [5] ABC W 17–14   50,454
September 30 12:30 PM at No. 20 Oregon No. 6 Autzen StadiumEugene, OR [1] (Rivalry) ABC L 16–23   46,153
October 7 7:00 PM No. 23 Oregon State No. 13 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA [6] FSN W 33–30   73,145
October 14 7:00 PM at Arizona State No. 11 Sun Devil StadiumTempe, AZ FSN W 21–15   61,370
October 21 3:30 PM California No. 9 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA FSN W 36–24   70,113
October 28 2:00 PM at Stanford No. 9 Stanford StadiumStanford, CA [7] FSN W 31–28   31,300
November 4 12:30 PM Arizona No. 8 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA ABC W 35–32   70,411
November 11 12:30 PM UCLA No. 7 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA ABC W 35–28   71,886
November 18 3:30 PM at Washington State No. 6 Martin StadiumPullman, WA [14][15] (Apple Cup) FSN W 51–3   33,010
January 1 1:30 PM vs. No. 14 Purdue* No. 4 Rose BowlPasadena, CA [2][3] (Rose Bowl) ABC W 34–24   94,392
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Pacific Time.

Game summaries[edit]

Idaho[edit]

Miami (FL)[edit]

#4 Miami (FL) at #15 Washington
1 2 3 4 Total
Miami (FL) 3 0 19 7 29
Washington 7 14 6 7 34
  • Date: September 9
  • Location: Husky Stadium • Seattle, Washington
  • Game attendance: 74,157

Source:[4][18]

NFL Draft selections[edit]

Player Position Round Pick NFL Club
Marques Tuiasosopo Quarterback 2 59 Oakland Raiders
Elliott Silvers Tackle 5 132 San Diego Chargers
Jeremiah Pharms Linebacker 5 134 Cleveland Browns
Hakim Akbar Defensive Back 5 163 New England Patriots
Chad Ward Guard 6 170 Jacksonville Jaguars

Source:[19]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Marques Tuiasosopo, Rose Bowl Player of the Game[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Ducks flying high". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). October 1, 2000. p. 1A. 
  2. ^ a b c Nadel, John (January 2, 2001). "Huskies follow leader to bowl victory". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. p. 1E. 
  3. ^ a b c Blanchette, John (January 2, 2001). "Command performance". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. C1. 
  4. ^ a b c "No. 4 Miami leaves Seattle with bite marks". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. September 10, 2000. p. 7G. 
  5. ^ a b Mossman, John (September 17, 2000). "Huskies give Neuheisel a happy homecoming". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. p. 6G. 
  6. ^ a b Rodman, Bob (October 8, 2000). "Beavers just miss upset bid". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1F. 
  7. ^ a b "Husky rally trumps Cardinal 31-28". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. October 29, 2000. p. 5B. 
  8. ^ Blanchette, John (January 2, 2001). "Huskies have surprise locker room visitor". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. C2. 
  9. ^ Melley, Brian (May 14, 2002). "Curtis Williams: Huskies say goodbye". Kitsap Sun. (Bremerton, Washington). Associated Press. 
  10. ^ McCauley, Janie (May 7, 2002). "Paralyzed Washington football player dies". Associated Press. p. 1E. 
  11. ^ "Former Husky Curtis Williams passes away". University of Washington Athletics. May 6, 2002. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  12. ^ Miller, Ted (May 6, 2002). "Paralyzed Husky is dead at 24". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Curtis E. Williams". Find a Grave. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  14. ^ a b Bergum, Steve (November 18, 1990). "Huskies regain their bite". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. C1. 
  15. ^ a b Grummert, Dale (November 18, 1990). "Huskies bomb Cougars out of their misery, 55-10". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 1B. 
  16. ^ "Final poll". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. January 4, 2001. p. C1. 
  17. ^ "College football: final polls". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). January 4, 2001. p. 5E. 
  18. ^ USA Today
  19. ^ http://www.pro-football-reference.com/draft/2001.htm
  20. ^ Mike Gastineau (October 2010). The Great Book of Seattle Sports Lists. ReadHowYouWant.com. pp. 527–. ISBN 978-1-4587-7974-8.