2013 FY27

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2013 FY27
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Scott Sheppard
Chad Trujillo
(807)
Discovery date 17 March 2013
announced: 31 March 2014
Designations
MPC designation 2013 FY27
TNO, SDO[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 7
Observation arc 1054 days (2.89 yr)
Aphelion 81.8481 AU (12.24430 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 36.0577 AU (5.39416 Tm) (q)
58.9529 AU (8.81923 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.38836 (e)
452.65 yr (165332 d)
209.4711° (M)
0° 0m 7.839s /day (n)
Inclination 32.9890° (i)
187.1719° (Ω)
139.623° (ω)
Earth MOID 35.111 AU (5.2525 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.4167 AU (4.69987 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 780 km (Brown)[4]
530[a]–1100[b] km[3][5]
900 km[6]
0.1 to 0.4? (assumed range)
0.15 (theoretically expected value)[4]
22.1
3.0 (JPL/MPC)[3]
3.3 (Brown)[4]

2013 FY27, also written 2013 FY27, is a trans-Neptunian object[3] that belongs to the scattered disc (like Eris).[6] Its discovery was announced on 31 March 2014.[1] It has an absolute magnitude (H) of 3.0,[3] which makes it very likely to be a dwarf planet.[4] Assuming an albedo of 0.15, it would be approximately 850 kilometres (530 mi) in diameter.[5] It is the ninth-intrinsically-brightest known trans-Neptunian object,[7] and is the largest unnumbered minor planet as of May 2017.

2013 FY27 will come to perihelion around 2198,[c] at a distance of about 36 AU.[3] It is currently near aphelion, 80 AU from the Sun, and, as a result, it has an apparent magnitude of 22.[1] Its orbit has a significant inclination of 33°.[3]

First observed on 17 March 2013, it has an observation arc of about one year.[3] It came to opposition in early March 2014.

The sednoid 2012 VP113 and the scattered-disc object 2013 FZ27 were discovered by the same survey as 2013 FY27 and were announced within about a week of one another.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.4
  2. ^ Assuming an albedo of 0.1
  3. ^ The uncertainty in the year of perihelion passage is ≈56 years.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MPEC 2014-F82 : 2013 FY27". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2014-03-31. Retrieved 2014-03-31.  (K13F27Y)
  2. ^ "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2013 FY27)" (last observation: 2014-03-26; arc: 1.02 years). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Mike Brown, How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? Archived October 18, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. (assumes H = 3.3)
  5. ^ a b Dan Bruton. "Conversion of Absolute Magnitude to Diameter for Minor Planets". Department of Physics & Astronomy (Stephen F. Austin State University). Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  6. ^ a b Lakdawalla, Emily (2014-04-02). "More excitement in the outermost solar system: 2013 FY27, a new dwarf planet". www.planetary.org/blogs. The Planetary Society. Retrieved 18 January 2017. 
  7. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (TNO) and H < 3.1 (mag)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2014-03-31. 
  8. ^ a b "AstDyS-2, Asteroids - Dynamic Site". Retrieved 2017-08-25. Objects with distance from Sun over 59 AU 

External links[edit]