2020 New Brunswick general election

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2020 New Brunswick general election

← 2018 September 14, 2020 Next →

49 seats in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick
25 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Turnout66.14% (Decrease 1.20 pp)
  First party Second party
  Blaine Higgs 2019 (cropped).jpg Kevin Vickers.jpg
Leader Blaine Higgs Kevin Vickers
Party Progressive Conservative Liberal
Leader since October 22, 2016 April 24, 2019
Leader's seat Quispamsis Ran in Miramichi (lost)
Last election 22 seats, 31.89% 21 seats, 37.80%
Seats before 20 20
Seats won 27 17
Seat change Increase7 Decrease3
Popular vote 147,790 129,025
Percentage 39.34% 34.35%
Swing Increase7.45% Decrease3.45%

  Third party Fourth party
  David Coon Cropped.jpg Kris Austin (cropped).jpg
Leader David Coon Kris Austin
Party Green People's Alliance
Leader since September 22, 2012 June 5, 2010
Leader's seat Fredericton South Fredericton-Grand Lake
Last election 3 seats, 11.88% 3 seats, 12.58%
Seats before 3 3
Seats won 3 2
Seat change Steady Decrease1
Popular vote 57,252 34,526
Percentage 15.24% 9.19%
Swing Increase3.36% Decrease3.39%

New Brunswick general election 2020 - Results by Riding.svg
Popular vote by riding. As this is an FPTP election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote, but instead via results by each riding.

Premier before election

Blaine Higgs
Progressive Conservative

Premier after election

Blaine Higgs
Progressive Conservative

The 2020 New Brunswick general election was held on September 14, 2020 to elect members of the 60th New Brunswick Legislature. The Progressive Conservative Party of New Brunswick, led by Blaine Higgs, won a majority government.

The writs of election were issued by Lieutenant Governor Brenda Murphy on August 17, 2020, after a request was made by Premier Blaine Higgs to dissolve the legislature.

The election was scheduled to take place on October 17, 2022, as determined by the fixed-date provisions of the Legislative Assembly Act, which requires a general election to be held every four years on the third Monday in October.[1] However, Premier Higgs called a snap election after negotiations failed with the other parties that would have avoided an election until the fixed date in 2022 or the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.[2]

At 8:55 p.m. ADT, CBC News declared a Progressive Conservative majority government.[3]

Background[edit]

Aftermath of the 2018 election[edit]

The 2018 provincial election resulted in no party winning a majority of seats in the legislature for the first time since the 1920 provincial election. On election night, Blaine Higgs claimed victory for the Progressive Conservative Party, saying his team had received a mandate from New Brunswickers; however, Liberal Party leader and incumbent premier Brian Gallant stated his intention to remain in office with a minority government by securing support on a vote-by-vote basis.[4] Over the following days, Lieutenant Governor Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau met with both leaders and gave permission to Gallant to continue in office and attempt to seek the confidence of the Legislative Assembly;[5] while Higgs was told that if Gallant was unable to secure the confidence of the Assembly, Higgs would be called on to form government.[6]

After the election, both Kris Austin of the People's Alliance and David Coon of the Green Party were noncommittal in their support.[7][8] Gallant pursued a partnership with the Green Party and ruled out any arrangement with the Progressive Conservative Party or People's Alliance because Gallant did not believe that they shared the Liberal Party’s “values”.[9] Higgs initially ruled out any formal agreements with other parties, but later said that a four-year agreement would be ideal for stability.[10] On September 28, 2018, Austin agreed to support a Progressive Conservative minority government on a "bill-by-bill basis" for eighteen months, though no formal agreement was made.[11]

On November 2, 2018, the Progressive Conservatives introduced a motion of no confidence in the Legislative Assembly, resulting in a 25-23 vote against the Liberals. Subsequently, Gallant resigned as Premier and recommended to the Lieutenant Governor that Higgs be given the opportunity to form government.[12] Higgs' minority government was sworn into office on November 9, 2018.[13]

On November 15, 2018, Gallant announced his resignation as leader of the Liberal Party.[14] He was succeeded by Kevin Vickers on April 24, 2019.[15]

Speculation of an early election[edit]

The PC minority government's seat total dropped to 20 after the death of MLA Greg Thompson on September 10, 2019 and the resignation of Deputy Premier Robert Gauvin on February 14, 2020.[16] Gauvin's resignation came after the PC government announced health reforms, including the nightly closure of six hospital emergency rooms across the province as a cost reduction measure.[16] Despite the Progressive Conservatives quickly backtracking on their proposals, the Liberals and the Greens said that they would not support the government at the next confidence vote, while the People's Alliance specifically did not rule out a vote of non-confidence.[16][17][18] The next confidence vote was scheduled for March 20, 2020 to approve the PC government's proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year;[19] however, by that time, the People's Alliance decided to continue supporting the government and Green MLAs were allowed to vote freely on the budget.[19] Furthermore, after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, all parties decided to co-operate with each other—thus, avoiding a spring election.[20]

However, by the summer, COVID-19 cases had stayed low for several weeks and Premier Blaine Higgs began to hint at the possibility of a fall election, arguing that stability was required for the next phase of the pandemic and economic recovery.[21] The Progressive Conservatives carried out candidate riding nominations on August 8, 2020, continuing speculation of when an election might be called.[22] On the following Monday, Higgs made an offer to the opposition parties to avoid an election until 2022 or the end of the pandemic;[21] however, negotiations ultimately failed and a snap election was called on August 17, 2020.[2]

Summary of seat changes[edit]

Changes in seats held (2018–2020)
Seat Before Change
Date Member Party Reason Date Member Party
Saint Croix 10 September 2019 Greg Thompson  PC Death
Shediac Bay-Dieppe 7 October 2019 Brian Gallant  Liberal Resignation
Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou 14 February 2020 Robert Gauvin  PC Left the party  Independent

Results[edit]

27 17 3 2
Progressive Conservative Liberal Green PANB
Summary of the 2020 Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick election
Political party Party leader MLAs Votes
Candidates 2018 Dissol. 2020 ± # % ± (pp) % where
running
Progressive Conservative[a] Blaine Higgs 49 22 20 27 +7 147,790 39.34% +7.45pp 39.34%
Liberal[a] Kevin Vickers 49 21 20 17 -3 129,025 34.35% -3.45pp 34.35%
Green David Coon 47 3 3 3 ±0 57,252 15.24% +3.36pp 16.00%
People's Alliance[a] Kris Austin 36 3 3 2 -1 34,526 9.19% -3.39pp 12.51%
New Democratic Mackenzie Thomason (interim) 33 0 6,220 1.66% -3.35pp 2.46%
  KISS Gerald Bourque 4 0 139 0.04% -0.06pp 0.43%
  Independent[b] 9 1 0 -1 685 0.18% -0.56pp 1.32%
  Vacant 2
Ballots rejected 1,266
Total 227 49 49 49 376,903 100.00%
Eligible voters and turnout 569,862 66.14
Source : GNB
Popular vote
PC
39.34%
Liberal
34.35%
Green
15.24%
People's Alliance
9.19%
New Democratic
1.66%
Others
0.22%
Seats summary
PC
55.10%
Liberal
34.69%
Green
6.12%
People's Alliance
4.08%

Incumbent MLAs who were defeated[edit]

Party Name Riding Year elected Seat held by party since Defeated by Party
New Brunswick Liberal Association Monique LeBlanc Moncton East 2014 2014 Daniel Allain Progressive Conservative Party of New Brunswick
Stephen Horsman Fredericton North 2014 2014 Jill Green
Andrew Harvey Carleton-Victoria 2014 2014 Margaret Johnson
People's Alliance of New Brunswick Rick DeSaulniers Fredericton-York 2018 2018 Ryan Cullins

Results by region[edit]

Party Name Northern Miramichi Southeastern Southern Capital Region Upper River Valley Total
  Progressive
Conservative
Seats 0 1 7 11 6 2 27
Popular Vote % % % % % % 39.34%
  Liberal Seats 8 1 5 3 17
Popular Vote % % % % % % 34.35%
  Green Seats 2 1 3
Popular Vote % % % % % % 15.24%
  People's Alliance Seats 1 1 2
Popular Vote % % % % % % 9.19%
  New Democratic Seats
Popular Vote % % % % % % 1.66%
  Other Seats
Popular Vote % % % % % % 0.22%
Total seats 8 3 14 11 8 5 49

Detailed analysis[edit]

Position attained in seats contested
Party Seats Second Third Fourth
Liberal 17 17 9 6
Progressive Conservative 27 14 8
Green 3 12 24 8
People's Alliance 2 6 7 18
New Democratic 1 5
Other 2
Principal races, according to 1st and 2nd-place results
Parties Seats
 Green  Liberal 2
 Green  Progressive Conservative 1
 Liberal  Green 5
 Liberal  Progressive Conservative 12
 People's Alliance  Liberal 1
 People's Alliance  Progressive Conservative 1
 Progressive Conservative  Green 7
 Progressive Conservative  Liberal 14
 Progressive Conservative  People's Alliance 6
Total 49

Campaign[edit]

Election call and initial reaction[edit]

At his election announcement, Progressive Conservative leader Blaine Higgs blamed the Liberals for the failure of negotiations that would have avoided an election until 2022 or the end of the pandemic.[23] In response, Liberal leader Kevin Vickers and Green Party leader David Coon criticized Higgs for calling an election during a pandemic.[23] Vickers insisted that the negotiations would have given unlimited power to Higgs and the PCs, and an election should have been held after the end of the pandemic.[23] Meanwhile, People's Alliance leader Kris Austin asked New Brunswickers to vote for his party to ensure accountability of the next government by electing another minority legislature.[2][23]

Impact of COVID-19[edit]

From the outset of the campaign, Higgs was asked about the potential impact of COVID-19 on the election.[2] Higgs initially caused confusion when he said that he would be able to suspend the election, if necessary,[2] even though, New Brunswick's Chief Electoral Officer Kim Poffenroth said that an election could not be stopped after it has been called.[2] Additionally, Higgs suggested that he could turn to the COVID-19 emergency order declared by the province under the Emergency Measures Act (EMA), despite the fact that election timelines are exempt from the EMA.[2] However, Higgs remained firm that he did not intend to suspend the election.[2] Higgs also shared that, because of COVID-19, PC candidates were instructed to avoid door-to-door campaigning and mailbox flyers during the election.[2][23]

Candidate controversies[edit]

Roland Michaud, PC candidate in Victoria-La Vallée, was ordered to withdraw from the election by Blaine Higgs after a transphobic meme posted on Michaud's Facebook page became public;[24] Michaud chose to remain and run as an independent.[25] Michaud remained on the ballot with his original affiliation because the papers have already been printed, as did other repudiated candidates.

John Wayne Gardner, Liberal candidate in Saint Croix, was ousted by party leader Kevin Vickers after an anti-LGBTQ2I tweet from 2017 came to light; Gardner announced later the same day that he would continue to run as an independent.[26]

Louis Bérubé, PC candidate in Restigouche West, was allowed to remain as party candidate after transphobic social media comments mentioned in a 2016 Acadie Nouvelle story[27] resurfaced.[28] The party cited Bérubé's earlier apologies for his comments and his successful vetting before running for the Green Party in the 2019 election as reasons for his retention.

Heathere Collins, PANB candidate in Memramcook-Tantramar, was dropped by party leader Kris Austin after 2019 anti-Muslim Tweets came to light.[29] The candidate, whose Elections NB registration disagreed with her Twitter account about how to spell her first name, remained in the election.

Opinion polls[edit]

Voting Intentions in New Brunswick since the 2018 Election
Polling Firm Last Day of Polling Link PC Liberal PA Green NDP
Election 2020 September 14, 2020 HTML 39.34 34.35 9.19 15.24 1.66
Forum Research Inc. September 13, 2020 HTML 37 30 8 21 4
Mainstreet Research September 12, 2020 HTML 37 30 7 21 4
EKOS September 12, 2020 HTML 32 32 10 18 4
Oraclepoll Research September 3, 2020 PDF 42 33 2 18 6
MQO Research August 30, 2020 HTML 43 27 5 17 6
Mainstreet Research August 27, 2020 PDF 38 32 7 19 4
Leger/Acadie Nouvelle August 26, 2020 PDF 40 32 7 13 6
Narrative Research August 23, 2020 HTML 44 33 2 14 7
Angus Reid May 24, 2020 HTML 39 26 13 17 4
Narrative Research May 20, 2020 HTML 48 30 3 15 5
Innovative Research Group May 7, 2020 PDF 33 37 6 13 10
Narrative Research March 12, 2020 HTML 39 28 4 20 8
MQO Research February 27, 2020 PDF 37 31 4 21 4
Narrative Research November 22, 2019 HTML 37 31 3 21 7
Narrative Research August 23, 2019 PDF 36 29 8 18 6
Narrative Research June 13, 2019 HTML 42 25 6 18 8
MQO Research May 6, 2019 PDF 40 30 5 20 3
24 April 2019 Kevin Vickers becomes leader of the Liberal Party
Corporate Research Associates February 19, 2019 PDF 42 29 9 14 6
MQO Research February 10, 2019 PDF 46 32 8 11 3
Mainstreet Research January 15, 2019 HTML 40.2 27.3 12.4 15 4.5
Corporate Research Associates November 24, 2018 PDF 30 35 12 17 6
9 November 2018 Blaine Higgs is sworn in as Premier of New Brunswick leading a PC minority government, following the resignation of Brian Gallant and his Liberal minority government.
MQO Research November 5, 2018 PDF 36 29 11 21 3
2 November 2018 Premier Brian Gallant's Liberal minority government loses a non-confidence vote
Mainstreet Research November 2, 2018 HTML 33.7 33.7 12.7 15.7 3
Election 2018 September 24, 2018 HTML 31.89 37.80 12.58 11.88 5.01

Candidates[edit]

Retiring incumbents[edit]

The following sitting MLAs have announced that they would not seek re-election:

Legend

  • bold denotes cabinet minister, speaker or party leader
  • † denotes an incumbent who is not running for re-election or was defeated in nomination contest
  • # denotes an incumbent seeking re-election in a new district

NOTE: Candidates' names are as registered with Elections New Brunswick[35]

Northern[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Restigouche West Louis Bérubé
1247
15.4%
Gilles LePage
5022
62.2%
Charles Thériault
1755
21.7%
Travis Pollock (KISS)
56
0.7%
Gilles LePage
Campbellton-Dalhousie Charles D. Stewart
1369
19.7%
Guy H. Arseneault
4540
65.2%
Marie-Christine Allard
1054
15.1%
Guy Arseneault
Restigouche-Chaleur Louis Robichaud
1149
16.7%
Daniel Guitard
3823
55.7%
Marie Larivière
1896
27.6%
Daniel Guitard
Bathurst West-Beresford Anne Bard-Lavigne
1985
29.7%
René Legacy
3730
55.8%
Pierre Duguay-Boudreau
965
14.4%
Brian Kenny[36]
Bathurst East-Nepisiguit-Saint-Isidore Amanda Keast
1568
24.0%
Denis Landry
4163
63.8%
Robert Kryzsko
798
12.2%
Denis Landry
Caraquet Kevin J. Haché
985
12.0%
Isabelle Thériault
5928
72.3%
Marie-Christine Haché
1290
15.7%
Isabelle Thériault
Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou Jean-Gérard Chiasson
714
8.8%
Eric Mallet
6834
83.8%
Marie Leclerc
609
7.5%
Robert Gauvin#
Tracadie-Sheila Diane Carey
2059
23.2%
Keith Chiasson
6175
69.5%
Chris LeBlanc
645
7.3%
Keith Chiasson

Miramichi[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Miramichi Bay-Neguac Robert Trevors
2751
33.7%
Lisa Harris
3561
43.6%
Curtis Bartibogue
825
10.1%
Thomas L'Huillier
898
11.0%
Douglas Mullin
139
1.7%
Lisa Harris
Miramichi Charles Barry
1508
19.3%
Kevin Vickers
2239
28.6%
Joshua Shaddick
398
5.1%
Michelle Conroy
3527
45.1%
Eileen Clancy Teslenko
92
1.2%
Tristan Sutherland (Ind.)
54
0.7%
Michelle Conroy
Southwest Miramichi-Bay du Vin Jake Stewart
3887
48.0%
Josh McCormack
1760
21.7%
Art O'Donnell
2268
28.0%
Glenna Hanley
188
2.3%
Jake Stewart

Southeastern[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Kent North Stephen Robertson
1363
16.1%
Bertrand LeBlanc
2933
34.6%
Kevin Arseneau
4021
47.5%
Roger Richard (Ind.)
154
1.8%
Kevin Arseneau
Kent South Raymond (Bou) Duplessis
2817
30.2%
Benoit Bourque
5148
55.2%
Eva P. Rehak
996
10.7%
Lisa Godin
243
2.6%
Sue Shedd
118
1.3%
Benoît Bourque
Shediac Bay-Dieppe Mathieu Gérald Caissie
2971
30.6%
Robert Gauvin
5839
60.1%
Phillip Coombes
371
3.8%
Delphine Daigle
528
5.4%
Vacant
Shediac-Beaubassin-Cap-Pelé Marie-Paule Martin
1820
19.7%
Jacques LeBlanc
4949
53.7%
Gilles Cormier
2453
26.6%
Jacques LeBlanc
Memramcook-Tantramar Carole Duguay
1678
20.4%
Maxime Bourgeois
2902
35.3%
Megan Mitton
3425
41.6%
Heathere Collins[c]
192
2.3%
Jefferson George Wright (Ind.)
34
0.4%
Megan Mitton
Dieppe Patricia Arsenault
1680
22.1%
Roger Melanson
4564
60.2%
Mélyssa Boudreau
1142
15.1%
Pamela Boudreau
200
2.6%
Roger Melanson
Moncton East Daniel Allain
3525
45.2%
Monique LeBlanc
2759
35.4%
Phylomène Zangio
989
12.7%
Michel Norman Guitare
378
4.8%
Christopher Wanamaker
153
2.0%
Monique LeBlanc
Moncton Centre Jean Poirier
1642
26.1%
Rob McKee
2448
38.9%
Carole Chan
1725
27.4%
Aaron Richter
308
4.9%
James Caldwell
168
2.7%
Rob McKee
Moncton South Greg Turner
2734
42.1%
Tyson Milner
1966
30.3%
Josephine Watson
1245
19.2%
Marilyn Crossman-Riel
331
5.1%
Rebecca Rogers
220
3.4%
Cathy Rogers[37]
Moncton Northwest Ernie Steeves
4111
51.5%
Mark Black
2448
30.7%
Laura Sanderson
702
8.8%
Shawn Soucoup
493
6.2%
Cyprien Okana
229
2.9%
Ernie Steeves
Moncton Southwest Sherry Wilson
3679
52.1%
René Ephestion
1561
22.1%
Claire Kelly
927
13.1%
Susan Matthews
667
9.5%
Juliana McIntosh
224
3.2%
Sherry Wilson
Riverview R. Bruce Fitch
4695
60.1%
Heath Johnson
1281
16.4%
Rachel Pletz
800
10.2%
Troy Berteit
778
10.0%
John Nuttall
261
3.3%
R. Bruce Fitch
Albert Mike Holland
5040
62.3%
Kelley Nagle
921
11.4%
Jenny O'Neill
1056
13.1%
Sharon Buchanan
977
12.1%
James Wilson (Ind.)
90
1.1%
Mike Holland
Gagetown-Petitcodiac Ross Wetmore
4773
59.1%
John (Jake) Urquhart
867
10.7%
Marilyn Merritt-Gray
1003
12.4%
Craig Dykeman
1303
16.1%
Ryan Jewkes
131
1.6%
Ross Wetmore

Southern[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Sussex-Fundy-St. Martins Tammy Scott-Wallace
4366
56.3%
Cully Robinson
971
12.5%
Tim Thompson
969
12.5%
Jim Bedford
1321
17.0%
Jonas Lanz
129
1.7%
Bruce Northrup[38]
Hampton Gary E. Crossman
4351
60.5%
Carley Parish
1084
15.1%
John Carl Sabine
816
11.4%
Sharon Bradley-Munn
687
9.6%
Alex White
251
3.5%
Gary Crossman
Quispamsis Blaine M. Higgs
5697
68.1%
Robert Hunt
1225
14.6%
Addison Fach
528
6.3%
Sara Hall
414
4.9%
Caitlin Grogan
501
6.0%
Blaine Higgs
Rothesay Hugh J. (Ted) Flemming
4265
61.3%
Jason Hickey
1463
21.0%
Ann McAllister
719
10.3%
Mike Griffin
413
5.9%
Neville (NB) Barnett (Ind.)
44
0.6%
Liz Kramer (Ind.)
56
0.6%
Ted Flemming
Saint John East Glen Savoie
3507
56.4%
Phil Comeau
1639
26.3%
Gerald Irish
394
6.3%
Patrick Kemp
434
7.0%
Josh Floyd
248
4.0%
Glen Savoie
Portland-Simonds Trevor A. Holder
3170
55.1%
Tim Jones
1654
28.8%
Stefan Warner
483
8.4%
Darella (Lindsay) Jackson
282
4.9%
Erik Heinze-Milne
164
2.9%
Trevor Holder
Saint John Harbour Arlene Dunn
2181
41.4%
Alice (Ms McKim) McKim
1207
22.9%
Brent Harris
1224
23.2%
Tony Gunn
186
3.5%
Courtney Pyrke
309
5.9%
Mike (Dok) Cyr (Ind.)
47
0.9%
Arty Watson (Ind.)
114
2.2%
Gerry Lowe[39]
Saint John Lancaster K. Dorothy Shephard
3560
54.2%
Sharon Teare
1471
22.4%
Joanna Killen
938
14.3%
Paul Seelye
394
6.0%
Don Durant
201
3.1%
Dorothy Shephard
Kings Centre Bill Oliver
4583
61.5%
Paul Adams
911
12.2%
Bruce Dryer
1006
13.5%
William Edgett
693
9.3%
Margaret Anderson Kilfoil
254
3.4%
Bill Oliver
Fundy-The Isles-Saint John West Andrea Anderson-Mason
4740
66.5%
Tony Mann
726
10.2%
Lois P. Mitchell
686
9.6%
Vincent P. Edgett
688
9.6%
Sharon R. Greenlaw
291
4.1%
Andrea Anderson-Mason
Saint Croix Kathy Bockus
3570
45.2%
John Wayne Gardner[c]
401
5.1%
Kim Reeder
1238
15.7%
Rod Cumberland
2546
32.2%
Brad McKinney
147
1.9%
Vacant

Capital Region[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Oromocto-Lincoln-Fredericton Mary E. Wilson
3374
44.3%
Steven Burns
2072
27.2%
Gail Costello
1306
17.1%
Craig Rector
745
9.8%
Natasha M. Akhtar
127
1.7%
Mary E. Wilson
Fredericton-Grand Lake Roy Wiggins
2479
30.6%
Eldon Hunter
749
9.3%
Ken Washburn
1005
12.4%
Kris Austin
3759
46.4%
Greg Cook
87
1.1%
Grenville Woollacott (KISS)
18
0.2%
Kris Austin
New Maryland-Sunbury Jeff Carr
5342
57.8%
Chris Pelkey
1048
11.3%
Jen Smith
1463
15.8%
Morris Shannon
1254
13.6%
Chris Thompson
141
1.5%
Jeff Carr
Fredericton South Brian MacKinnon
2342
30.0%
Nicole Picot
895
11.5%
David Coon
4213
54.0%
Wendell Betts
234
3.0%
Geoffrey Noseworthy
117
1.5%
David Coon
Fredericton North Jill Green
3227
41.1%
Stephen Horsman
1464
18.7%
Luke Randall
2464
31.4%
Allen Price
591
7.5%
Mackenzie Thomason
100
1.3%
Stephen Horsman
Fredericton-York Ryan Cullins
3730
42.4%
Randy McKeen
872
9.9%
Melissa Fraser
2110
24.0%
Rick DeSaulniers
1991
22.6%
Steven J. LaForest
68
0.8%
Gerald Bourque (KISS)
24
0.3%
Rick DeSaulniers
Fredericton West-Hanwell Dominic Cardy
4726
52.9%
Chris Duffie
1510
16.9%
Susan Jonah
1745
19.5%
Mel Keeling
825
9.2%
Armand Cormier
131
1.5%
Dominic Cardy
Carleton-York Richard Ames
4750
57.8%
Robert Kitchen
940
11.4%
Louise Comeau
890
10.8%
Gary Lemmon
1524
18.6%
Jarrett Oldenburg
110
1.3%
Carl Urquhart[40]

Upper River Valley[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Progressive Conservatives   Liberal   Green   PANB   NDP Other
Carleton Bill Hogan
3536
47.9%
Theresa Blackburn
1239
16.8%
Greg Crouse
581
7.9%
Graham Gill
1909
25.8%
Shawn Oldenburg
80
1.1%
Andy Walton (KISS)
41
0.6%
Stewart Fairgrieve[41]
Carleton-Victoria Margaret Johnson
3330
45.2%
Andrew Harvey
2939
39.9%
Rowan Patrick Miller
372
5.1%
Terry Leigh Sisson
610
8.3%
Meriet Gray Miller
113
1.5%
Andrew Harvey
Victoria-La Vallée Roland Michaud[c]
2071
28.6%
Chuck Chiasson
4365
60.2%
Nathanaël Denis Lavoie
426
5.9%
André Jobin
292
4.0%
Danny Zolondek (Ind.)
92
1.3%
Chuck Chiasson
Edmundston-Madawaska Centre Joanne Bérubé Gagné
1380
19.6%
Jean-Claude (JC) D'Amours
5236
74.5%
Marco Morency
415
5.9%
Jean-Claude (JC) D'Amours
Madawaska Les Lacs-Edmundston Marie-Eve Castonguay
1763
25.6%
Francine Landry
4583
66.5%
Marie-Soleil Lussier
542
7.9%
Francine Landry

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Candidate total includes one candidate repudiated by the party who remained on the ballot with the party's affiliation due to ballot papers already being printed.
  2. ^ The province's single sitting independent chose to run for the Liberals.
  3. ^ a b c Candidate was publicly repudiated by his or her party but chose to remain in the election. Because ballot papers had already been printed candidate retained his or her original listed affiliation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. "An Act to Amend the Legislative Assembly Act". Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Poitras, Jacques (2020-08-17). "Blaine Higgs calls New Brunswick election for Sept. 14, despite pandemic". CBC News.
  3. ^ https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/elections/new-brunswick/2020/results/
  4. ^ MacDonald, Michael (September 24, 2018). "New Brunswick Tories win most seats, but Liberals will try to stay in power". CTV News. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  5. ^ Fraser, Elizabeth (September 25, 2018). "Liberals and PCs continue battle over who will govern N.B." CBC News. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
  6. ^ "New Brunswick Tory leader Blaine Higgs calls on Premier Brian Gallant to resign". The Canadian Press. September 27, 2018. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  7. ^ Donkin, Karissa (September 24, 2018). "People's Alliance wins 3 seats in 'significant breakthrough'". CBC News. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  8. ^ Fraser, Elizabeth (September 24, 2018). "David Coon will head back to house with 2 other Green MLAs". CBC News. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  9. ^ Fraser, Elizabeth (September 26, 2018). "Liberals court Greens for governing partnership". CBC News. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  10. ^ "Four-year deal between New Brunswick Tories, smaller party ideal for stability: Higgs". The Canadian Press. October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  11. ^ "People's Alliance agrees to support a PC government in N.B. 'bill by bill'". CBC News. September 28, 2018. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  12. ^ Brian Gallant's minority government defeated after losing confidence vote
  13. ^ Bisset, Kevin (November 9, 2018). "Blaine Higgs sworn-in as New Brunswick premier". The Canadian Press.
  14. ^ Brian Gallant resigns as N.B. Liberal leader after election loss
  15. ^ "Kevin Vickers officially acclaimed as leader of New Brunswick Liberals". CTV News. The Canadian Press. April 17, 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  16. ^ a b c Poitras, Jacques (14 February 2020). "Gauvin resigns as deputy premier, will sit as an independent". CBC News. Retrieved 14 February 2020.
  17. ^ Bissett, Kevin (2020-02-19). "N.B. prof says Tory backtrack on ER closures could prompt early election". CTV News.
  18. ^ Bissett, Kevin (2020-02-14). "New Brunswick deputy premier Robert Gauvin quits minority Tory government over health-care reforms". The Globe and Mail.
  19. ^ a b Brown, Laura (2020-03-03). "N.B. anticipates upcoming budget". CTV News.
  20. ^ Brown, Laura; April, Allan (2020-08-10). "N.B. premier proposes set election date deal to opposition parties". CTV News.
  21. ^ a b Poitras, Jacques (2020-08-10). "Higgs proposes deal to avoid general election until 2022 or end of COVID-19 pandemic". CBC News.
  22. ^ "PCs carry on with nominations in N.B. despite COVID-19 restrictions". CBC News. 2020-08-08.
  23. ^ a b c d e Brown, Laura; Van Horne, Ryan (2020-08-17). "New Brunswick premier calls early election during pandemic". CTV News.
  24. ^ Silberman, Alexandre; Harding, Gail (7 September 2020). "PC candidate Roland Michaud asked to withdraw after transphobic post". CBC News. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  25. ^ Perry, Brad (8 September 2020). "'Give Me A Chance': Ousted PC Candidate Running As Independent". CHSJ Country 94.1. Acadia Broadcasting Ltd. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  26. ^ Renic, Karla (8 September 2020). "Saint Croix Liberal candidate John Gardner out of the race after anti-LGBTQ2I+ post leaks". Global News. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  27. ^ Duval, Gilles (18 May 2016). "Transgenres: un artiste acadien émet des propos controversés". Acadie Nouvelle website (in French). p. 11. Retrieved 9 September 2020. The article also appears on page 11 of the 20 May print edition.
  28. ^ Renic, Karla (9 September 2020). "Tory candidate to remain on ballot after transphobic comment resurfaces". Global News. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  29. ^ Fraser, Elizabeth (9 September 2020). "People's Alliance drops candidate for making Islamophobic comments online". CBC News. Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  30. ^ "Brian Kenny". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-09-15.
  31. ^ Poitras, Jacques (19 June 2020). "Longtime PC MLA stepping down this fall". CBC news. Retrieved 15 September 2020.
  32. ^ "Gerry Lowe". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-09-15.
  33. ^ "Carl Urquhart". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-09-15.
  34. ^ "Rick McGuire". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-09-15.
  35. ^ "List of Candidates". Elections New Brunswick. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  36. ^ Kenny, Brian (18 August 2020). "WOW!". Facebook. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  37. ^ "Exclusive: Cathy Rogers Steps Down". Buzz Local Moncton/Riverview/Dieppe. Facebook. 17 August 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  38. ^ Poitras, Jacques (18 June 2020). "Longtime PC MLA stepping down this fall". CBC News. CBC/Radio-Canada. Retrieved 18 August 2020.
  39. ^ Lowe, Gerry (18 August 2020). "In response to the announcement of a general election [...]". Facebook. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  40. ^ Urquhart, Carl (18 August 2020). "The day has come to retire". Facebook. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  41. ^ McGuire, Rick (12 August 2020). "STEWART FAIRGRIEVE NOT REOFFERING IN NEXT PROVINCIAL ELECTION". Facebook. Retrieved 28 August 2020.

External links[edit]