2021 Argentine legislative election

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2021 Argentine legislative election
Argentina
← 2019 14 November 2021 2023 →

127 of 257 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
24 of 72 seats in the Senate
Turnout71.39% (Deputies)
70.83% (Senate)
Party % Seats +/–
Chamber of Deputies
Together for Change

42.13% 61
Everyone's Front

34.17% 50
Libertarians/Conservatives

7.23% 4
Left and Worker's Front-Unity

5.53% 4
Let's go with You/Federal Consensus

5.51% 4
Front for the Renewal of Concord

0.98% 1
Together We Are Río Negro

0.60% 1
Neuquén People's Movement

0.47% 1
SER Santa Cruz

0.20% 1
Senate
Together for Change

46.88% 14
Everyone's Front

28.12% 9
Let's go with You/Federal Consensus

11.29% 1
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
2021 Argentine legislative election - Results.svg
Map showing the seats won by each party in each province.

Legislative elections were held in Argentina on 14 November 2021.[1] Half of the seats in the Chamber of Deputies and a third of the seats in the Senate were renewed.[2] The election had previously been scheduled to take place on 24 October 2021,[3] but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina.[1]

Open, Simultaneous and Mandatory Primaries (PASO) were previously scheduled to take place on 8 August 2021, but took place on 12 September 2021, having also been postponed due to COVID-19.[1] There were proposals, backed by the ruling Frente de Todos, to scrap the primaries altogether due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[4] The proposals were opposed by the Juntos por el Cambio opposition.[5] In June 2021, it was agreed to reschedule the primaries alongside the general election instead.[6]

127 out of 257 seats in the lower chamber were renewed, while eight provinces (Catamarca, Chubut, Córdoba, Corrientes, La Pampa, Mendoza, Santa Fe and Tucumán) each renewed their 3 senators, in total accounting for 24 out of 72 seats in the upper chamber.[2]

The main opposition alliance, Together for Change, was seen as the big winner of the election.[7][8] The governing Frente de Todos suffered big losses, losing its majority in the Senate for the first time in almost 40 years, and seeing defeats in stronghold provinces such as Buenos Aires and La Pampa.[9][10] Observers attributed the loss to the widespread anger over high inflation and rising poverty.[11][12]

Background[edit]

Both executive and legislative offices were renewed in 2019 in Argentina; both elections were won by the Frente de Todos, a new coalition formed by a number of Peronist and Kirchnerist parties and alliances (chiefly the Justicialist Party and the Renewal Front)[13] to support the presidential ticket of Alberto Fernández and former President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner (now Vice President). The Frente de Todos coalition won 64 out of 130 seats up for grabs in the lower house in the last election, thus currently accounting for 120 seats in the 2019–2021 period – 9 seats short of a majority.[14][15]

The second minority and largest force in the opposition is the coalition formed to support former president Mauricio Macri: Juntos por el Cambio (formed by, among others, Republican Proposal, the Radical Civic Union and the Civic Coalition ARI), which won 56 seats in the Chamber of Deputies in 2019 and presently counts with 115 seats, following defections from its inter-bloc.[15][16]

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic[edit]

As early December 2020, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina prompted discussions on whether the 2021 elections, as well as the Open, Simultaneous and Mandatory Primaries (PASO) should be delayed and rescheduled. A majority of provincial governors (both from the governing Frente de Todos as well as from opposition parties), initially suggested scrapping the PASO primaries altogether.[4] The Juntos por el Cambio-led opposition in Congress, however, opposed the measure and introduced a bill to forbid the national government from cancelling the primaries.[5] The national executive, led by President Alberto Fernández, initially supported the measure,[17] but later reached an agreement with Juntos por el Cambio to reschedule both the primaries and the legislative election for a month later.[18] The new electoral calendar was published on 4 August 2021: the PASO primaries, originally scheduled for 8 August 2021, were rescheduled for 11 September 2021, while the legislative election, originally scheduled for 24 October 2021, were rescheduled for 14 November 2021.[1][19]

In order to hold both elections, in which the all citizens between the ages of 18 and 70 are legally obligated to vote,[20] the government and the National Electoral Chamber established a safety protocol which included a 30% increase of voting places and the vaccination of all electoral authorities.[21] In addition, those who may exhibit COVID-19 symptoms or were in close contact with a positive case may be exempt from voting.[22]

Electoral system[edit]

Number of Deputies at stake in each district.
Provinces that elected Senators in blue.

Chamber of Deputies[edit]

The 257 members of the Chamber of Deputies are elected by proportional representation in 24 multi-member constituencies based on the provinces (plus the City of Buenos Aires). Seats are allocated using the d'Hondt method with a 3% electoral threshold.[23] In this election, 127 of the 257 seats are up for renewal for a four-year term.[24]

Province Seats Seats
at stake
Buenos Aires 70 35
City of Buenos Aires 25 13
Catamarca 5 3
Chaco 7 4
Chubut 5 2
Córdoba 18 9
Corrientes 7 3
Entre Ríos 9 5
Formosa 5 2
Jujuy 6 3
La Pampa 5 3
La Rioja 5 2
Mendoza 10 5
Misiones 7 3
Neuquén 5 3
Río Negro 5 2
Salta 7 3
San Juan 6 3
San Luis 5 3
Santa Cruz 5 3
Santa Fe 19 9
Santiago del Estero 7 3
Tierra del Fuego 5 2
Tucumán 9 4
Total 257 127

Senate[edit]

The 72 members of the Senate are elected in the same 24 constituencies, with three seats in each. The party receiving the most votes in each constituency wins two seats, with the third seat awarded to the second-placed party.[25] The 2021 elections will see one-third of Senators renewed, with eight provinces electing three Senators; Catamarca, Chubut, Córdoba, Corrientes, La Pampa, Mendoza, Santa Fe and Tucumán.[24]

Current composition[edit]

Results[edit]

Primary elections[edit]

Voting booth in Gonnet, Buenos Aires in the 2021 PASO elections.

Open primary elections for legislative posts were held nationwide on 12 September. With this system, all parties run primary elections on a single ballot. All parties must take part in it, both the parties with internal factions and parties with a single candidate list. Citizens may vote for any candidate of any party, but may only cast a single vote. The candidate receiving the most votes, of each party gaining 1.5% or higher of the valid votes advances to the general election.[26][27]

The results were largely negative for the governing Frente de Todos,[28] which received around 30% of the popular vote nationwide and lost in traditionally Peronist-leaning provinces such as Buenos Aires, Chaco, La Pampa, Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego.[29] With a nationwide aggregate of 42%, Juntos por el Cambio was the most voted alliance in 16 out of 23 provinces and in the City of Buenos Aires, while local parties won in Neuquén (MPN) and Río Negro (JSRN).[30] Nationwide, the Workers' Left Front was the third-most voted alliance, with exceptionally good results in Jujuy (23.31%), the City of Buenos Aires (6.23%) and Buenos Aires Province (5.22%).[31] In fourth place were the libertarian fronts "Avanza Libertad" and "La Libertad Avanza", which competed in Buenos Aires Province and the City of Buenos Aires (respectively) and received 6.85% of the vote overall, with a particularly strong result in the City, where the front became the third-largest force.[32]

With a turnout of 66.21%, the 2021 primaries had the lowest participation since the implementation of the PASO system in 2011, and were the least-concurred nationwide elections since the return of democracy in 1983.[33]

Chamber of Deputies[edit]

At a press conference, the Minister of the Interior, Eduardo de Pedro, said electoral participation was around 71.72% of the electoral roll, a rise of five points compared to the 67% participation in the PASO, a historical minimum in those kinds of choices.[34]

Argentina's main opposition party, Together for Change, was seen as the big winner of the election, gaining 42.13% of the vote and 61 out of the 127 seats.[7][8] The Justicialist Party suffered big losses as its coalition lost its majority in the Senate for the first time since the return of democracy in 1983, as well as being defeated in its historical stronghold province of Buenos Aires.[9][10] Frente de Todos only gathered 34.17% of the vote, winning 50 out of the 127 seats, 11 seats behind Juntos por el Cambio. Observers attributed the loss to the widespread anger over high inflation and rising poverty.[11][12] FIT-U won 5.53 of the vote and 4 seats, an increase of 2 seats. Federal Consensus lost 3 seats, winning only 3 seats and 5.51% of the vote.[35]

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Total Together for Change (JxC) 9,943,358 42.13 61 116
Together for Change (JxC) 9,239,438 39.15 56
Meeting for Corrientes (ECO) 325,710 1.38 2
Together for Free Formosa 134,445 0.57 1
United for San Luis 126,693 0.54 2
Civic Coalition ARI (CC ARI) 53,365 0.23
Let's go La Rioja 49,837 0.21
Radical Civic Union (UCR) 13,870 0.06
Total Everyone's Front (FdT) 8,065,652 34.17 50 118
Everyone's Front (FdT) 7,474,030 31.67 46
Civic Front for Santiago 363,144 1.54 3
San Luis Force 125,163 0.53 1
Renewal Front (FR) 39,658 0.17
Federal Commitment 35,657 0.15
Faith Party 24,362 0.10
Everyone United 3,638 0.02
Total Libertarians/Conservatives 1,705,416 7.23 4 4
Advance Freedom 669,865 2.84 2 2
Freedom Advances 358,377 1.52 2 2
+Values 263,515 1.12
Republican Force (FR) 101,350 0.43
Unite for Liberty and Dignity (Unite) 75,023 0.32
Córdoba Neighborhood Encounter 74,879 0.32
Let's Go! Mendocinos 38,210 0.16
We Can 31,763 0.13
Conservative People's Party (PCP) 29,569 0.13
Freedom, Values and Change Party 22,996 0.10
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCEDE) 17,092 0.07
Federal Popular Union (UPF) 16,374 0.07
Republicans United 6,403 0.03
Total Left and Worker's Front-Unity (FIT-U) 1,305,518 5.53 4 4
Left and Worker's Front-Unity (FIT-U) 1,210,906 5.13 4 4
Workers' Party (PO) 66,666 0.28
Workers' Socialist Movement-New Left (MST) 27,946 0.12
Total Let's go with You/Federal Consensus 1,301,132 5.51 4 8
We Do for Córdoba 491,969 2.08 2 3
Let's go with You 415,905 1.76 1 3
Broad Front 270,267 1.15 1 2
Freemen of the South Movement (MLS) 48,749 0.21
Socialist Party (PS) 39,100 0.17
Ischigualasto Consensus 35,142 0.15
Front for the Renewal of Concord 230,817 0.98 1 2
Together We Are Río Negro (JSRN) 140,634 0.60 1 2
Neuquén People's Movement (MPN) 112,027 0.47 1 1
Green Party 91,187 0.39
Independent Salta + Salta Renewal Party Front 86,238 0.37
Popular Sovereignty 81,795 0.35
United for Salta 71,992 0.31
Self-determination and Freedom (AyL) 56,369 0.24
Integrating Front 49,502 0.21
Patriotic Labor Front 48,085 0.20
We are Energy to Renew Santa Cruz (SER) 46,633 0.20 1 2
Independent Party of Chubut (PICH) 44,053 0.19
We are Future 41,126 0.17
Federal Party (PF) 38,087 0.16
We Are All Chubut (CST) 29,622 0.13
FELICIDAD Party 28,796 0.12
Santa Fe First 27,771 0.12
Movement for Socialism (MAS) 27,311 0.12
We are Fuegians 15,342 0.07
Buenos Aires Thought Stream (COPEBO) 5,991 0.03
United 3,446 0.01
Fueguian People's Movement (MOPOF) 2,563 0.01
Principles and Conviction Party 2,030 0.01
Total 23,602,493 100 127 257
Positive votes 23,602,493 95.01
Blank votes 792,552 3.19
Invalid votes 447,527 1.80
Total votes 24,842,572 100
Registered voters/turnout 34,796,245 71.39
Sources:[36][37]

Results by province[edit]

Province JxC FdT Lib./Cons. FIT-U We Go With You Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Buenos Aires 3,550,321 39.77 15 3,444,446 38.59 15 933,380 10.46 2 609,158 6.82 2 389,295 4.36 1
Buenos Aires City 867,044 47.09 7 461,514 25.06 3 313,808 17.04 2 142,581 7.74 1 56,369 3.06
Catamarca 75,625 37.14 1 103,144 50.65 2 8,728 4.29 10,150 4.98 5,991 2.94
Chaco 258,654 42.74 2 269,441 44.52 2 15,169 2.51 12,464 2.06 49,502 8.18
Chubut 110,649 37.97 1 82,134 28.19 1 24,941 8.56 73,675 25.28
Córdoba 1,064,246 54.06 6 206,795 10.50 1 135,822 6.90 69,755 3.54 491,969 24.99 2
Corrientes 325,710 58.73 2 214,694 38.71 1 14,146 2.55
Entre Ríos 436,013 54.61 3 276,883 34.68 2 29,569 3.70 27,946 3.50 16,710 2.09 11,282 1.41
Formosa 134,445 41.56 1 186,991 57.81 1 2,030 0.63
Jujuy 198,300 49.12 1 104,496 25.89 1 100,892 24.99 1
La Pampa 101,717 48.01 2 89,813 42.39 1 9,147 4.32 6,199 2.93 4,984 2.35
La Rioja 49,837 27.97 100,055 56.16 2 17,092 9.59 7,721 4.33 3,446 1.93
Mendoza 490,182 49.58 3 282,695 28.59 2 38,210 3.86 48,395 4.89 129,274 13.07
Misiones 257,323 40.86 2 96,310 15.29 22,996 3.65 22,336 3.55 230,817 36.65 1
Neuquén 140,303 36.88 1 66,070 17.37 1 31,153 8.19 30,884 8.12 112,027 29.45 1
Río Negro 102,579 27.21 1 101,844 27.01 18,192 4.83 7,749 2.06 146,657 38.90 1
Salta 188,162 29.99 1 205,853 32.81 2 46,397 7.39 187,026 29.81
San Juan 173,069 42.14 1 179,000 43.58 2 23,487 5.72 35,142 8.56
San Luis 140,563 51.16 2 128,801 46.88 1 5,365 1.95
Santa Cruz 57,921 35.09 1 45,436 27.52 1 11,660 7.06 50,058 30.32 1
Santa Fe 733,360 40.32 5 570,498 31.36 3 102,613 5.64 39,063 2.15 222,740 12.25 1 150,692 8.28
Santiago del Estero 72,932 13.03 402,802 71.96 3 4,173 0.75 5,444 0.97 26,307 4.70 48,085 8.59
Tierra del Fuego 27,584 29.02 1 37,692 39.65 1 6,403 6.74 3,883 4.08 19,502 20.51
Tucumán 386,819 39.96 2 408,245 42.18 2 101,350 10.47 34,105 3.52 37,377 3.86
Total 9,943,358 42.13 61 8,065,652 34.17 50 1,705,416 7.23 4 1,305,518 5.53 4 1,301,132 5.51 4 1,281,417 5.43 4

Senate[edit]

In the senate, Together for Change won 14 out of 24 seats available, making an increase of 5. Frente de Todos lost 4 seats, gathering only 9 seats. The last available seat went to Federal Consensus with FIT-U gaining none.[35]

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Total Together for Change (JxC) 3,290,442 46.88 14 33
Together for Change (JxC) 2,962,225 42,20 12
Meeting for Corrientes (ECO) 328,217 4.68 2
Total Everyone's Front (FdT) 1,973,917 28.12 9 35
Everyone's Front (FdT) 1,937,947 27.61 9 35
Federal Commitment 35,970 0.51
Total Let's go with You/Federal Consensus 792,261 11.29 1 1
We Do for Córdoba 491,029 7.00 1 1
Broad Front 281,092 4.00
We Go With You 13,934 0.20
Socialist Party (PS) 6,206 0.09
Total Libertarians/Conservatives 380,022 5.41
Republican Force (FR) 107,829 1.54
Córdoba Neighborhood Encounter 74,024 1.05
Unite for Liberty and Dignity (Unite) 66,910 0.95
Freedom Advances 44,819 0.64
Let's Go! Mendocinos 37,992 0.54
We Can 31,588 0.45
Federal Popular Union (UPF) 16,860 0.24
Left and Worker's Front-Unity (FIT-U) 233,598 3.33
Green Party 90,949 1.30
Popular Sovereignty 64,010 0.91
Independent Party of Chubut (PICH) 44,736 0.64
We are Future 39,526 0.56
Federal Party (PF) 38,417 0.55
Santa Fe First 30,117 0.43
We Are All Chubut (CST) 29,937 0.43
Buenos Aires Thought Stream (COPEBO) 6,066 0.09
Movement for Socialism (MAS) 4,939 0.07
Federal Peronism Did not run 1
Together We Are Río Negro (JSRN) Did not run 1
Front for the Renewal of Concord Did not run 1
Total 7,018,937 100 24 72
Positive votes 7,018,937 94.33
Blank votes 257,523 3.46
Invalid votes 164,099 2.21
Total votes 7,440,559 100
Registered voters/turnout 10,505,451 70.83
Sources:[36][37]

Results by province[edit]

Province JxC FdT VcV Lib./Cons. Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Catamarca 76,354 37.12 1 104,412 50.76 2 10,167 4.94 14,753 7.17
Chubut 110,997 37.87 2 82,674 28.21 1 99,443 33.93
Córdoba 1,063,595 54.09 2 206,300 10.49 491,029 24.97 1 135,703 6.90 69,644 3.54
Corrientes 328,217 58.82 2 215,822 38.68 1 13,934 2.50
La Pampa 102,218 48.25 2 89,409 42.21 1 6,206 2.93 14,005 6.61
Mendoza 490,754 49.57 2 284,119 28.70 1 37,992 3.84 177,230 17.90
Santa Fe 738,568 40.41 2 589,837 32.27 1 228,459 12.50 98,498 5.39 172,507 9.44
Tucumán 379,739 39.31 1 401,344 41.54 2 42,466 4.40 107,829 11.16 34,713 3.59
Total 3,290,442 46.88 14 1,973,917 28.12 9 792,261 11.29 1 380,022 5.41 0 582,295 8.30 0

Aftermath[edit]

Argentina's President Alberto Fernández called for dialogue with the opposition after Sunday's midterm parliamentary elections, with the results showing his governing coalition has lost control of Congress. "An opposition that is responsible and open to dialogue is a patriotic opposition," Fernández said, adding that he hoped for cooperation that would be "fruitful, for the general interests of the country."[38]

Argentina's main opposition party, Together for Change, celebrated the victory in the legislative elections.[39] Former president Mauricio Macri reacted, “The result confirms that it is the end of one era and the beginning of another".[40] Macri continued saying, "These next two years are going to be difficult," while assuring voters that his coalition would "act with great responsibility."[41]

The Argentinian peso went up in value following the opposition's win. Alberto Ramos, an analyst at Goldman Sachs, explained the rise: "The market is likely to take a net positive view of the election results. A more market-friendly composition of Congress could lead to more effective checks and balances and ultimately a policy regime shift in 2023".[42]

References[edit]

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