2023 Lewiston shootings

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2023 Lewiston shootings
An image of Robert Card inside Just-In-Time Recreation released by the Androscoggin County Sheriff's Office
LocationLewiston, Maine, U.S.
DateOctober 25, 2023; 3 months ago (2023-10-25)
6:56[1] – 7:08 p.m.[2] (EDT)
Attack type
Mass shooting, mass murder, spree shooting, murder–suicide
Weapons
Deaths19 (including the perpetrator)
Injured13
PerpetratorRobert Russell Card II

On October 25, 2023, Robert Card, aged 40, carried out a spree shooting in Lewiston, Maine, United States, resulting in the death of 18 individuals and injuries to 13 others.[4][5][6] The initial attack occurred at the Just-in-Time Recreation bowling alley during a youth league event, followed shortly by a second shooting at the Schemengees Bar & Grille Restaurant.[7] Subsequent to these events, Card escaped, prompting the Androscoggin County Sheriff's Office to initiate an extensive manhunt and release his photograph identifying him as the suspect.

Two days later, on October 27, authorities discovered Card dead in a tractor-trailer near a recycling center in Lisbon, where he had been recently employed,[8] due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The shooting is the tenth-deadliest in U.S. history[9] and the deadliest in the history of Maine.[10]

Events[edit]

Shootings[edit]

The first shooting occurred on October 25, 2023, at Just-In-Time Recreation, a Lewiston, Maine, bowling alley, during a youth league event.[11] The shooter, 40-year-old Robert Card, used a Ruger SFAR semi-automatic rifle chambered in .308 Winchester[12] and equipped with an extended magazine, flashlight and optic.[13] Police received the first emergency calls at 6:56 p.m. EDT.[14] Plainclothes officers at a nearby shooting range also heard the gunshots and responded. The earliest officers to arrive at the scene did so within four minutes of the first call.[15] Seven people were killed at Just-In-Time.[14]

Shortly after, at 7:08, a second shooting was reported at Schemengees Bar & Grille Restaurant, 4 miles (6.4 km) south of the bowling alley.[14][16] Officers arrived at the scene two minutes later.[15] Eight people were killed at this location, seven of them inside the building and the eighth outside. Additionally, three injured victims would succumb to their injuries while in the hospital.[14][15]

At 8:06, the Androscoggin County Sheriff's Office and the Maine State Police alerted residents of an active shooter. The sheriff's office also released images of Card inside the bowling alley with a "high-powered assault-style rifle", as well as an image of his 2013 Subaru Outback, warning residents that the shooter was "armed and dangerous".[15][17][18][19][20]

The Central Maine Medical Center coordinated with local area hospitals to take in victims.[21][22] Several were taken to the Maine Medical Center in Portland, the largest hospital in the state.[23][24]

Manhunt[edit]

Three hours after the shooting, police in Lisbon, a small town 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Lewiston, found Card's abandoned vehicle at a boat launch along the Androscoggin River.[15][25] The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives[26] assisted local authorities.[27]

On October 26, the Maine State Police and Governor Janet Mills confirmed the number of victims[28] and announced that an arrest warrant was issued for the suspect, who was charged with eight counts of murder.[29] Police surrounded a house in Bowdoin while executing a search warrant.[30]

On October 27, Michael Sauschuck, public safety commissioner of Maine, said that police were using dive teams, sonar, and remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) to search for underwater activity near where Card's vehicle was found in Lisbon. Sauschuck said they did not definitively know Card's means of escape.[31] That same day, the shelter-in-place order in Lewiston was rescinded, but hunting restrictions in Bowdoin, Lewiston, Lisbon, and Monmouth were imposed.[32]

At 7:45 p.m. of October 27, Card was found dead near his former place of employment, a recycling center close to the Androscoggin River in Lisbon.[33][34] The recycling center had been searched the night before, but his body was found in a box truck on a part of the land that had not been searched previously.[15][35] The manner of death was suicide and the cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head; the Maine Chief Medical Examiner's autopsy revealed he had likely died 8 to 12 hours before being found.[8][36]

The hunting restrictions that had been put in place were subsequently removed.[33]

Victims[edit]

A total of eighteen people were killed; thirteen others were injured.[37] Seven were killed at Just-In-Time Recreation, eight were killed at Schemengees Bar & Grille Restaurant, and three died in a hospital.[14][15] Four of those killed at Schemengees were deaf and had been participating in a cornhole tournament for the deaf community.[38][39] Ranging in age from 14 to 76, the dead were all identified on October 27.[40]

Perpetrator[edit]

Robert Russell Card II[41] (April 4, 1983[42] – October 27, 2023[43]) was a longtime resident of Bowdoin, Maine.[44][45][42] He was identified by the police on October 25 as a person of interest[46][47][48] and designated as a suspect the next day.[49] Card was a sergeant first class in the United States Army Reserve and enlisted in December 2002.[50][51] He was a petroleum supply specialist[52] and had no overseas or combat deployments.[52][53]

Card attended Bowdoin Central School and later Mount Ararat High School in nearby Topsham.[54][55] After graduating in 2001, he studied engineering at the University of Maine from 2001 to 2004 but did not complete his education.[56] Before 2023, his only recorded interactions with law enforcement were a 2007 arrest for DUI, to which he pleaded guilty, and two speeding charges in 2001 and 2002.[57][58]

In May 2023, Card's son and ex-wife reported his declining mental health to a Sagadahoc County sheriff's deputy, associating his reports of auditory hallucinations to being fitted for hearing aids in February 2023.[59] In July 2023, leaders of Card's unit (3rd Battalion, 304th Infantry Regiment) made a report to law enforcement about Card's alarming comments and erratic behavior while training at Camp Smith (close to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York).[60][61] The Army Reserve specifically told law enforcement that he threatened to "shoot up" a military base in Saco, Maine. He was removed from training exercises, and the New York State Police responded and transported Card to West Point's Keller Army Community Hospital for psychological evaluation. He received two weeks of additional treatment at the Four Winds Psychiatric Hospital in Katonah, New York.[14][61]

Card returned home on August 3, 2023, and the Army barred him from handling guns or ammunition, deeming him a "non-deployable" serviceman.[62] That same day, a gun shop in Auburn, Maine, denied his access to purchase a silencer because he responded "yes" to the question "Have you ever been adjudicated as a mental defective OR ever been committed to a mental institution?" on the ATF Form 4473.[63][64]

In mid-September 2023, the Army Reserve requested that the Sagadahoc County Sheriff's Department conduct a well-being check on Card, after he punched a fellow reservist who asked Card to stop talking about "shooting up places and people". Card did not answer the door but could be heard moving inside his trailer home by the sheriff deputy outside. Because Card was described by his commanders as a top marksman, the deputy requested backup from the Kennebec County Sheriff's Department, about 45 minutes away, and wrote in a report that "due to being in a very disadvantageous position we decided to back away".[64]

According to a police affidavit, Card's family members indicated Card believed he was being broadcast as a pedophile online by businesses and people including Just-In-Time, Schmengee's, and a manager at Schmengee's, who was one of the eight victims there that night.[65]

Aftermath[edit]

Following the shootings, a shelter-in-place order was implemented in Lewiston, and schools were placed on lockdown, along with schools across the southern Maine area.[66] Auburn issued its own shelter-in-place order and told businesses to lock down as well.[67] Classes at schools in the Lewiston Public Schools district, Central Maine Community College, and Bates College were canceled on October 26, as well as several additional school districts within a 50-mile radius.[68][69][70] The shelter-in-place advisory was extended to Bowdoin on October 26.[71] Bates College also postponed its presidential inauguration, previously scheduled for October 27, until further notice.[72] Additionally, extra security measures were taken along the Canada–U.S. border following an "armed and dangerous" alert issued by the Canada Border Services Agency.[73][74][75]

Shortly after the shooting, there was an increase in the number of individuals within the state looking to purchase a weapon. A gun store owner told reporters that he had done more business the day after the shooting than he had in the prior month. Although deer season was scheduled to start the Saturday after the shooting, he believed most of the sales were safety related. Prospective buyers allegedly waited in line for over an hour at one gun store.[76]

Social media[edit]

In the days after the shootings, multiple outlets reported on Card's use of social media prior to the shootings. Card had used Twitter to like and retweet far-right extremist views, including transphobic views by right-wing figures like Tucker Carlson and Donald Trump Jr..[77][78][79]

Disinformation[edit]

According to Wired, right after the shooting, social media platforms such as TikTok, Facebook, and Twitter were flooded with disinformation about Card. This included false claims that he had been arrested and was no longer at large. Some stated inaccurately, based on information about someone else with the same name, that Card was arrested in 2016 for possessing and disseminating sexually explicit materials.[80][81]

Reactions[edit]

Local and state[edit]

Lewiston mayor Carl Sheline said that he was "heartbroken".[82] Jason Levesque, mayor of Auburn, Lewiston's twin city, added "we will get this situation settled."[83] Maine Governor Janet Mills urged residents to follow law enforcement instructions.[84] Nirav Shah, former head of the Maine Center for Disease Control and currently the deputy director of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, offered his condolences for Joshua Seal, a victim who had been employed under Shah as an American Sign Language interpreter for the deaf during the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar condolences were offered by Karen Hopkins, director of the Maine Education Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, as three of the victims killed were graduates of the center.[38]

Federal[edit]

U.S. Senator Angus King of Maine wrote on Twitter that he was "deeply sad".[85] Fellow Senator Susan Collins remarked, "This is the darkest day in Maine history in my lifetime."[86] Jared Golden—who represents Lewiston—and Chellie Pingree, both U.S. Representatives from Maine, released statements expressing shock at the events.[87] Following the shooting, Golden further announced his support for an assault weapons ban, reversing his previous opposition to gun control measures and asked for "forgiveness" from the community and victims' families for his previous position.[88] On October 25, President Joe Biden made calls to several Maine lawmakers to offer full federal support.[89] On October 26, he ordered that U.S. flags be lowered to half-staff for five days as "a mark of respect for the victims of the senseless acts of violence perpetrated in Lewiston, Maine".[90][91] In a later statement, Biden urged lawmakers to impose an assault weapons ban and introduce more gun regulations, saying it is "not normal, and we cannot accept it" and that current safety measures are "simply not enough".[92]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sharp, David; Bumsted, Robert; Ramer, Holly; Balsamo, Michael (October 26, 2023). "A suspect in the fatal shooting of 18 in Maine is still at large. Residents are sheltering in place". AP News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  2. ^ Hoffman, Marla (October 25, 2023). "Multiple victims reported following shootings in Lewiston". Sun Journal. Lewiston, Maine. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  3. ^ "Maine Mass Shooter Purchased .308-Caliber 'Battle Rifle' Days Before Mental Health Hospitalization: Report". The Messenger. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023. CNN's John Miller, citing law enforcement sources, reports that Card purchased the Ruger SFAR during July in Maine, about 10 days before he had an encounter with New York State Police and his National Guard superiors that led to his hospitalization for mental health reasons.
  4. ^ Lenthang, Marlene; Romero, Dennis (October 28, 2023). "Maine shootings: Timeline of the fatal Lewiston attacks". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  5. ^ Borter, Gabriella (October 28, 2023). "Maine shooting suspect found dead in cargo trailer, motive still a mystery". Reuters. Archived from the original on October 29, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  6. ^ "At least 18 killed in mass shooting in US state of Maine". Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  7. ^ "Maine city deserted as residents hole up during hunt for killer". France 24. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  8. ^ a b "Maine gunman Robert Card died 8-12 hours before being found, medical examiner says". WBZ-TV. November 3, 2023.
  9. ^ Konig, Joseph (October 26, 2023). "Lewiston mass shootings the worst of 2023, U.S. on track for 700". NY1. Archived from the original on October 29, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  10. ^ Helsel, Phil; Romero, Dennis (October 27, 2023). "Suspect in Maine mass shooting is dead, senior law enforcement sources say". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  11. ^ "Witnesses describe moment gunfire erupts during youth bowling league in Maine". KCRA. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  12. ^ "18 dead, 13 wounded in Lewiston, Maine shootings as police search for suspect Robert Card – CBS Boston". CBS News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  13. ^ "Who is Robert Card? Confirmed details on Maine shooting suspect". CBS News. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  14. ^ a b c d e f "Lewiston attack: What we know so far about Maine mass shooting". BBC News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Andone, Dakin (October 26, 2023). "Here's a timeline of the mass shooting in Maine and the ongoing manhunt for a suspect". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  16. ^ "Shooting at Bowling Alley in Maine: Latest Updates". Time. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  17. ^ Helsel, Phil (October 25, 2023). "Law enforcement in Maine warns of active shooter, tells people to shelter". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  18. ^ Prasad, Ritu (October 26, 2023). "22 people dead and suspect at large after shootings in area of Lewiston, Maine, authorities say". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  19. ^ Lynch, Jamiel (October 25, 2023). "Police release photo of vehicle connected to shootings". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  20. ^ Smart, Sara (October 25, 2023). "Police release images of suspect at large in connection to active shooting in Lewiston". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  21. ^ Lynch, Jamiel; Clarkson, Cara-Lynn (October 25, 2023). "Medical center confirms response to mass casualty event". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  22. ^ Trotta, Daniel; Harte, Julia (October 26, 2023). "At least 22 killed, dozens wounded in Lewiston, Maine shootings – NBC". Reuters. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  23. ^ Higgins, Eoin (October 25, 2023). "Some of the injured are being taken to Maine Medical Center in Portland, a Level 1 trauma center and the state's largest hospital". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  24. ^ Yang, Maya; Oladipo, Gloria; Belam, Martin; Yerushalmy, Jonathan (October 26, 2023). "Maine shootings: at least 16 reported dead in Lewiston as police hunt gunman – latest updates". The Guardian. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  25. ^ Rose, Andy (October 27, 2023). "Official: Divers to search waters near dock where suspect's car was found". CNN. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  26. ^ Boyette, Chris (October 25, 2023). "ATF is responding to the Lewiston shootings". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  27. ^ Campbell, Josh (October 25, 2023). "FBI offers resources in Maine active shooter situation". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  28. ^ Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas (October 26, 2023). "Maine Shootings: Update from". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  29. ^ "Maine shooting suspect faces multiple counts of murder, police say". CNN. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  30. ^ "Lewiston Maine shooting: 'Armed and dangerous' suspect still at large as 18 killed in shooting". BBC News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  31. ^ Rose, Andy (October 27, 2023). "Official: Divers to search waters near dock where suspect's car was found". CNN. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  32. ^ Ketschke, Ross (October 27, 2023). "As search for Maine shooting suspect continues, shelter-in-place order lifted". WMUR-TV. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  33. ^ a b Sharp, David; Whittle, Patrick; Ramer, Holly; Smith, Michelle R. (October 27, 2023). "Maine mass killing suspect has been found dead, ending search that put entire state on edge". AP News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  34. ^ Lelyveld, Nita (October 26, 2023). "Live updates: Mourners gather at candlelight vigil to remember victims". Press Herald. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 30, 2023.
  35. ^ Bleiberg, Jake; Whittle, Patrick; Sharp, David (October 28, 2023). "Maine mass killing suspect had mental health issues, purchased guns legally, authorities say". Associated Press. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  36. ^ John R. Ellement, Maine shooter Robert Card died of gunshot wound to head, Boston Globe (November 3, 2023).
  37. ^ "Live now: Maine State Police update on search for shooter, 18 confirmed dead". Press Herald. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  38. ^ a b Mistler, Steve (October 27, 2023). "Lewiston's mass shooting deals devastating blow to deaf and hard of hearing community". Maine Public. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  39. ^ "What we know about the victims of the Maine mass shooting". CNN. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  40. ^ "These are the people who died in the mass shootings in Lewiston, Maine". NBC Boston. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  41. ^ Ismay, John (October 26, 2023). "Maine Shootings: Update from John Ismay". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 30, 2023.
  42. ^ a b Tenser, Phil (October 26, 2023). "Robert Card sought in connection with Lewiston, Maine mass shootings". WCVB-TV/ABC News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  43. ^ Edmonds, Colbi; Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas (November 4, 2023). "Maine Gunman Was Most Likely Alive for Much of 2-Day Manhunt". The New York Times. Retrieved November 4, 2023.
  44. ^ "Maine shooting suspect Robert Card found dead, officials say – CBS News". www.cbsnews.com. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  45. ^ "What We Know About Robert Card, A Longtime Resident Of Bowdoin". The New York Times. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  46. ^ "Police are said to believe they know identity of shooting suspect". NBC News. October 25, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  47. ^ Simeone, Jessica (October 25, 2023). "Law enforcement trying to 'eliminate the active killer or killers', former ATF agent says". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  48. ^ "Lewiston police identify Robert Card as person of interest in fatal shootings". NBC News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  49. ^ "Massive manhunt underway for shooter; at least 16 dead, official says". The Washington Post.
  50. ^ Ismay, John; Bogel-Borroughs, Nicholas; Thrush, Glenn; Mazzei, Patricia (October 26, 2023). "What We Know About the Maine Shooting Suspect". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  51. ^ Barrett, Devlin; Stein, Perry; Berman, Mark; Horton, Alex (October 26, 2023). "What we know about Robert Card, suspect sought in the Maine mass killings". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  52. ^ a b Maine shooting suspect is U.S. Army Reserve petroleum supply specialist, Army says, Reuters (October 26, 2023).
  53. ^ Arkin, Daniel; Chan, Melissa (October 26, 2023). "Lewiston police identify Robert Card as a suspect in fatal shootings". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  54. ^ "Lewiston shooting suspect's life, who a skilled marksman later struggled with mental health". centralmaine.com. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  55. ^ "Lewiston shooting suspect's background". centralmaine.com. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  56. ^ "What we know about the suspect sought in the Maine mass killings". Washington Post. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  57. ^ "Who is Robert Card? Authorities searching for person of interest in connection with Lewiston mass shootings". WGME. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  58. ^ "What we know about the suspect sought in the Maine mass killings". NBC News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  59. ^ Arkin, Daniel; Chan, Melissa (October 26, 2023). "Lewiston police identify Robert Card as a suspect in fatal shootings". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  60. ^ Alex Sundby, Eleanor Watson, Army decided Maine shooting gunman Robert Card shouldn't have a weapon after erratic behavior in July, CBS News (October 31, 2023).
  61. ^ a b Joshua Solomon & Phillip Pantuso, State Police didn't pursue 'red flag' order for Maine shooting suspect, Times-Union (October 28, 2023).
  62. ^ Royzman, Valerie; Loftus, Sawyer (October 31, 2023). "Army barred Robert Card from handling guns 2 months before Lewiston mass shooting". Bangor Daily News. Archived from the original on November 1, 2023. Retrieved November 1, 2023.
  63. ^ Nouran Salahieh, Shimon Prokupecz and Haley Britzky, The Army said the Maine gunman ‘should not have a weapon’ months before the shooting rampage that left 18 dead, CNN (November 1, 2023).
  64. ^ a b Ellement, John R.; McGrane, Victoria (October 31, 2023). "Newly Released Documents Detail Timeline Ahead of Lewiston, Maine, Shootings". The Boston Globe. Retrieved November 1, 2023.
  65. ^ Ohm, Rachel (October 31, 2023). ""Lewiston gunman met ex at Schemengees, believed businesses were calling him a pedophile, affidavit says"". Portland Press Herald.
  66. ^ Smart, Sara; Sutton, Joe (October 25, 2023). "Maine State Police ask residents to shelter in place as active shooter situation continues". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  67. ^ Lynch, Jamiel (October 25, 2023). "City of Auburn issues shelter in place due to active shooter incident". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  68. ^ Albeck-Ripka, Livia (October 25, 2023). "Jake Langlais, the superintendent of Lewiston Public Schools, said on X that classes would be cancelled on Thursday". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  69. ^ Jeong, Andrew (October 25, 2023). "Central Main Community College, located less than two miles from one of the reported scenes of the shootings, will be closed Thursday due to the incident reported in Lewiston, the school said on social media". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  70. ^ Bryson Taylor, Derrick (October 26, 2023). "Many schools and public buildings are closed while the manhunt continues". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  71. ^ "Live updates: Lewiston, Maine, mass shooting; Manhunt for suspect Robert Card underway". CNN. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  72. ^ Benner, Katie (October 26, 2023). "Bates College postpones the inauguration of its new president after the shooting". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  73. ^ Lau, Rebecca (October 26, 2023). "Maine shooting: Canada's border agency issues suspect 'lookout' watch | Globalnews.ca". Global News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  74. ^ "Manhunt enters 2nd night after Maine mass shootings". CBC. October 27, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  75. ^ MacDonald, Michael (October 26, 2023). "Canada Border Services Agency issues alert about man wanted for Maine mass shooting". CP24. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 29, 2023.
  76. ^ Bonifant, Drew (October 27, 2023). "Gun stores in Maine see brisk business in wake of Lewiston shootings". Press Herald. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  77. ^ Wiggins, Christopher (October 27, 2023). "Maine Massacre Suspect's Anti-Transgender, Extremist Views Emerge Amid Pleas For Gun Control". The Advocate. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  78. ^ Owen, Greg (October 27, 2023). "Suspected Maine mass shooter made anti-trans posts on social media". LGBTQ Nation. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  79. ^ "Maine Mass Shooter Liked Anti-Trans Posts Online". www.advocate.com. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  80. ^ Gilbert, David. "Maine Mass Shooting Disinformation Floods Social Media as Suspect Remains at Large". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  81. ^ Roscoe, Jules (October 26, 2023). "'Verified' X Accounts Are Spreading Misinformation About Maine Shooter Still at Large". Vice. Archived from the original on October 28, 2023. Retrieved October 28, 2023.
  82. ^ Sutton, Joe (October 25, 2023). "Lewiston mayor says he is "heartbroken for our city and our people"". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  83. ^ "'We have everybody on board right now,' mayor of adjacent Auburn says". NBC News. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  84. ^ Sutton, Joe (October 25, 2023). "Maine governor has been briefed on active shooter situation in Lewiston". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  85. ^ Arkin, Daniel (October 25, 2023). "Maine senator says he's 'deeply sad,' urges residents to stay indoors". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  86. ^ Hulse, Carl (October 26, 2023). "Maine Shootings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  87. ^ "Maine lawmakers react to Lewiston mass shootings". CNN. October 25, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  88. ^ Robertson, Nick (October 26, 2023). "Maine Democrat calls for assault weapons ban after past opposition". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  89. ^ Rogers, Katie (October 25, 2023). "Biden called several Maine lawmakers during the state dinner tonight, including Governor Janet Mills, Senators Angus King and Susan Collins, and Congressman Jared Golden". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  90. ^ Carvajal, Nikki; Alvarez, Priscilla (October 26, 2023). "Biden orders flags to be lowered after mass shooting". CNN. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.
  91. ^ "A Proclamation on Honoring the Victims of the Tragedy in Lewiston, Maine". The White House. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  92. ^ "Biden says he's spoken with top Maine officials and is in "mourning" after the "tragic mass shooting"". CNN. October 26, 2023. Archived from the original on October 26, 2023. Retrieved October 26, 2023.

External links[edit]