37th Ohio Infantry

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37th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry
Flag of Ohio.svg
Ohio state flag
ActiveOctober 2, 1861, to August 7, 1865
CountryUnited States
AllegianceUnion
BranchInfantry
EngagementsBattle of Princeton Court House
Vicksburg Campaign
Siege of Vicksburg
Siege of Jackson
Memphis & Charleston Railroad
Chattanooga Campaign
Battle of Missionary Ridge
Battle of Resaca
Battle of New Hope Church
Battle of Dallas
Battle of Marietta
Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
Atlanta Campaign
Battle of Atlanta
Battle of Ezra Church
Battle of Jonesborough
Sherman's March to the Sea
Siege of Savannah
Second Battle of Fort McAllister
Campaign of the Carolinas
Battle of Bentonville

The 37th Ohio Infantry was a Union Army regiment, composed of German-Americans, in the American Civil War. It was organized in the fall of 1861, under Colonel Edward Siber, and served in the Kanawha Valley until December 1862. It joined the Union army operating against Vicksburg, Mississippi, in January 1863, and participated in the various engagements of the siege. After the fall of that stronghold it was moved across Tennessee from Memphis to Chattanooga, and took part in operations of the 15th Corps, subsequent to, and at the taking of Atlanta, Georgia. It then followed the fortunes of that well-known corps until the reaching of Washington, D.C. From Louisville, Kentucky, it went with the 2nd Division of the Corps to Little Rock, Arkansas, and was there mustered out in August 1865.

Medal of Honor recipients[edit]

Nine men earned the Medal of Honor while serving with the 37th Ohio. Six were awarded the medal for their actions on May 22, 1863, during the Siege of Vicksburg; Private Joseph Hanks for rescuing a wounded comrade and five others (Corporal Franz Frey, Private William John, Corporal Louis Renninger, Private Frederick Rock, and Corporal Christian Schnell) for participating in a "forlorn hope" attack on Confederate defenses. At the Battle of Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863, Musician John S. Kountz picked up a rifle and joined the attack, was seriously wounded, and was subsequently rescued from under heavy fire by Private William Schmidt; both men received the Medal of Honor. The regiment's last medal was earned on July 28, 1864, during the Battle of Ezra Church, when Sergeant Ernst Torgler saved the badly wounded commanding officer, Major Charles Hipp, from capture.[1][2]

Service[edit]

Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, and mustered in October 2, 1861, to serve three years. Ordered to the Kanawha Valley, West Virginia. Attached to Benham's Brigade, District of the Kanawha, West Virginia, to October, 1861. District of the Kanawha, West Virginia, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, Department of the Mountains, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to August, 1862. District of the Kanawha, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio, to December, 1862. Ewing's Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Department of Arkansas to August, 1865.[3]

On expiration of its term of service the original members (except veterans) were mustered out, and the organization, composed of veterans and recruits, retained in the service until August 7. 1865, when it was mustered out in accordance with orders from the War Department.[4]

Detailed Service[edit]

Operations in the Kanawha District and New River Regiment, West Virginia, October 19-November 16, 1861. Duty at Clifton until March, 1862. Expedition to Logan Court House and Guyandotte Valley January 12–23. Demonstrations against Virginia & Tennessee Railroad May 10–18. Actions at Princeton May 15, 16 and 17. Charleston May 17. Moved to Flat Top Mountain and duty there until August. Moved to Raleigh Court House August 1. Operations about Wyoming Court House August 2–8. Wyoming Court House August 5. Operations in the Kanawha Valley August 29-September 18. Repulse of Loring's attack on Fayetteville September 10. Cotton Hill September 11. Charleston September 12–13. Duty at Point Pleasant until October 15, and at Gauley Bridge until December 20. Ordered to Napoleon, Ark., December 20; thence to Young's Point, La., January 21, 1863, and duty there until March. Expedition to Rolling Fork via Muddy, Steele's and Black Bayous and Deer Creek March 14–27. Demonstrations on Haines and Drumgould's Bluffs April 27-May 1. Movement to join army in rear of Vicksburg, Miss., via Richmond and Grand Gulf May 2–14. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5–10. Siege of Jackson July 10–17. Camp at Big Black until September 26. Moved to Memphis, thence march to Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26-November 21. Operations on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20–29. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23–27. Tunnel Hill November 24–25. Mission Ridge November 25. March to relief of Knoxville November 29-December 8. Reenlisted at Larkinsville, Ala., February 9, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8–13. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14–15. Advance on Dallas May 18–25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2–5. Ruff's Mills July 3–4. Chattahoochie River July 6–17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Ezra Chapel, Hood's 2nd Sortie, July 28. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25–30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2–6. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Turkeytown and Gadsden Road October 25. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10–21. Fort McAllister December 13. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamp, S.C., February 2–5. Cannon's Bridge, South Edisto River, February 8. North Edisto River February 12–13. Columbia February 16–17. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20–21. Mill Creek March 22. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10–14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June; thence to Little Rock, Ark., and duty there until August. Mustered out August 7, 1865.[5]

Casualties[edit]

The regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 102 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 1 Officer and 94 Enlisted men by disease for a total of 206 fatalities.[6]

Commander[edit]

  • Colonel Edward Siber. (Entered service: September 12, 1861; Resigned: March 23, 1864.) [7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwaral.html Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients - (A-L). United States Army Center of Military History: August 6, 2009. Retrieved April 21, 2010.
  2. ^ http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwaral.html Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients - (M-Z). United States Army Center of Military History: August 6, 2009. Retrieved April 21, 2010.
  3. ^ http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unohinf3.htm#37th The Civil War Archive website after Dyer, Frederick Henry. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. 3 vols. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959. Retrieved June 19, 2007.
  4. ^ https://archive.org/details/ohiowarroster04howerich California Digital Library. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866 Vol. IV.. 4 vols. Akron, Ohio: Joseph B. Foraker, 1887. Retrieved December 23, 2012.
  5. ^ http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unohinf3.htm#37th The Civil War Archive website after Dyer, Frederick Henry. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. 3 vols. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959. Retrieved June 19, 2007.
  6. ^ http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unohinf3.htm#37th The Civil War Archive website after Dyer, Frederick Henry. A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. 3 vols. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959. Retrieved June 19, 2007.
  7. ^ https://archive.org/details/ohiowarroster04howerich California Digital Library. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866 Vol. IV.. 4 vols. Akron, Ohio: Joseph B. Foraker, 1887. Retrieved December 23, 2012.

References[edit]

  • History of the 37th Regiment O.V.V.I. Toledo, Ohio: Montgomery & Vrooman. 1890. Retrieved December 23, 2012.
  • Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866 Vol. IV. Akron, Ohio: The Verner Ptg. and Mfg. Co. 1887. Retrieved December 23, 2012.
  • "Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients - (A-L)". Medal of Honor Citations. United States Army Center of Military History. August 6, 2009. Archived from the original on 3 May 2010. Retrieved April 21, 2010.
  • "Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients - (M-Z)". Medal of Honor Citations. United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. Archived from the original on 4 April 2010. Retrieved April 21, 2010.