Mangalorean cuisine

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Mangalorean Cuisine is a collective name given to the cuisine of Mangalore which comprises cuisines like Udupi as well as cuisine of the Mangalorean communities like that of the Tuluvas, Rajapur Saraswat Brahmins, Goud Saraswat Brahmins, Mangalorean Catholics and the Bearys.

Mangalorean cuisine is largely influenced by the South Indian cuisine, with several cuisines being unique to the diverse communities of the region. Coconut and curry leaves are common ingredients to most Mangalorean curry, as are ginger, garlic and chili. Mangalorean Fish Curry is popular dish in Karnataka. Well-known Tuluva dishes include Neer Dosa, Masala Dosa,"Chicken Ghee Roast","Chicken Sukka",Kori Rotti (dry rice flakes dipped in gravy), Bangude Pulimunchi (spicy sour silver-grey mackerels), Beeja-Manoli Upkari, Neer dosa (lacy rice-crêpes), Boothai Gasi, Kadubu, and Patrode. The Konkani community's specialities include Daali thoy, bibbe-upkari (cashew based), val val, avnas ambe sasam, Kadgi chakko, paagila podi, and chane gashi. Tulu vegetarian cuisine in Mangalore, also known as Udupi cuisine, is known and liked throughout the state and region. Since Mangalore is a coastal town, fish forms the staple diet of most people.[1] Mangalorean Catholics' Sanna-Dukra Maas (Sanna – idli fluffed with toddy or yeast; Dukra Maas – Pork), Pork Bafat, Sorpotel and the Mutton Biryani of the Muslims are well-known dishes. Pickles such as happala, sandige and puli munchi are unique to Mangalore. Khali (toddy), a country liquor prepared from coconut flower sap, is popular.[2]

Non-vegetarian cuisine[edit]

Fish Roe Curry in Mangalorean Catholic style

Their curry uses a lot of coconut and curry leaves while ginger, garlic and chilli are also used. Mangalorean Catholic cuisine has distinct Portuguese influence as can be seen in Laitao, the famous pork roast served as the Pièce de résistance at wedding dinners, and Pork Sorpotel. Mangalorean Catholics mix pork blood and other parts in most of their pork delicacies as can be seen from Pork Bafat, Cabidela and Kalleze un Kiti (heart and intestines). Sanna-Dukra Maas (Sanna – idli fluffed with toddy or yeast; Dukra Maas – Pork)[2] and Unde-Dukra Maas (Unde – leavened bread; Dukra Maas – Pork) are popular dishes. Bifa Maas (beef), Bokrea Maas (mutton) and Kunkda Maas (chicken) with dishes such as Chicken Indaz are also popular. The traditional Rosachi kadi (Ros Curry), a fish curry made with ros (coconut milk) is quite popular and is served during the Ros (anointing) ceremony that is held 1 or 2 days before a Mangalorean Catholic wedding. Their fish curry especially their Fish Roe Curry, is known for its taste in the whole of coastal India while fried fish in their style is well known. The Sheveo Roce and Pathal Bakri (a variant of Kori Rotti) are dry rice flakes dipped in chicken gravy dishes.[3]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Typically home". The Hindu. 2007-08-11. Archived from the original on 2012-02-05. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  2. ^ a b Stephen D'Souza. "What's in a Name?". Daijiworld Media Pvt Ltd Mangalore. Archived from the original on 2008-03-05. Retrieved 2008-03-04. 
  3. ^ "Typically home". The Hindu. 2007-08-11. Archived from the original on 2012-02-05. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 

References[edit]