All Saints' Church, Bristol

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All Saints Church
All Saints' Church, Bristol, BRO Picbox-4-BCh-1, 1250x1250.jpg
General information
Town or city Bristol
Country England
Coordinates 51°27′14″N 2°35′42″W / 51.454019°N 2.595049°W / 51.454019; -2.595049
Completed 12th century

All Saints is an Anglican church in Corn Street, Bristol, England.

All Saints Bristol

The west end of the nave survives from the original 12th-century church, and the east nave and aisles were built in the 15th century. Alice Chestre made major donations to the church.[1] The north-east tower was added in 1716 by William Paul, and completed by George Townesend. The lantern was rebuilt by Luke Henwood in 1807, and the chancel rebuilt in the mid-19th century.

The Kalendars, a brotherhood of clergy and laity attached to All Saints, built a library over the north aisle of the church in the fifteenth century; by a deed of 1464 they gave free access to all who wished to study. This was the first 'public' library in the kingdom. In 1466 fire destroyed many of the manuscript books.

The church is surrounded on three sides by pedestrian passageways and built into surrounding buildings. Over the south nave is a priests' room and over the north a Georgian coffee room. The most notable monument is to Edward Colston designed by James Gibbs and carved by John Michael Rysbrack.[2]

It is used as a Diocesan Education Centre.[3]

It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.[4]

Archives[edit]

Parish records for All Saints' Church, Bristol are held at Bristol Record Office (Ref. P.AS) (online catalogue), including baptism, marriage and burial registers. The archive also includes records of the incumbent, overseer of the poor, churchwardens, charities, chantries and vestry, plus deeds, maps, plans and surveys.

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Manco, Jean. "The House that Alice Built". Bristol Past. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  2. ^ Burrough, THB (1970). Bristol. London: Studio Vista. ISBN 0-289-79804-3. 
  3. ^ "Diocesan Education Centre". Retrieved 19 December 2010. 
  4. ^ "Church of All Saints". Images of England. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 

External links[edit]