Ammon, Idaho

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Ammon, Idaho
City
Peterson Park
Peterson Park
Location of Ammon in Bonneville County, Idaho.
Location of Ammon in Bonneville County, Idaho.
Ammon, Idaho is located in the US
Ammon, Idaho
Ammon, Idaho
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 43°28′35″N 111°58′5″W / 43.47639°N 111.96806°W / 43.47639; -111.96806Coordinates: 43°28′35″N 111°58′5″W / 43.47639°N 111.96806°W / 43.47639; -111.96806
Country United States
State Idaho
County Bonneville
Incorporated 1905
Government
 • Mayor Sean Coletti
Area[1]
 • Total 7.46 sq mi (19.33 km2)
 • Land 7.45 sq mi (19.30 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 4,715 ft (1,437 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 13,816
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 15,252
 • Density 2,046.70/sq mi (790.21/km2)
Time zone Mountain (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) Mountain (UTC-6)
ZIP code 83406
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-01990
GNIS feature ID 0396038
Website www.ci.ammon.id.us

Ammon is an edge city of Idaho Falls in Bonneville County, Idaho, United States. As of the 2010 US Census, the population of Ammon was 13,816.[4]

Ammon is a suburb, directly east of Idaho Falls, Idaho.

Ammon was one of Idaho’s fastest growing cities from 2000 to 2010. The City of Ammon experienced a 123.3% growth rate from 2000 to 2010 based on the 2010 US Census. Ammon is the 17th largest city in Idaho.

The City’s rapid growth is due to the availability of affordable residential housing and proximity to the job market in Idaho Falls.

History[edit]

A monument erected in 1937 by local Boy Scouts honors the early settlers of Ammon

Ammon was founded by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1888.[5][6] It was originally called South Iona because it was the dependent branch in the south end of the Iona, Idaho ward. The area was made a ward in the church in 1889 with Arthur M. Rawson as bishop, who renamed the town in honor of Ammon, a figure in the LDS book of scripture, the Book of Mormon. Since it was now independent of the Iona Ward, a new name seemed appropriate. On February 9, 1893, the name of the town was changed from South Iona Ward to Ammon.[7]

By 1930 the village of Ammon had 270 inhabitants, but the total district of Ammon, which is how the name is usually used and is closer to the modern borders, had a population of about 1100.[8]

Ammon was an early agricultural center and later was home to several general stores, a grain elevator and a brickyard. The city was officially incorporated on October 10, 1905. It became a Second Class City under Idaho law in 1963. In the early 1900s a spur line was built by the Union Pacific Railroad to the Ammon Elevator. Beginning in the 1940s housing divisions have aided the city's growth and it has become a suburb for the adjacent city of Idaho Falls. Building boomed in the 1990s in both the business and housing sectors, and the city was one of the fastest growing in Idaho from 2000 to 2010.

Education[edit]

Ammon is served by the Bonneville Joint School District#93. District #93 serves about 10,758 students in 19 schools, making it the fifth-largest by enrollment in the state of Idaho. The district has: 13 elementary schools serving students in K-6, two middle schools serving students in grades 7-8, and two high schools serving students in grades 9-12, along with an alternative high school.

High schools[edit]

Southeast Entrance of Bonneville High School
The west entrance to Hillcrest High School
  • Thunder Ridge High School (scheduled to open in fall 2018)

Alternative high schools[edit]

  • Lincoln Alternative High School

Middle schools[edit]

  • Rocky Mountain Middle School
  • Sandcreek Middle School

Elementary schools[edit]

  • Ammon Elementary School
  • Bridgewater Elementary School
  • Cloverdale Elementary School
  • Discovery Elementary School
  • Fairview Elementary School
  • Falls Valley Elementary School
  • Hillview Elementary School
  • Iona Elementary School
  • Mountain Valley Elementary School
  • Rimrock Elementary School
  • Summit Hills Elementary School
  • Tiebreaker Elementary School
  • Ucon Elementary School
  • Woodland Hills Elementary School

Geography[edit]

Ammon is located at 43°28′35″N 111°58′5″W / 43.47639°N 111.96806°W / 43.47639; -111.96806 (43.476268, -111.967964).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.27 square miles (18.83 km2), of which, 7.26 square miles (18.80 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[10]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 214
1920 378 76.6%
1930 270 −28.6%
1940 363 34.4%
1950 447 23.1%
1960 1,882 321.0%
1970 2,545 35.2%
1980 4,669 83.5%
1990 5,002 7.1%
2000 6,187 23.7%
2010 13,816 123.3%
Est. 2016 15,252 [3] 10.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
The Ammon City Building

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 13,816 people, 4,476 households, and 3,352 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,903.0 inhabitants per square mile (734.8/km2). There were 4,747 housing units at an average density of 653.9 per square mile (252.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.1% White, 0.5% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.2% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.4% of the population.

There were 4,476 households of which 46.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 25.1% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.05 and the average family size was 3.61.

The median age in the city was 29.6 years. 36.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.5% were from 25 to 44; 18.7% were from 45 to 64; and 9.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.9% male and 51.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 Census there were 1,843 households out of which 49.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.0% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.1% were non-families. 13.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.27 and the average family size was 3.62.

In 2000 the city the population was spread out with 36.3% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 18.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city in 2000 was $47,820, and the median income for a family was $51,544. Males had a median income of $41,126 versus $21,301 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,535. About 3.4% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.0% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 26, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  4. ^ Ammon (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau Accessed 13 March 2012
  5. ^ Andrew Jenson. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1941) p. 22
  6. ^ Old Ammon: The First Fifty Years. by Miranda Stringham, Ricks College Press, Rexburg, Idaho, 1984
  7. ^ Jenson, Andrew (2009). Church chronology: a record of important events pertaining to the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. BiblioBazaar. p. 201. ISBN 1-115-24708-5. 
  8. ^ Jenson. Encyclopedic History. p. 22
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]