Oneida County, Idaho

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Oneida County, Idaho
Oneida County Courthouse Malad Idaho.jpeg
Oneida County Courthouse in Malad City
Seal of Oneida County, Idaho
Seal
Map of Idaho highlighting Oneida County
Location in the U.S. state of Idaho
Map of the United States highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the U.S.
Founded January 22, 1864
Named for Oneida Lake, New York
Seat Malad City
Largest city Malad City
Area
 • Total 1,202 sq mi (3,113 km2)
 • Land 1,200 sq mi (3,108 km2)
 • Water 1.5 sq mi (4 km2), 0.1%
Population (est.)
 • (2017) 4,427
 • Density 3.6/sq mi (1.4/km2)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7/−6
Website oneidacountyid.com

Oneida County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. As of the 2010 Census the county had a population of 4,286.[1] The county seat and largest city is Malad City.[2] Most of the county's population lives in Malad City and the surrounding Malad Valley.

History[edit]

The county is named for Oneida Lake, New York, the area from which most of the early settlers had emigrated.[3]

Oneida County was organized on January 22, 1864 with its county seat established at Soda Springs in present-day Caribou County.[4] The county seat was moved to Malad City in 1866 because of its population growth and location on the freight road and stagecoach line between Corinne, Utah, and the mines in Butte, Montana.

Early in its lengthy history, Oneida County had the distinction of being Idaho's largest county by both area and population. Its initial size was 32,708 mi2 making it the third largest of the 17 counties created by the first legislature of Idaho Territory in 1863 and early 1864. When the US Congress created Montana Territory on May 26, 1864, it also transferred a portion of Oneida County over to Dakota Territory. Even with the loss of territory, the act left Oneida County as Idaho's largest remaining Idaho county at 20,621 mi2. Alturas County exchanged territory with Boise County in 1866 to increase its land area above that of Oneida County. Oneida County lost significant territory to Wyoming Territory in 1868, to the creation of Bear Lake County in 1875, and to the creation of Cassia County in 1879. Minor adjustments to boundaries occurred in 1871, 1875, and 1877. Creation of Bingham County in 1885 left Oneida County with only 2,633 mi2, while creation of Franklin and Power Counties further reduced the county's area to 1,219 mi2 in 1913. Minor changes to boundaries occurred in 1917 and 1927 that gave Oneida County its present land area.

Early loss of territory had no impact on population growth of the county as some areas lost had almost no population or were offset by heavy migration of Mormons occurring along Idaho's southern border. Oneida County was officially Idaho Territory's 3rd most populous behind Boise and Ada counties at Idaho Territory's first decennial census in 1870. However, the county's actual population was severely undercounted as a result of its lack of a surveyed southern boundary. The survey of Idaho's southern border by 1872 revealed that the 1870 Census had erroneously assigned eight Idaho settlements in the Bear Lake Valley to Rich County, Utah and five Idaho settlements in the Cache Valley to Cache County, Utah. Had the settlements been accurately assigned to Oneida County in 1870, the county would have been Idaho's largest with 4,647 residents.[5][6] Oneida County would go on to officially become Idaho's most populous county at the 1880 Census with 6,964 residents even after it had lost populated territory to creation of Bear Lake and Cassia Counties.[7] The loss of large population centers achieved through the creation of Bingham County resulted in the county's first decline in population at the 1890 Census. While diminished in significance, the county was still one of the State's more prominent counties at that time. Oneida County did retain developing population centers at Malad City, American Falls, and Preston. Their growth led to a peak in the county's population at the 1910 Census. The county lost much of its prominence with the creation of Franklin and Power Counties in 1913. The loss in territory again caused a population decline while Malad City and even outlying areas experienced growth through the 1920 Census. After the 1920 Census, Oneida County experienced fifty years of population decline, losing more than half of its 1920 population by the 1970 Census. The county has regained less than 40% of its lost population as of the 2016 Census estimate.[8]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,202 square miles (3,110 km2), of which 1,200 square miles (3,100 km2) is land and 1.5 square miles (3.9 km2) (0.1%) is water.[9]

Elkhorn Peak is the county's highest point, at 9,095 feet (2,772 m) above sea level. Alternating valleys and ridges of mountains or hills typify the topography, with grassland and sagebrush covering most areas. The Curlew National Grassland lies within the county.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18701,922
18806,964262.3%
18906,819−2.1%
19008,93331.0%
191015,17069.8%
19206,723−55.7%
19305,870−12.7%
19405,417−7.7%
19504,387−19.0%
19603,603−17.9%
19702,864−20.5%
19803,25813.8%
19903,4927.2%
20004,12518.1%
20104,2863.9%
Est. 20174,427[10]3.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790–1960[12] 1900–1990[13]
1990–2000[14] 2010–2013[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 4,125 people, 1,430 households, and 1,092 families residing in the county. The population density was 3 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 1,755 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.50% White, 0.12% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.36% from other races, and 0.48% from two or more races. 2.30% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 27.2% were of English, 20.0% Welsh, 12.0% American, 7.1% German, and 6.8% Danish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 1,430 households out of which 38.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.50% were married couples living together, 4.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.60% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the county, the population was spread out with 32.00% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 23.10% from 25 to 44, 21.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 103.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,309, and the median income for a family was $38,341. Males had a median income of $29,730 versus $19,808 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,829. About 6.70% of families and 10.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.00% of those under age 18 and 10.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,286 people, 1,545 households, and 1,161 families residing in the county.[16] The population density was 3.6 inhabitants per square mile (1.4/km2). There were 1,906 housing units at an average density of 1.6 per square mile (0.62/km2).[17] The racial makeup of the county was 96.7% white, 0.5% Asian, 0.5% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 1.1% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.9% of the population.[16] In terms of ancestry, 38.3% were English, 15.1% were Welsh, 12.8% were American, 10.7% were German, 5.8% were Swedish, and 5.1% were Danish.[18]

Of the 1,545 households, 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.9% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.9% were non-families, and 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.24. The median age was 39.1 years.[16]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,599 and the median income for a family was $51,371. Males had a median income of $43,362 versus $24,821 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,950. About 11.9% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.2% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.[19]

Arts and culture[edit]

Museums and other points of interest[edit]

Oneida County contains seven buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

Notable people[edit]

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results
Previous presidential elections results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 74.0% 1,531 8.9% 184 17.1% 353
2012 88.0% 1,838 10.4% 217 1.6% 34
2008 79.7% 1,724 17.6% 381 2.6% 57
2004 83.9% 1,789 14.3% 304 1.9% 40
2000 79.3% 1,426 17.1% 307 3.6% 65
1996 57.5% 993 24.9% 429 17.6% 304
1992 38.2% 713 18.8% 351 43.0% 802[a]
1988 70.1% 1,269 28.1% 508 1.8% 33
1984 80.5% 1,528 19.0% 360 0.5% 10
1980 74.2% 1,461 22.0% 434 3.8% 75
1976 61.1% 1,065 36.6% 637 2.3% 40
1972 71.5% 1,204 23.9% 402 4.7% 79
1968 66.2% 1,114 27.6% 465 6.2% 105
1964 59.1% 1,111 40.9% 768
1960 58.2% 1,111 41.8% 799
1956 64.2% 1,324 35.8% 738
1952 67.6% 1,547 32.3% 739 0.0% 1
1948 48.5% 962 50.9% 1,008 0.6% 12
1944 43.2% 935 56.7% 1,227 0.1% 1
1940 44.1% 1,140 55.7% 1,440 0.2% 4
1936 36.2% 955 63.4% 1,673 0.4% 10
1932 41.7% 1,047 57.6% 1,449 0.7% 18
1928 53.6% 1,184 46.1% 1,020 0.3% 7
1924 42.8% 956 33.5% 747 23.7% 530
1920 66.6% 1,500 33.4% 752
1916 43.3% 1,014 55.4% 1,298 1.3% 31
1912 60.4% 2,373 35.3% 1,386 4.3% 169
1908 61.5% 2,595 35.9% 1,512 2.6% 110
1904 74.3% 2,839 23.7% 906 2.0% 75
1900 60.8% 1,891 39.3% 1,222

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The leading candidate, Independent Ross Perot, received 590 votes while Independent James Gritz received 210 votes, Libertarian Andre Marrou and Independent Lenora Fulani each received 1 vote.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Idaho.gov – Oneida County Archived 2009-08-15 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 2009-05-29
  4. ^ "An Act Creating the County of Oneida", Session Laws of Idaho Territory: 1863–1864, p. 625
  5. ^ Ninth Census--Volume I (PDF). Washington: Government Printing Office. 1872. pp. 23, 275–276. Retrieved June 30, 2017. 
  6. ^ "The Southern Boundary of Idaho". Idaho Museum of Natural History. Retrieved June 30, 2017. 
  7. ^ 1880 Census, v.1-08 p. 56
  8. ^ Idaho Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. Chicago: The Newberry Library. 2010. pp. 13, 162–172. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved Apr 7, 2018. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09. 
  17. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09. 
  18. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09. 
  19. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09. 
  20. ^ "William Marion Jardine". NNDB. Retrieved September 25, 2012. 
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-04-04. 

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 42°13′N 112°31′W / 42.21°N 112.52°W / 42.21; -112.52