Aurora (Foo Fighters song)

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"Aurora"
Song by Foo Fighters from the album There Is Nothing Left to Lose
Released November 2, 1999
2002
Recorded March–June 1999
December 04, 2002 (Live)
Genre Alternative rock
Length 5:50
9:08 (Live)
Label Roswell/RCA
Writer Dave Grohl
Producer Foo Fighters and Adam Kasper
Foo Fighters and Nick Raskulinecz (Live)
There Is Nothing Left to Lose track listing
"Generator"
(5)
"Aurora"
(6)
"Live-In Skin"
(7)

"Aurora" is a song by Foo Fighters and the sixth track on their 1999 album There Is Nothing Left to Lose.

It is played live more than any other non-single track from the album.[1] A live version recorded on December 4, 2002 at the Oslo Spektrum was released with the Special Norwegian Edition of One by One. Two different versions appear on Everywhere but Home.

Concept[edit]

"Aurora" is about questioning the meaning of life. Dave Grohl described song as a "nostalgic look back at Seattle and the life I once had".[2] The song is also inspired by the death of Grohl's grandmother.[3]

Structure[edit]

Clocking in at 5:50, "Aurora" is the longest song on the album and one of the longest songs by the band. "Aurora" showcases the album's emphasis of melody, as opposed to their previous two albums Foo Fighters and The Colour and the Shape, with atmospheric touches.[4]

According to Grohl, Aurora was just an instrumental and sat down to think of the lyrics for the song and surprised himself "because nothing was preconceived" and no idea where it was going.[5] Many listeners believe that the song's rhythm section includes a synthesizer, however, it's actually a delay pedal being used on one or more of the song's guitar tracks, growing stronger and stronger until the end of the song.

Reception[edit]

"Aurora" is a very popular song within Foo Fighters, cited as one of the band's favorite songs ever recorded on various occasions.[2][6][7] Dave Grohl says he loves the song because "of what it represents to me", being the first time all the band members connected in the song writing process, claiming they have "grabbed this thing out of thin air and it was beautiful".[6] Rolling Stone comments that Dave Grohl sounds "star-struck" on "Aurora".[8] NME says the song shows Dave Grohl's adeptness in writing love songs and adds "you once never thought this band had the grace to pull off".[9] Spin compared the song to the band XTC, stating it will appeal to fans of the band.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Foo Fighters Tour Statistics". setlist.fm. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  2. ^ a b "There Is Nothing Left To Lose : Dave Grohl's Guide To Every Song". Foo Archive. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  3. ^ The Dave Grohl Story - Jeff Apter - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2005-12-01. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  4. ^ Thompson, Stephen (1999-11-02). "Foo Fighters: There Is Nothing Left To Lose | Music | Music Review". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  5. ^ "Grohl - RHYTHM 2001". Fooarchive.com. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  6. ^ a b "10 Questions for Dave Grohl - Video". TIME.com. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  7. ^ "Interviews - Guitar Center". Gc.guitarcenter.com. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  8. ^ Greg Kot (1999-11-11). "There Is Nothing Left To Lose | Album Reviews". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  9. ^ "NME Album Reviews - There Is Nothing Left To Lose". Nme.Com. 1999-11-01. Retrieved 2011-11-12. 
  10. ^ Out - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2011-11-12.