Barholm

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Barholm
Church at Barholm - geograph.org.uk - 131492.jpg
Church at Barholm
Barholm is located in Lincolnshire
Barholm
Barholm
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceTF0910
• London80 mi (130 km) S
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townStamford
Postcode districtPE9
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
52°40′N 0°23′W / 52.67°N 00.38°W / 52.67; -00.38Coordinates: 52°40′N 0°23′W / 52.67°N 00.38°W / 52.67; -00.38

Barholm /ˈbærəm/[1] is a village in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It is 2 miles (3 km) west from the A15 road, and 6 miles (10 km) south from Bourne.

Barholm is first recorded as "Berc(a)ham" in 1086; the name is from Old English beorg + hām or hamm and means "homestead or enclosure on a hill."[2]

Hereward (later known as Hereward the Wake) owned land in Barholm and the nearby village of Stowe in the period before the Norman conquest in 1066.[citation needed]

St Martin's Church is Grade I listed.[3] The church received a new tower during the English Civil War and an inscription with the date 1648 reads:

"Was ever such a thing
Since the Creation?
A new steeple built
In the time of vexation."

Local government[edit]

Barholm and Stowe is a civil parish. It is run through a parish meeting of its residents rather than a parish council, two district councillors who represent Casewick Ward on South Kesteven District Council and a county councillor representing Deepings West & Rural Division on Lincolnshire County Council. The district councillors elected in May 2011 and re-elected in 2015 are Kelham Cooke (Con) and Rosemary Trollope-Bellew (Con). The county councillor elected in 2017 is Rosemary Trollope-Bellew (Con).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miller, G.M., BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names, Oxford University Press (1971), p. 11.
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names, Oxford University Press, 2nd ed. (1998), p. 24.
  3. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Martin  (Grade I) (1360165)". National Heritage List for England.

External links[edit]