Bombardier Double-deck Coach

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
In use by Deutsche Bahn
In use by Israel Railways

The Bombardier Double-deck Coach is a bilevel passenger car built by Bombardier Transportation (formerly by Adtranz) used by various European railways and Israel Railways. The current generation of double-deck coaches can be run at speeds up to 160 km/h (100 mph). Depending on their configuration, each coach can seat 100 to 150 passengers.

History[edit]

The ancestry of these coaches can be traced back to double-deck coaches built by WUMAG at Görlitz for the LübeckBüchenHamburg railway in 1935. They were push-pull trains with a cab car that could control the steam locomotive at the other end of the train.

After World War II, these coaches were developed further by VEB Waggonbau Görlitz (formerly WUMAG) into double-deck trains of two to five cars sharing bogies. Starting in 1974, single coaches were built again that were the direct ancestors of today's double-deck coaches. These trainsets were used by Deutsche Reichsbahn of the GDR as well as several other railways of the eastern bloc in large numbers (about 4000). After 1990, VEB Waggonbau Görlitz became part of Deutsche Waggonbau AG (DWA) which was acquired by Bombardier Transportation in 1998.

First Generation[edit]

Build years 1973–1974 and 1976–1991, sold to East Germany, Bulgaria, Poland, Romania, Czechoslovakia.

Media related to Driving double-decker carriages of Germany 1st headshape at Wikimedia Commons

1. Generation Doppelstockwagen in Calau

German national railways
DB class Vmax count UIC type notes
777 120 DABbuzf cab car
778 140 DABbuzf cab car

Second Generation[edit]

Build years 1992-1993 for Germany (Deutsche Reichsbahn and Deutsche Bundesbahn, later named DB Class 760.

Media related to Driving double-decker carriages of Germany 2nd_headshape at Wikimedia Commons

2. Generation Doppelstockwagen on first delivery

German national railways
DB class Vmax count UIC type notes
760 140 100 DABbuzf cab car

Third Generation[edit]

Built between 1994 and 1997 under the DWA brand for Germany's (Deutsche Bahn).

Media related to Driving double-decker carriages of Germany 3rd_headshape at Wikimedia Commons

3. Generation Doppelstockwagen in Gießen

German national railways
DB class Vmax count UIC type notes
761 140 58 DABbzf cab car
762 140 31 DABpbzf cab car

Fourth Generation[edit]

Built since 1997 and sold under the Bombardier brand to railways in Germany, Denmark, Israel and others.

Media related to Driving double-decker carriages of Deutsche Bahn 4th headshape at Wikimedia Commons

4. Generation Doppelstockwagen in Ribnitz-Damgarten Ost

German national railways
DB class Vmax count UIC type notes
763 160 50 DABpbzf cab car (originally 140 km/h)
764 140 39 DABpbzf cab car
765 160 55 DABpbzfa cab car (originally 160 km/h)
766 160 55 DABpbzfa cab car
767 160 DABpbzfa cab car
Luxembourg National Railway Company
Class Vmax count UIC type notes
Dosto 160 20 cab car
15 first/second class car
52 second class car
Danish State Railways
Class Vmax count UIC type notes
ABs 160 25 Cab car; First/second class car with room for bicycles
B 62 Second class car
Bk 26 Second class car with vending machine
Israel Railways
Class Vmax count UIC type notes
PC-103 140 24 Driving- and generator trailer
7
TC-101 68 second class car
18
82

Fifth Generation[edit]

test run of tilting double-deck coach pulled by a regular train

In 2008 Bombardier presented the "Dosto 2010" future family of double-deck trains for the German market. For international sales they were branded as Bombardier TWINDEXX with a "Vario" concept that allows these trains to be built for regional or intercity connections up to 160 km/h. The high-speed rail versions are named Bombardier TWINDEXX Express allowing up to 230 km/h. A tilting variant of the Twindexx is developed for the Swiss railway named Bombardier TWINDEXX Swiss Express. Orders have been placed in the range of a few hundred coaches of the different variants with their initial delivery expected to be during 2015.

External links[edit]