Casey Hampton

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Casey Hampton
refer to caption
Hampton during 2011 NFL season
No. 98
Position: Nose tackle
Personal information
Born: (1977-09-03) September 3, 1977 (age 41)
Galveston, Texas
Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight: 325 lb (147 kg)
Career information
High school: Galveston (TX) Ball
College: Texas
NFL Draft: 2001 / Round: 1 / Pick: 19
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles: 374
Sacks: 9.0
Forced fumbles: 4
Fumble recoveries: 2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Casey Hampton Jr. (born September 3, 1977), nicknamed "Big Snack," is a former American football nose tackle who played twelve seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Texas, and received All-American recognition. The Pittsburgh Steelers picked him in the first round of the 2001 NFL Draft. Hampton was selected for the Pro Bowl five times.

Early years[edit]

Hampton was born in Galveston, Texas.[1] He attended Ball High School in Galveston, Texas, and was a letterman in football and track. He was twice named as the District Defensive Player of the Year, and as a senior, he was a Texas Class 5A All-State first-team selection. His Ball High jersey number (No. 63) was retired at a dinner and parade on April 6, 2009. Hampton is the only football player in school history to receive such an honor.[2]

In track & field, Hampton was one of the state's top performers in the throwing events. He had top throws of 16.13 meters in the shot put and 48.08 meters in the discus throw.

College career[edit]

Hampton attended the University of Texas, and started 37 consecutive games for the Texas Longhorns football team between 1997 and 2000. He became the first defensive lineman to lead the team in tackles two consecutive seasons (1999–2000), and recorded 329 tackles (177 solos) to rank 11th on the school's all-time list. Hampton registered 56 quarterback pressures and caused nine fumbles in his college career. He earned consensus first-team All-American recognition as a senior, having received first-team honors from the Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, the Walter Camp Foundation.[3] He was also a first-team All-Big 12 Conference selection and the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year by the Conference Coaches.

Hampton was an All-America first-team selection by the Football Writers Association and Associated Press as a junior in 1999. In 1998, he was named the team's Most Consistent Defensive Player and started every game. That season, he recorded 60 tackles (29 solos) with two sacks and eight stops for losses and registered six quarterback pressures, five pass deflections and recovered one fumble. He also appeared in three games in 1997 before being granted a medical redshirt but played in every game as a true freshman in 1996, starting six at nose guard and recorded 77 tackles (51 solos), one sack and seven stops for losses.[4] In his freshman season, he also had three quarterback pressures and a forced fumble. Hampton majored in history.

In 2000, The Daily Texan, the student daily paper at Texas, characterized Hampton as "relentless," even quoting Hampton. "The way I see it, you never know when your last play is going to be," Texas' star defensive tackle said. "So you should go hard all the time. There's no reason to take a play off.." At the time, Hampton was 6'1 and 325 lbs and safety Greg Brown said "I have never seen him take a down off, he's just so intent on destroying people that he never takes time to rest. It's gotta be a gift." Hampton played with Shaun Rogers, a 2nd round pick of the Detroit Lions in 2001 and a Longhorn from 1997–2000; and after Hampton was quoted saying "No one guy can block me. Two guys can probably get it done but never one guy. I can always overpower one," the Daily Texan printed this: "He's says he's never even been caked. Ever," fellow defensive tackle Rogers said. "He says he wasn't even caked in junior high, but I, at least, am humble enough to say that I might have been once or twice. So I'd say some of what he says is questionable."[5]

Professional career[edit]

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 1 14 in
(1.86 m)
314 lb
(142 kg)
31 14 in
(0.79 m)
9 12 in
(0.24 m)
5.25 s 34 reps
All values are from NFL Combine[6][7]

2001[edit]

The Pittsburgh Steelers selected Hampton in the first round (19th overall) of the 2001 NFL Draft. Hampton was the fifth defensive tackle drafted in 2001.[8]

On July 22, 2001, the Pittsburgh Steelers signed Hampton to a five-year, $6.80 million contract with a signing bonus of $3.10 million.[9][10]

Throughout training camp, he competed for the job as the starting nose tackle against Kendrick Clancy. Head coach Bill Cowher named Hampton the backup nose tackle behind Kendrick Clancy to start the regular season.[11]

He made his professional regular season debut in the Pittsburgh Steelers' season-opening 21–3 loss at the Jacksonville Jaguars. On October 26, 2001, Pittsburgh Steelers' head coach Bill Cowher named Hampton the starting nose tackle for the remainder of the season, but stated he would still be rotated by Kendrick Clancy.[11] On October 29, 2001, Hampton earned his first career start and recorded two combined tackles during a 34–7 victory against the Tennessee Titans in Week 7.[12] In Week 9, he collected a season-high four combined tackles and made his first career sack on quarterback Tim Couch in the Steelers' 15–12 win at the Cleveland Browns.[12] He finished his rookie season in 2002 with 22 combined tackles (nine solo) and a sack in 16 games and 11 starts.[13] The Pittsburgh Steelers' defense was ranked as the No. 1 defense overall and also finished first against the run.[14]

The Pittsburgh Steelers finished first in the AFC Central with a 13–3 record and clinched a playoff berth. On January 20, 2002, Hampton started in his first career playoff game and recorded three combined tackles in a 27–10 victory against the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC Divisional Round.[12] The following week, he made two combined tackles in the Steelers' 34–17 loss to the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game.[12]

2002[edit]

Hampton entered training camp slated as the starting nose tackle and was officially named the starter to start the 2002 regular season. Defensive coordinator Tim Lewis also retained Aaron Smith and Kimo von Oelhoffen as the starting defensive ends.[15] He started in the Pittsburgh Steelers' season-opener at the New England Patriots and made three combined tackles in their 30–14 loss.[16] In Week 4, Hampton collected a season-high six combined tackles during a 16–13 win against the Cleveland Browns.[16] In Week 16, he collected two combined tackles, two forced fumbles, and had a season-high two sacks in the Steelers' 17–7 victory at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[16] Hampton forced a fumble by fullback Mike Alstott and recovered it for the first fumble recovery of his career in the second quarter. He also had a strip/sack on quarterback Rob Johnson and the ball was recovered by teammate Kendrell Bell to stop a potential touchdown on the Steelers' five-yard line in the third quarter. Hampton also sacked quarterback Shaun King and earned his first multi-sack game of his career.[17] He finished his second season with 40 combined tackles (23 solo), two sacks, and two forced fumbles in 16 games and 15 starts.[13]

2003[edit]

Hampton, Aaron Smith, and Kimo von Oelhoffen returned as the starting defensive line to start the 2003 regular season.[18] On September 14, 2003, Hampton collected a season-high three solo tackles and sacked quarterback Trent Green in a 41–20 loss at the Kansas City Chiefs in Week 2. In Week 14, he collected a season-high four combined tackles during a 6–0 loss at the New York Jets.[19] On December 18, 2003, Hampton was voted to the 2004 Pro Bowl and earned his first career Pro Bowl selection.[20] Hampton started all 16 regular season games in 2003 and made 39 combined tackles (27 solo), a pass deflection, and a sack.[13] The Pittsburgh Steelers finished third in the AFC North with a 6-10 record and did not qualify for the playoffs.

2004[edit]

On January 8, 2004, the Pittsburgh Steelers fired defensive coordinator Tim Lewis.[21] The Pittsburgh Steelers' new defensive coordinator, Dick LeBeau, retained Hampton as the starting nose tackle, alongside defensive ends Aaron Smith and Kimo von Oelhoffen.[22] In Week 2, he collected a season-high five combined tackles during a 30–13 loss at the Baltimore Ravens. On October 17, 2004, Hampton made one solo tackle before exiting late in the fourth quarter of a 24–20 victory at the Dallas Cowboys.[23] On October 20, 2004, the Pittsburgh Steelers placed Hampton on season-ending injured reserve due to a torn ACL in his right knee.[24] Hampton finished the season with 15 combined tackles (eight solo) in six games and six starts.[13]

2005[edit]

On August 22, 2005, the Pittsburgh Steelers signed Hampton to a five-year, $22.80 million contract extension with a signing bonus of $4 million.[25][26]

Hampton returned as the starter and anchored the defensive line in 2005, along with Smith and von Oelhoffen.[27] On October 31, 2005, Hampton recorded a season-high five combined tackles during the Steelers' 20–19 victory against the Baltimore Ravens in Week 8. He finished the season with 42 combined tackles (25 solo) in 16 games and 15 starts.[13]

The Pittsburgh Steelers finished second in the AFC North and clinched a wildcard berth. On January 8, 2006, Hampton recorded two solo tackles during a 31-17 victory at the Cincinnati Bengals in the AFC Wildcard Game.[28] On January 26, 2006, Hampton was selected to play in the 2006 Pro Bowl as a late replacement for New England Patriots' defensive end Richard Seymour, who was unable to participate due to an injury.[29] The Pittsburgh Steelers reached Super Bowl XL after defeating the Indianapolis Colts 21–18 in the AFC Divisional Round and the Denver Broncos 34–17 in the AFC Championship Game.[28] On February 5, 2006, Hampton recorded four solo tackles and sacked quarterback Matt Hasselbeck as the Steelers defeated the Seattle Seahawks 21–10 in Super Bowl XL.[28]

2006[edit]

Hampton returned as the starting nose tackle in 2006 and teamed with defensive ends Aaron Smith and Brett Kiesel.[30] He was inactive during the Steelers' Week 8 loss at the Oakland Raiders after injuring his hamstring the previous week.[31] In Week 8, he collected a season-high six combined tackles and deflected a pass during a 38–31 win against the New Orleans Saints.[32] On December 19, 2006, Hampton was named to the 2007 Pro Bowl.[33] He completed the season with 40 combined tackles (25 solo) and a pass deflection in 15 games and 15 starts.[13]

2007[edit]

On January 5, 2007, Pittsburgh Steelers' head coach Bill Cowher announced his retirement.[34] The Pittsburgh Steelers hired Minnesota Vikings' defensive coordinator Mike Tomlin. Tomlin retained defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau and named Hampton the starting nose tackle to start the regular season. Hampton was inactive during the Steelers' Week 5 victory against the Seattle Seahawks due to a hamstring injury.[35] On December 16, 2007, Hampton recorded a career-high eight combined tackles during a 29–22 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars in Week 15.[36] Hampton finished the season with 33 combined tackles (17 solo) and was credited with half a sack in 15 games and 15 starts.[13]

2008[edit]

Hampton, Kiesel, and Smith returned as the starting defensive linemen for the third consecutive season. He missed three consecutive games (Weeks 4–7) due to a groin injury.[37] Hampton returned in Week 8 and recorded a season-high six combined tackles during a 21–14 loss to the New York Giants. On November 30, 2008, he made two solo tackles and sacked quarterback Tom Brady during the Steelers' 33–10 win at the New England Patriots.[38] He finished the season in 2008 with 22 combined tackles (13 solo), a pass deflection, and a sack in 13 games and 13 starts.[13]

The Pittsburgh Steelers finished first in the AFC North with a 12–4 record and earned a playoff berth with a first round bye. The Steelers reached Super Bowl XL after defeating the San Diego Chargers 35–34 in the AFC Divisional Round and the Baltimore Ravens 23–14 in the AFC Championship Game.[38] On February 1, 2009, Hampton started in Super Bowl XL and made two combined tackles as the Steelers defeated the Arizona Cardinals 27–23.[38]

2009[edit]

Hampton started in the Pittsburgh Steelers' season-opener against the Tennessee Titans and collected a season-high five combined tackles in their 13–10 victory. In Week 3, he made two solo tackles and sacked quarterback Carson Palmer during a 23–20 loss at the Cincinnati Bengals. On December 20, 2009, Hampton tied his season-high of five combined tackles and was credited with half a sack during a 37–36 victory against the Green Bay Packers in Week 15.[39] On December 29, 2009, Hampton was selected to play in the 2010 Pro Bowl.[40] He started in all 16 games in 2009 and finished with career-high 43 combined tackles (23 solo) and a career-high 2.5 sacks.[13]

2010[edit]

On February 25, 2010, the Pittsburgh Steelers signed Hampton to a three-year, $21.30 million contract that includes $11 million guaranteed and a signing bonus of $6.50 million.[41][26]

Defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau retained Hampton, Kiesel, and Smith as the starting defensive linemen for the sixth consecutive season.[42] He was inactive for the Steelers' Week 2 victory at the Tennessee Titans due to a hamstring injury.[43] On October 3, 2010, Hampton made one solo tackle and sacked quarterback Joe Flacco in a 17–14 loss to the Baltimore Ravens in Week 4. In Week 15, he collected a season-high three combined tackles during a 22–17 loss to the New York Jets.[44] He completed the season with 20 combined tackles (ten solo) and a sack in 15 games and 14 starts.[13]

The Pittsburgh Steelers finished atop the AFC North with a 12–4 record and earned a first round bye. The Steelers defeated the Baltimore Ravens 31–24 in the AFC Divisional Round and the New York Jets 24–19 in the AFC Championship Game and reached Super Bowl XLV.[44] On February 6, 2011, Hampton started in Super Bowl XLV and made one solo tackle as the Steelers lost 31–25 against the Green Bay Packers.[44]

2011[edit]

Hampton was sidelined for three games (Weeks 5–7) due to a shoulder injury he sustained the previous week.[45] In Week 14, he collected a season-high six combined tackles in the Steelers' 14–3 victory against the Cleveland Browns.[46] Hampton finished his 11th season with the Pittsburgh Steelers with 31 combined tackles (17 solo) in 13 games and 12 starts.[13]

2012[edit]

During the offseason, Hampton underwent surgery on his ACL. On March 15, 2012, Hampton agreed to restructure his contract to remain with the Steelers. His base salary was changed from $4.89 million to $2.80 million.[47] Head coach Mike Tomlin named Hampton the starting nose tackle to start the season, ahead of Steve McLendon. He started alongside Brett Kiesel and Ziggy Hood.[48] In Week 11, he collected a season-high four combined tackles during a 13–10 loss to the Baltimore Ravens. In Week 16, he tied his season-high jof four combined tackles during the Steelers' 13–10 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.[49] He started all 16 games in 2012 and recorded 26 combined tackles (11 solo).[13]

For his career, he has played in 157 regular season games, recording 350 tackles, 9.0 sacks, three pass deflected, four forced fumbles, and two recovered fumbles.

NFL career statistics[edit]

Legend
Won the Super Bowl
Bold Career high
Year Team Games Comb Solo Ast Sacks FF FR FR Yds Int Int Yds Avg Lng TD PD
2001 PIT 16 22 9 13 1.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2002 PIT 16 40 23 17 2.0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2003 PIT 16 39 27 12 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2004 PIT 6 15 8 7 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2005 PIT 16 42 25 17 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2006 PIT 15 41 26 15 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2007 PIT 15 33 17 16 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2008 PIT 13 22 13 9 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2009 PIT 16 43 23 20 2.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 PIT 15 20 10 10 1.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2011 PIT 13 31 17 14 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2012 PIT 16 26 11 15 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Career 173 374 209 165 9.0 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

[50]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hampton on Pro-Football-Reference". rbref.com. Retrieved 2007-12-22. 
  2. ^ "Hampton honored in his hometown", steelers.com, archived from the original on 2009-04-09 
  3. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 24, 2012.
  4. ^ Casey Hampton | PLAYERS | NFLPLAYERS.COM
  5. ^ Casey Hampton dominates trenches, charges toward All-American season - Sports Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ "NFL Combine Results: Casey Hampton". nflcombineresults.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  7. ^ "Texas DT Casey Hampton : 2001 NFL Draft Scout Player Profile". NFLDraftScout.com. Retrieved April 23, 2001. 
  8. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/2001/nfldraft/players/99025.html
  9. ^ "Pittsburgh Steelers Transaction: November 17, 2001". assets.espn.go.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  10. ^ Dulac, Gerry (July 23, 2001). "Hampton's job is to make new house 'home'". old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  11. ^ a b Dulac, Greg (October 26, 2001). "Hampton will get first start". old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  12. ^ a b c d "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2001)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (career)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  14. ^ Bouchette, Ed (January 16, 2002). "Mighty Casey Hampton adds weight to top defense". old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  15. ^ "2002 Pittsburgh Steelers Roster". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  16. ^ a b c "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2002)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  17. ^ Associated Press (December 23, 2002). "Steelers Defeat the Buccy". NYtimes.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  18. ^ "2003 Pittsburgh Steelers Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  19. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2003)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  20. ^ "2004 Pro Bowl teams". USAToday30.USAToday.com. December 18, 2003. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  21. ^ Associated Press (January 8, 2004). "Steelers recently fired two black assistants". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  22. ^ "2004 Pittsburgh Steelers Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  23. ^ "Roethlisberger first rookie QB 4-0 since '79". ESPN.com. October 18, 2004. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  24. ^ "BGI Injury Report: Hampton, Logan out for year". post-gazette.com. October 20, 2004. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  25. ^ Bouchette, Ed (August 22, 2005). "Steelers sign Hampton to new five-year contract". post-gazette.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  26. ^ a b "Spotrac.com: Casey Hampton contract". Spotrac.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  27. ^ "2005 Pittsburgh Steelers Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  28. ^ a b c "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2005)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  29. ^ Wexell, Jim (January 27, 2006). "Notebook: Steelers rally around Pro Bowler". 247Sports.com. Retrieved June 23, 2018. 
  30. ^ "Pittsburgh Steelers Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  31. ^ "Steelers Notebook: Injuries lead to 2 pickups". Post-Gazette.com. November 1, 2006. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  32. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2006)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  33. ^ "Four Steelers named to Pro Bowl". 247sports.com. December 19, 2006. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  34. ^ "Cowher resigns to spend more time with family". ESPN.com. January 5, 2007. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  35. ^ "Some good news for Steelers' defense". MercuryNews.com. October 2, 2007. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  36. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2007)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  37. ^ "Steelers @ Eagles injury news". bleedinggreennation.com. September 21, 2008. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  38. ^ a b c "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2008)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  39. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2009)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  40. ^ "2010 Pro Bowl Rosters". NFL.com. December 29, 2009. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  41. ^ Signorelli, Nick (February 25, 2010). "Steelers sign Casey Hampton to Three-Year Deal". BleacherReport.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  42. ^ "Ourlads.com: Pittsburgh Steelers Depth Chart: 09/05/2010". Ourlads.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  43. ^ "Pittsburgh Steelers @ Tennessee Titans Wednesday Injury Report". musiccitymiracles.com. September 15, 2010. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  44. ^ a b c "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2010)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  45. ^ "Injuries pile up for Steelers: Hampton, Smith, others out Sunday". Post-Gazette.com. October 7, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  46. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2011)". Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  47. ^ Hangst, Andrea (March 15, 2012). "Pittsburgh Steelers NT Casey Hampton Restructures Contract, Helps Cap Situation". bleacherreport.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  48. ^ "Ourlads.com: Pittsburgh Steelers Depth Chart: 10/01/2012". Ourlads.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  49. ^ "NFL Player stats: Casey Hampton (2012)". NFL.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018. 
  50. ^ "Casey Hampton Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 

External links[edit]