Clyde Mountain

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Clyde Mountain
KingsHighwayClydeMntn20050627.JPG
Kings Highway, ascending Clyde Mountain, heading west towards Braidwood.
Highest point
Elevation 781 m (2,562 ft) [1]
Coordinates 35°32′55″S 149°57′4″E / 35.54861°S 149.95111°E / -35.54861; 149.95111Coordinates: 35°32′55″S 149°57′4″E / 35.54861°S 149.95111°E / -35.54861; 149.95111[2][dead link]
Geography
Clyde Mountain is located in New South Wales
Clyde Mountain
Clyde Mountain
Clyde Mountain is located in Australia
Clyde Mountain
Clyde Mountain
Clyde Mountain (Australia)
Parent range Great Dividing Range
Climbing
Easiest route Kings Highway

Clyde Mountain, at an elevation of 781 metres (2,562 ft) AHD , is a mountain in the Southern Tablelands region of New South Wales, Australia.

Location and features[edit]

Clyde Mountain is located in the Great Dividing Range within the Monga National Park. The mountain is approximately 18 kilometres (11 mi) east of the town of Braidwood, approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the village of Nelligen, and approximately 27 kilometres (17 mi) west of the main coastal centre of Batemans Bay on the NSW South Coast.[1]

The road leading up towards the summit of Clyde Mountain is a 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) section of steep, winding section of the Kings Highway in New South Wales, Australia. It is the location of many crashes, 22% of all incidents on the Kings Highway occurring on a 40 kilometres (25 mi) stretch on and near the mountain.[3] There are three safety ramps (runaway truck ramps) for trucks or heavy vehicles which lose control of their speed or suffer brake failure. Slow vehicle turnouts have been added on the Clyde Mountain descent, which allows vehicles to pass trucks in low gear.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Map of Clyde Mountain, NSW". Bonzle Digital Atlas of Australia. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Place Name Search: Clyde Mountain". Geoscience Australia. Commonwealth Of Australia. 2010. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  3. ^ NRMA report on southern NSW and ACT Roads

4. http://www.ozatwar.com/ozatwar/demolition.htm