Duncansby Head

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Duncansby Head Lighthouse
John-o'-Groats
Duncansby Head lighthouse.JPG
Duncansby Head Lighthouse
LocationDuncansby Head
Scotland
United Kingdom
Coordinates58°38′39″N 3°01′30″W / 58.644039°N 3.025120°W / 58.644039; -3.025120Coordinates: 58°38′39″N 3°01′30″W / 58.644039°N 3.025120°W / 58.644039; -3.025120
Tower
Constructed1924
Designed byDavid Alan Stevenson Edit this on Wikidata
Constructionconcrete tower
Automated1997 Edit this on Wikidata
Height11 m (36 ft)
Shapesquare tower with balcony and lantern
Markingswhite tower, black lantern, ochre balcony
Power sourcemains electricity Edit this on Wikidata
OperatorNorthern Lighthouse Board[1][2]
RaconEdit this on Wikidata
Light
Focal height67 m (220 ft)
Intensity596,000 cd
Range22 nmi (41 km)
CharacteristicFl W 12 s

Duncansby Head (Scottish Gaelic: Ceann Dhunngain[3] or Dùn Gasbaith[4]) is the most northeasterly part of both the Scottish and British mainlands, slightly northeast of John o' Groats. It lies approximately 20 km (12 mi) east-southeast of Dunnet Head, the northernmost point of both the Scottish and British mainlands. Duncansby Head is located in Caithness, Highland, in north-eastern Scotland.[5] The headland juts into the North Sea, with the Pentland Firth to its north and west and the Moray Firth to its south.

Lighthouse[edit]

The point is marked by Duncansby Head Lighthouse, built by David Alan Stevenson in 1924.[6]

A minor public road leads from John o' Groats to Duncansby Head,[7] which makes Duncansby Head the farthest point by road from Land's End.

The Duncansby Head Site of Special Scientific Interest includes the 6.5-kilometre (4-mile) stretch of coast south to Skirza Head. It includes the Duncansby Stacks, prominent sea stacks just off the coast.[8]

Atomic Weapon Test[edit]

In 2016, it was reported in The Sunday Post newspaper that scientists from the Atomic Weapons Establishment in Aldemarston had proposed a nuclear weapon test on the Stacks of Duncansby in 1953, but that the prevailing wet weather was too much for contemporary electronics and the idea was shelved.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rowlett, Russ. "Lighthouses of Scotland: Highlands". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 10 May 2016.
  2. ^ Duncansby Head Northern Lighthouse Board. Retrieved 10 May 2016
  3. ^ Gaelic and Norse in the Landscape: Placenames in Caithness and Sutherland Archived 2011-09-21 at the Wayback Machine. Scottish National Heritage.
  4. ^ http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesC-E.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  5. ^ Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (1862). Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol. 3. Neill and Company. p. 499.
  6. ^ "Duncansby Head Lighthouse". The Museum of Scottish Lighthouses. Archived from the original on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 23 July 2014.
  7. ^ "Scothighlands - How to drive to Duncansby Head from John O'Groats". www.scothighlands.com. Retrieved 31 October 2019.
  8. ^ SSSI citation[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ "Experts nearly dropped an atomic bomb on a Scottish landmark in the 1950s - Sunday Post". Sunday Post. 31 October 2016. Retrieved 8 November 2018.

External links[edit]


Duncansby Stacks, rock pinnacles to the immediate south of Duncansby Head