Finnish parliamentary election, 1991

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Parliamentary elections were held in Finland on 17 March 1991, the first time a Finnish parliamentary election had been held on a single day.[1]

For the first time since 1962 the Social Democratic Party was displaced as the largest party in the Eduskunta, with the Centre Party winning 55 seats and forming the first centre-right, non-socialist government since 1964,[2] with Esko Aho as Prime Minister.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Centre Party 676,717 24.8 55 +15
Social Democratic Party 603,080 22.1 48 –8
National Coalition Party 526,487 19.3 40 –13
Left Alliance 274,639 10.1 19 –1
Green League 185,894 6.8 10 +6
Swedish People's Party 149,476 5.5 11 –1
Finnish Rural Party 132,133 4.8 7 –2
Finnish Christian League 83,151 3.1 8 +3
Liberal People's Party 21,210 0.8 1 +1
Women's Party 12,725 0.5 0 New
Pensioners' Party 10,762 0.4 0 0
Åland Coalition 9,344 0.3 1 0
Constitutional Right Party 7,599 0.3 0 0
Communist Workers' Party – For Peace and Socialism 6,201 0.2 0 New
Independent Non-aligned Pensioners 5,230 0.2 0 New
Greens 3,835 0.1 0
Humanity Party 2,831 0.1 0 New
Joint Responsibility Party of Pensioners and the Greens 2,807 0.1 0 New
Others 11,797 0.4 0
Invalid/blank votes 51,066
Total 2,776,984 100 200 0
Registered voters/turnout 4,060,778 68.4
Source: Tilastokeskus[3]
Popular vote
KESK
  
24.83%
SDP
  
22.12%
KOK
  
19.31%
VAS
  
10.08%
VIHR
  
6.82%
RKP
  
5.48%
SMP
  
4.85%
SKL
  
3.05%
LKP
  
0.78%
Others
  
2.68%
Parliament seats
KESK
  
27.50%
SDP
  
24.00%
KOK
  
20.00%
VAS
  
9.50%
RKP
  
5.50%
VIHR
  
5.00%
SKL
  
4.00%
SMP
  
3.50%
LKP
  
0.50%
Others
  
0.50%

By Province[edit]

Province Centre Party Social Democratic Party National Coalition Party Left Alliance Green League Swedish People's Party Rural Party Christian League Liberal People's Party Electorate Votes Valid votes Invalid votes
Southern Savonia 32,762 25,057 15,827 3,098 5,472 0 5,219 4,248 137 136,246 94,026 92,536 1,490
Northern Savonia 50,820 23,808 18,139 18,812 9,369 0 9,603 4,187 644 198,532 137,691 136,008 1,683
North Karelia 31,849 27,616 12,402 4,762 3,687 0 5,219 4,679 456 135,563 93,426 92,018 1,408
Kainuu 25,025 5,415 4,681 10,380 2,032 0 1,643 1,427 276 73,204 52,166 51,522 644
Uusimaa 55,048 133,869 158,204 51,038 72,700 66,636 14,506 15,020 4,506 882,630 624,147 606,833 17,314
Eastern Uusimaa 5,480 9,104 5,656 2,036 2,767 16,423 1,076 736 225 64,626 45,583 44,663 920
Southwest Finland 54,669 54,374 52,863 26,805 11,348 12,473 15,160 4,670 839 331,626 242,317 238,321 3,996
Tavastia Proper 19,830 28,006 22,128 7,458 6,143 0 1,943 2,927 177 126,110 92,593 90,681 1,912
Päijänne Tavastia 18,337 24,896 28,713 8,844 8,248 135 5,601 5,009 217 153,066 103,944 101,664 2,280
Kymenlaakso 21,560 37,777 23,918 6,932 6,797 0 2,980 4,157 559 152,984 108,375 106,177 2,198
South Karelia 22,362 25,293 13,348 2,151 4,738 0 2,738 4,786 1,148 111,298 79,282 77,730 1,552
Central Finland 44,213 35,146 18,862 15,841 7,599 0 10,447 7,217 375 194,921 142,551 140,622 1,929
Southern Ostrobothnia 58,982 13,706 22,198 5,702 2,736 196 10,670 3,276 358 151,962 120,135 119,135 1,000
Ostrobothnia 10,758 17,164 8,336 6,624 3,027 48,646 1,879 2,394 550 130,603 101,151 100,205 946
Satakunta 32,203 39,104 28,548 20,488 6,332 0 6,985 3,916 349 191,700 142,335 139,915 2,420
Pirkanmaa 33,145 57,539 56,606 32,115 16,192 0 25,490 6,957 2,184 330,397 238,809 233,966 4,843
Central Ostrobothnia 18,906 6,442 2,766 2,518 932 3,246 2,326 3,510 283 51,978 41,640 41,174 466
Northern Ostrobothnia 82,748 20,375 20,856 25,405 10,991 0 6,042 2,538 7,367 246,074 180,451 178,227 2,224
Lapland 56,350 15,571 9,951 22,068 3,926 0 2,169 1,153 456 150,094 114,093 112,505 1,588
Åland Islands 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18,455 9,382 9,263 119
Source: European Election Database

Aftermath[edit]

The new center-right coalition government would not have an easy time governing the country. The fall of the Soviet Union caused a collapse in trade with the east, which together with a worldwide recession, caused major economic problems including high unemployment and ballooning budget deficits. In response, the government adopted strict austerity measures, such as cuts in public spending, the unpopularity of which led to the government's defeat in the 1995 elections.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p606 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Paavo Väyrynen (1993) It Is Time for the Truth 2: Facts and Memories About Mauno Koivisto's Finland, WSOY
  3. ^ Eduskuntavaalit 1927–2003[permanent dead link] Tilastokeskus 2004
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