Gerald Loeb Award winners for Magazines

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The Gerald Loeb Award is given annually for multiple categories of business reporting. The "Magazine" category is one of the two original categories awarded in 1958 (the other being "Newspaper"), with the last award given in 2014. The category included articles published the prior year in national and regional periodicals until 2008, when it was expanded to include magazine supplements to newspapers.[1] Previously, newspaper magazine supplements were entered into an appropriate newspaper category.[2] The "Magazine" and "Large Newspaper" categories were replaced by the "Feature" category in 2015.[3]

Gerald Loeb Award winners for Magazines (1958–2014)[edit]

He was awarded for his series on the maintenance and development of prosperous American cities through cooperation between municipal governments and businesses.[6]
Article:
"What's Happened to the Business Boom"[7], January 6, 1958[8]
Article:
"The United States Invents a New Way to Grow", January 23, 1960[10]
Articles in Series:
  1. April 1961[11]
  2. May 1961[11]
The article describes the May 28, 1962, stock market decline.[13]
Article:
"The Fluctuation",[13] August 31, 1963[14]
Article:
"Critical Examination of S.E.C. Proposals", November-December 1964[15]
Articles in Series:
  1. "The Real News About Automation",[17] January 1965[16]
  2. "The Comeback of the Blue Collar Worker",[17] February 1965[16]
Article:
"Antitrust in an Era of Radical Change", March 1966[18]
Article:
"Playboy Plays the Commodities Market",[19] August 1967[20]
Articles in Series:[22]
  1. "Annals of Finance: In Defense of Sterling – I",[23] March 23, 1968[22]
  2. "Annals of Finance: In Defense of Sterling – II",[24] March 30, 1968[22]
Article:
"Earnings: Can Anyone Believe the Numbers?",[25] Autumn 1969[26]
Article:
"Is More Less? Is Faster Slower? Is Bigger Smaller",[27] September 1970[28]
Article:
"Nixon's Frozen, Fleeting Dollar", August 30, 1971[29]
He was awarded for an article on real estate in the November-December issue.[30]
Article:
"How the Terrible Two Tier Market Came to Wall Street",[32] July 1973[33]
Article:
"Faisal and Oil",[34] January 6, 1975[35]
"Capital Crisis" was a special issue of Business Week magazine examining the ability of U.S. businesses to generate $4.5 trillion in new capital to maintain economic growth over the subsequent 10 years at the existing rate.[36]
Article:
"The Energy Debacle", August 1977[39]
Article:
"Environmentalism and the Leisure Class", December 1977[40]
Article:
"The Wreck of the Auto Industry", November 1980[43]
He was awarded for a two-part series on the Hunt brothers attempt to corner the world silver market.[44][45]
Articles in Series:
  1. "An American Fortune", April 1981[46]
  2. "Silver Thursday", May 1981[47]
His story examines American business mergers.[48]
Article:
"It's Time to Make a Deal", October 1982[49]
He was awarded for a series on personal finance.[50]
The story is an exposé on Robert Brennan and First Jersey Securities.[51]
They were awarded for an investigative piece on Financial Corporation of America.[51]
The story is an exposé on the American Association of Retired People.[55]
Article:
"The Empire Called AARP", October 1, 1988[56]
The story is about the investment firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.[55]
Article:
"Buyout Kings", July 4, 1988[57]
This investigative piece describes how injury lawyers skirt ethical lines to collect $10–$20 million a year in contingency fees.[58]
The story is about the Time-Warner merger.[59]
The story is about the Haft family business feud.[61]
They were awarded for providing intuitive and on-target economic analysis.[64]
His article exposed and added valuable data on a major problem in the automotive industry that confuses consumers.[66]
Articles in Series:
  1. "The Numbers Game", May 14, 2001[69]
  2. "Why Earnings Are Too Rosy", August 13, 2001[69]
  3. "Confused About Earnings?", November 26, 2001[69]
His article on offshore corporations led to follow-up reporting by others as well as proposed congressional legislation.[70]
Articles in Series:
  1. "Is Your Job Next?", Februyary 3, 2003[71]
  2. "The Rise Of India", December 8, 2003[71]
Her story proves that the HP-Compaq merger was a bust.[73]
His "beautiful and persuasive" story is about energy conservation and personal responsibility. It is a "wonderful example of explanatory journalism."[74]
His story about the subprime crisis stood out "in depth of reporting and quality of writing." He dissected a subprime mortgage deal to succinctly describe what happened and why. The story illustrated the conflicts of interested on Wall Street as firms sold subprime mortgages to investors while shorting similar investments.[75]
His story made the complex subject of catastrophe and insurance accessible and entertaining by focusing on a hedge fund manager's risk calculations designed to ensure the market absorbs the costs of large-scale disasters instead of the insurance industry alone.[75]
The story explained the Ponzi scheme perpetrated by Bernie Madoff.[77]
The story was about the death of Bennett's husband.[79]
Articles in Series:
  1. "End-of-Life Warning at $618,616 Makes Me Wonder Was It Worth It", March 4, 2010[80]
  2. "Chest Scan Costs $550 to $3,232 in Opaque Market for Radiology", March 4, 2010[80]
  3. "Avastin Dose Costing $6,600 became $27,360 in Hospital Billing", March 4, 2010[80]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Categories". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Archived from the original on January 19, 2008. Retrieved March 15, 2019 – via Internet Archive.
  2. ^ "Categories". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Archived from the original on August 30, 2006. Retrieved March 15, 2019 – via Internet Archive.
  3. ^ "2015 Categories". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Archived from the original on February 15, 2015. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  4. ^ "Business writers get Loeb Awards". The New York Times (Late City ed.). June 11, 1958. p. 53. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Historical Winners List". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  6. ^ "Ribicoff Hails Finance Writers". The Bridgeport Post. LXXV (135) (Final ed.). June 10, 1958. p. 32. Retrieved March 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ a b "Writers receive 1959 Loeb Awards". The New York Times. CVIII (37027) (Late City ed.). June 10, 1959. p. 75. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  8. ^ Havemann, Ernest (January 6, 1958). "What's Happenned to the Business Boom". Life. Vol. 44 no. 1. pp. 32–42. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  9. ^ "Sees commanding lead over red output". Fort Lauderdale News. June 9, 1960. p. 9-D. Retrieved February 14, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b "GBCEE speaker wins citation". The Bridgeport Post. LXXII (21). May 21, 1961. p. B-1. Retrieved February 27, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ a b c "Finance writers win Loeb Awards". The New York Times. CXI (38105) (Late City ed.). May 23, 1962. pp. 63, 69. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  12. ^ "Loeb Awards given financial writers". The Bridgeport Telegram. LXXII (105). May 2, 1963. p. 59. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b c "Two writers win top Loeb Awards". The New York Times. CXIII (38821) (Late City ed.). May 8, 1964. p. 52. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  14. ^ Brooks, John (August 31, 1963). "The Fluctuation". The New Yorker. Vol. XXXIX no. 28. pp. 34–55. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  15. ^ a b "2 buiness writers given Loeb Awards". The New York Times. CXIV (39191) (Late City ed.). May 13, 1965. p. 53. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  16. ^ a b c "Loeb Awards announced for editor and professor". The New York Times. CXV (39540). Associated Press. April 27, 1966. p. 94. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  17. ^ a b Goldberg, Maxwell H. (1969). "Needles, Burrs, and Bibliographies; Study Resources: Technological Change, Human Values, and the Humanities" (PDF). Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park. Center for Continuing Liberal Education. p. 164.[better source needed]
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  19. ^ a b "Finance writers get Loeb Awards". The New York Times. May 14, 1968. p. 67. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  20. ^ a b Devaney, James J. (May 22, 1968). "'Playboy', 'Monitor' Honored". Hartford Courant. CXXXI (143) (Final ed.). p. 36. Retrieved March 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Financial writers chosen for annual Loeb Award". The New York Times. May 8, 1969. p. 71. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  22. ^ a b c University of Connecticut Board of Trustees (April 16, 1969). "Minutes, April 16, 1969". University of Connecticut. p. 4109. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  23. ^ Brooks, John (March 23, 1968). "Annals of Finance: In Defense of Sterling – I". The New Yorker. pp. 44–96. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  24. ^ Brooks, John (March 30, 1968). "Annals of Finance: In Defense of Sterling – II". The New Yorker. pp. 43–101. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  25. ^ a b "4 writers to get Loeb awards". The Bridgeport Post. LXXXVII (122). Associated Press. May 25, 1970. p. 3. Retrieved February 14, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b University of Connecticut Board of Trustees (May 20, 1970). "Minutes, May 20, 1970". University of Connecticut. p. 4346. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  27. ^ a b "UConn names Loeb winners". Hartford Courant. CXXXIV (142) (Final ed.). May 22, 1971. p. 16. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  28. ^ University of Connecticut Board of Trustees (April 21, 1971). "Minutes, April 21, 1971" (PDF). University of Connecticut. pp. 4580–4581. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  29. ^ a b "2 Time men, Newsweek editor winners in 1972 Loeb Awards". The New York Times. May 12, 1972. p. 59. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  30. ^ a b "Wall Street host of public TV gets Loeb Award". Hartford Courant. CXXXVI (143) (daily ed.). United Press International. May 23, 1973. p. 56. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Winners selected for Loeb Awards". The New York Times. June 18, 1974. p. 58. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  32. ^ Rosenblatt, Robert A. (September 17, 1974). "'Amazing' Number of Frauds Still Exist, SEC Official Says". Los Angeles Times. XCIII (288). pp. Part III 7, 13. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  33. ^ Loomis, Carol J. (July 1973). "How the Terrible Two Tier Market Came to Wall Street" (PDF). Fortune. pp. 82–88, 186, 188–190. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  34. ^ a b "State reporter awarded Loeb". The Raleigh Register. 96 (80) (afternoon ed.). United Press International. September 24, 1975. p. 1. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ Loeb, Marshall (January 6, 1975). "FAISAL AND OIL Driving Toward a New World Order". Time. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  36. ^ a b "Gerald Loeb Awards given to top business journalists". Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph. July 25, 1976. p. 2-F. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  37. ^ "'77 Loeb winners named in business journalism". The New York Times. June 1, 1977. p. 74. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  38. ^ a b "Times' stories on dollar win '77 Loeb Award". Los Angeles Times. XCVII (164). May 16, 1978. p. 16 Part III. Retrieved February 28, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ Lapham, Lewis H. (August 1977). "The energy debacle". Harper's. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  40. ^ Tucker, William (December 1977). "Environmentalism and the leisure class". Harper's. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  41. ^ a b "Times Writer Shares Gerald Loeb Award". The New York Times. May 23, 1979. p. D5. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  42. ^ "Times awarded Loeb prize for energy stories". Los Angeles Times. XCIX (179). May 30, 1980. p. 2 Part IV. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ Tucker, William (November 1980). "The wreck of the auto industry". Harper's. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  44. ^ a b "2 finance writers for the Thimes win Loeb awards". Los Angeles Times. CI (131). April 13, 1982. p. 15 Part I. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ Eichenwald, Kurt (December 21, 1989). "2 Hunts Fined And Banned From Trades". New York Times. Retrieved April 13, 2008.
  46. ^ Davis, Lawrence J.; Dolce, Bill; Dolce, Steve (April 1981). "An American fortune". Harper's Magazine. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  47. ^ Davis, Lawrence J. (May 1981). "Silver Thursday". Harper's Magazine. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  48. ^ a b "Loeb citation for Times". The New York Times. June 29, 1983. p. D17. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  49. ^ Nocera, Joseph (October 1982). "It's Time To Make a Deal". Texas Monthly. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  50. ^ a b "Times writers Delugach, Soble get Loeb Award". Los Angeles Times. CIII (122). April 3, 1984. p. 2 Part IV. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ a b c d Starkman, Dean (2014). The Wathdog That Didn't Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 89. ISBN 978-0-231-53628-8.
  52. ^ "Auletta Wins Loeb Award". The New York Times. May 9, 1986. p. D9. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
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  54. ^ "Times writer wins Loeb Award". Los Angeles Times. CVII (159). May 10, 1988. p. 2 Part IV – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ a b c d "Globe's David Warsh is Loeb Award winner". Boston Globe. 235 (130). Associated Press. May 10, 1989. p. 78. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  56. ^ Schurenberg, Eric; Luciano, Lani (October 1, 1988). "The Empire Called AARP". Money. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  57. ^ Loomis, Carol J. (July 4, 1988). "Buyout Kings". Fortune. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  58. ^ a b Olson, Walter (September 1, 1990). "Award-Winning Journalism". Manhattan Institute. Retrieved February 5, 2019.
  59. ^ a b c Thomson, Susan (June 1991). "Loeb Winners Announced" (PDF). The Business Journalist. 30 (1). Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. p. 3. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  60. ^ a b Papiernik, Dick (June 1992). "Editors on the move in Philadelphia, Florida; award winners announced" (PDF). The Business Journalist. 31 (1). Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. pp. 3–4. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  61. ^ a b "2 Times Staffers Win Gerald Loeb Awards". Los Angeles Times. May 10, 1994. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  62. ^ "Government Investment Series Wins Loeb Award". Los Angeles Times. May 2, 1995. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  63. ^ "Globe reporter Butterfield wins Loeb award". The Boston Globe. 251 (127). May 7, 1997. p. D2. Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
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  65. ^ "The media bsuiness: reporting prizes are announced". The New York Times. May 26, 1999. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  66. ^ a b Lipinski, Lynn (May 23, 2000). "UCLA'S Anderson School Announces Winners of Loeb Competition and the Recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award". UCLA. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  67. ^ "Financial Journalists Chosen For 2001 Gerald Loeb Honors". The New York Times. June 1, 2001. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  68. ^ "Journal reporters win Loeb for Enron Coverage". The Wall Street Journal. June 26, 2002. p. B6.
  69. ^ a b c Henry, David; Byrnes, Nanette (2001). "The Numbers Game, Why Earnings Are Too Rosy" (PDF). UCLA Anderson School of Management. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  70. ^ a b "2003 Loeb Awards". UCLA Anderson School of Management. July 1, 2003. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  71. ^ a b c "2004 Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Archived from the original on August 26, 2012 – via Internet Archive.
  72. ^ a b "2005 Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Archived from the original on December 16, 2005. Retrieved May 22, 2010 – via Internet Archive.
  73. ^ a b Lowe, Mary Ann (June 27, 2006). "2006 Gerald Loeb Award Winners Announced by UCLA Anderson School of Management". UCLA. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  74. ^ a b "2007 Gerald Loeb Award Winners Announced by UCLA Anderson School of Management". Business Wire. June 25, 2007. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  75. ^ a b c d "2008 Gerald Loeb Award Winners Announced by UCLA Anderson School of Management". Fast Company. October 28, 2011. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  76. ^ "Loeb Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. June 29, 2009. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
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  83. ^ "UCLA Anderson School of Management Announces 2014 Gerald Loeb Award Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. June 24, 2014. Retrieved January 31, 2019.

External links[edit]