Getcha Back

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"Getcha Back"
Single by The Beach Boys
from the album The Beach Boys
B-side "Male Ego"
Released May 8, 1985
Format Vinyl
Genre Pop, doo wop
Length 2:59
Label Brother
Writer(s) Mike Love, Terry Melcher
Producer(s) Steve Levine
The Beach Boys singles chronology
"Come Go with Me"
"Getcha Back"
"It's Gettin' Late"

"Getcha Back" is a song written by Mike Love and Terry Melcher for the American rock band The Beach Boys, on their 1985 album The Beach Boys. It was the band's first release since the tragic drowning death of Dennis Wilson in 1983. The song peaked at number 26 nationally and number two on the Adult Contemporary chart.[1] "Getcha Back" recaptured the sound and feel of the Beach Boys' early hits.

Musically, the backing vocals resemble those from the 1959 hit "Hushabye" by The Mystics,[according to whom?] which the Beach Boys had covered in 1964 for their All Summer Long album. Comparisons could also be made[according to whom?] to Bruce Springsteen's 1980 hit "Hungry Heart", which Love later recorded a cover of for a tribute album.

Music video[edit]

The music video directed by Dominic Orlando, was filmed on location in Malibu and Venice, California. It featured a then-unknown Katherine Kelly Lang, who went on to play Brooke Logan on the soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful. Although the active members of the Beach Boys appear in the video, they do not play, sing, or lip-sync the song.[citation needed]


The Beach Boys
Additional musicians and production staff

Live versions[edit]

The song was played on the Beach Boys' The 50th Reunion Tour in 2012 with David Marks taking over on lead vocals and with Jeff Foskett on Brian Wilson's original falsetto part.[citation needed]

Cover versions[edit]

Mark McGrath, lead singer of the California rock band Sugar Ray, performed a cover of this song for the soundtrack of Herbie: Fully Loaded, a Walt Disney Pictures movie released in 2005. The Beach Boys version appears at the beginning, during the flashback of Herbie's racing career, during the opening credits.[citation needed]


  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 29.