Jimmy V Award

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Jimmy V Award
Awarded for "a deserving member of the sporting world who has overcome great obstacles through perseverance and determination."[1]
Location Microsoft Theater, Los Angeles (2017)
Presented by The V Foundation
First awarded 2007
Currently held by Jarrius Robertson (USA)
Website Official website

The Jimmy V Award (sometimes called the Jim Valvano Award for Perseverance) is awarded as part of the ESPY Awards to "a deserving member of the sporting world who has overcome great obstacles through perseverance and determination."[1] The award is named in honor of North Carolina State University men's basketball coach Jim Valvano, who gave an acceptance speech after receiving the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the 1993 ESPY Awards ceremony which "brought a howling, teary-eyed Madison Square Garden to its feet".[2] Valvano died from adenocarcinoma two months after receiving the award.[2] The Jimmy V Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan,[3] is presented at the annual awards ceremony in Los Angeles by The V Foundation, a charitable organization founded by ESPN and Valvano in 1993, involved in raising money to fund cancer research grants across the United States.[1]

The inaugural winner of the Jimmy V Award in 2007 was basketball coach Kay Yow, who successfully coached the North Carolina State University women's team to the ACC Tournament championship game, and the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Division I Tournament after returning from sessions of breast cancer chemotherapy.[4] Although the award has usually been given to coaches or athletes, it has been presented to two reporters: Stuart Scott (2014) and Craig Sager (2016).[5][6] The award has been shared on two occasions: Team Hoyt (2013), consisting of the father and son team of Dick and Rick Hoyt,[7] and the father and daughter combination of Devon Still and Leah Still (2015).[8] The 2017 recipient of the Jimmy V Award was Jarrius Robertson, a 15-year old "super fan" of the New Orleans Saints born with biliary atresia, which affects his rate of growth and has forced him to undergo two liver transplants and thirteen surgeries.[9]

Recipients[edit]

Year Image Recipient(s) Notes Ref
2007 Yow, KayKay Yow Returned to successfully coach the North Carolina State University women's team to the ACC Tournament championship game, and the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Division I Tournament after sessions of breast cancer chemotherapy. [4]
2008 Kevin Everett waving to the crowd in 2017 Everett, KevinKevin Everett Former Buffalo Bills tight end who was paralysed from the neck down due to a spinal cord injury he sustained at the start of the 2007 NFL season but began walking again after rehabilitation. [10]
2009 Meyer, DonDon Meyer Meyer had his left leg amputated below the knee after a vehicular accident in September 2008. He was later diagnosed with cancer of the liver and intestines, but eventually returned as coach of the Lipscomb Bisons men's basketball team. [11]
2010 George Kart coaching a basketball team in 2011 Karl, GeorgeGeorge Karl The Denver Nuggets coach returned to work after being placed on a leave of absence to undergo radiation treatment for neck and throat cancer for six weeks. [12]
2011 Robles, AnthonyAnthony Robles Robles, born without a right leg, beat Matt McDonough in the final of the 2010–2011 NCAA Division I Wrestling Championship 125 lb (57 kg) category to end the season undefeated. [13]
2012 Eric LeGrand in 2016 LeGrand, EricEric LeGrand After sustaining a spinal cord injury in a 2010 game against the Army Black Knights. the Rutgers Scarlet Knights American football defensive tackle contradicted medical opinion by standing upright with the aid of a metal frame, and breathing without the assistance of a ventilator. [14]
2013 Team Hoyt participating in a marathon in 2012 Hoyt, TeamTeam Hoyt Dick Hoyt pushed his son Rick, born with cerebral palsy, in a custom-built running wheelchair in more than a thousand long-distance running events for almost four decades. [7]
2014 Stuart Scott in 2010 Scott, StuartStuart Scott The ESPN sports commentator was diagnosed with appendiceal cancer in 2007, and continued to work for the network while undergoing multiple surgeries and chemotherapy. [5]
2015 Still, DevonDevon Still and Leah Still Five year-old Leah Still was diagnosed with stage four neuroblastoma, and her father, Devon, was added to the practice squad of the Cincinnati Bengals to help him afford his daughter's treatment. [8]
2016 Craig Sager in 2009 Sager, CraigCraig Sager TNT sports reporter diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in 2014, who kept working for the network in spite of his cancer no longer going into remission. [6]
2017 Robertson, JarriusJarrius Robertson 15-year old "super fan" of the New Orleans Saints, born with Biliary atresia, affecting his rate of growth, and forcing him to undergo two liver transplants and thirteen surgeries. [9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "V Foundation". ESPN. Archived from the original on December 18, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2018. 
  2. ^ a b Czachor, Emily Mae (July 13, 2017). "Celebrating 25 years, the ESPYs have become more than a sports awards show". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved January 21, 2018. 
  3. ^ Avard, Christian (August 2, 2013). "Sculptor commissioned to complete Joe Frazier statue has died". Barre Montpelier Times Argus. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2018. 
  4. ^ a b Auten, Taylor (July 19, 2007). "NC State's Yow wins Jimmy V award at ESPYs". College Sports Television. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  5. ^ a b Bethea, April (July 17, 2014). "Stuart Scott accepts Jimmy V Award at ESPYs". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  6. ^ a b Farber, Madeline (July 14, 2016). "Watch Sportscaster Craig Sager Deliver an Inspirational Speech at the ESPY Awards". Fortune. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  7. ^ a b Annear, Steve (July 18, 2013). "'Team Hoyt' Receives Recognition at the Annual ESPY Awards". Boston. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  8. ^ a b Gentille, Sean (July 15, 2015). "Devon Still gives powerhouse speech for daughter Leah at ESPYs". Sporting News. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  9. ^ a b Huff, Lauren (June 14, 2017). "ESPYs: Saints Super Fan Jarrius Robertson to Receive Jimmy V Perseverance Award". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 23, 2017. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  10. ^ Harris, Beth (July 20, 2008). "Tiger, NY Giants, Parker big winners at ESPYs". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Associated Press. p. D3. Retrieved January 19, 2018 – via InfoTrac Newsstand. (Subscription required (help)). 
  11. ^ "Former Hamline basketball coach earns ESPN honor". Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. July 20, 2009. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  12. ^ Brooks, Terry (July 15, 2010). "George Karl Receives Jimmy V Award at 2010 ESPYs". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on October 14, 2010. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  13. ^ Wilcox, Nate (July 14, 2011). "One-Legged Wrestling Champ Anthony Robles Takes Home ESPY Award". SB Nation. Archived from the original on September 3, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 
  14. ^ "Eric LeGrand to receive Valvano award at ESPYs". The Columbian. Associated Press. June 13, 2012. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018. 

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