Progressive Citizens' Party

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Progressive Citizens' Party
Fortschrittliche Bürgerpartei
Abbreviation FBP
Leader Thomas Banzer
Founded 1918
Headquarters Aeulestrasse 56
9490 Vaduz
Newspaper Liechtensteiner Volksblatt[1]
Youth wing Junge FBP
Ideology National conservatism[2]
Conservatism[3]
Economic liberalism
Monarchism
Euroscepticism
Classical liberalism
Political position Right-wing
European affiliation European Democrat Union[4]
Colours Blue
Seats in Landtag
9 / 25
Website
www.fbp.li

The Progressive Citizens' Party (German: Fortschrittliche Bürgerpartei, FBP) is a national-conservative[2] political party in Liechtenstein. The FBP is one of the two major political parties in Liechtenstein, along with the Christian-democratic Patriotic Union. Founded in 1918 along with the now-defunct Christian-Social People's Party, it is the oldest extant party in Liechtenstein.[5]

History[edit]

The party was established in 1918 by middle class citizens and members of the agricultural community as a response to the formation of the Christian-Social People's Party (VP).[6] It won the majority of the elected seats in the 1918 elections,[7] but the VP formed a government.[8]

The VP won elections in 1922, January 1926 and April 1926, but the FBP won the 1928 elections, and became the party of government until 1938,[8] with Josef Hoop serving as Prime Minister until 1945. In 1938 the FBP allowed the Patriotic Union to join it in a coalition government. The two parties governed in coalition until the 1997 elections,[9] after which the Patriotic Union formed a government. The FBP won the 2001 elections and its leader Otmar Hasler became Prime Minister. Following the 2005 elections the coalition was renewed,[9] with Hasler remaining Prime Minister. The VU's Klaus Tschütscher held the post between 2009 and 2013, after which FBP leader Adrian Hasler became Prime Minister.

Electoral results[edit]

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
1918
7 / 12
Increase 7 Increase 1st Majority
1922
4 / 15
Decrease 3 Decrease 2nd Opposition
1926 (Jan)
6 / 15
Increase 2 Steady 2nd Opposition
1926 (Apr)
6 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Opposition
1928
11 / 15
Increase 5 Increase 1st Majority
1930
15 / 15
Increase 4 Steady 1st Majority
1932
13 / 15
Decrease 2 Steady 1st Majority
1936
11 / 15
Decrease 2 Steady 1st Majority
1939
8 / 15
Decrease 11 Steady 1st Coalition
1945 1,553 54.9
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1949 1,555 52.9
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1953 (Feb) 1,458 50.5
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1953 (Jun) 1,568 50.4
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1957 1,689 52.3
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1958 1,839 54.5
9 / 15
Increase 1 Steady 1st Coalition
1962 1,599 47.2
8 / 15
Decrease 1 Steady 1st Coalition
1966 1,791 48.5
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1970 1,978 48.8
7 / 15
Decrease 1 Decrease 2nd Coalition
1974 17,332 50.1
8 / 15
Increase 1 Increase 1st Coalition
1978 18,872 50.8
7 / 15
Decrease 1 Decrease 2nd Coalition
1982 18,273 46.5
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1986 39,853 42.7
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1989 67,382 42.1
12 / 25
Increase 5 Steady 2nd Coalition
1993 (Feb) 71,209 44.2
12 / 25
Steady 0 Increase 1st Coalition
1993 (Oct) 65,075 41.3
11 / 25
Decrease 1 Decrease 2nd Coalition
1997 65,914 39.2
10 / 25
Decrease 1 Steady 2nd Opposition
2001 92,204 49.9
13 / 25
Increase 3 Increase 1st Majority
2005 94,547 48.7
12 / 25
Decrease 1 Steady 1st Coalition
2009 86,951 43.5
11 / 25
Decrease 1 Decrease 2nd Coalition
2013 77,644 40.0
10 / 25
Decrease 1 Increase 1st Coalition
2017 68,673 35.2
9 / 25
Decrease 1 Steady 1st Coalition

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Fortschrittliche Bürgerpartei". e-archiv.li (in German). Liechtenstein National Archives. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Stefanini, Sara (5 February 2017). "Liechtenstein's Populists Gain Ground". Politico. Retrieved 5 February 2017. 
  3. ^ Nordsieck, Wolfram (2017). "Liechtenstein". Parties and Elections in Europe. Retrieved 22 May 2018. 
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  5. ^ "History". Fürstentum Liechtenstein. Government of Liechtenstein Marketing. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 13 February 2014. 
  6. ^ Vincent E McHale (1983) Political parties of Europe, Greenwood Press, p609 ISBN 0-313-23804-9
  7. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1182 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  8. ^ a b McHale, p611
  9. ^ a b Nohlen & Stöver, p1157

External links[edit]