Long Island-class escort carrier

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USS Long Island (CVE-1)
USS Long Island (CVE-1) transporting a deck-load of aircraft.
Class overview
Name: Long Island-class escort carrier
Operators: United States United States Navy
Preceded by: N/A
Succeeded by: Bogue-class escort carrier
Completed: 2
Retired: 2
Scrapped: 2
General characteristics
Type: Escort carrier
Length:
  • 404 ft 2.4 in (123.200 m) (length of flight deck)[1]
  • 492 ft (150 m) (length overall)
Beam: 69.9 ft (21.3 m)
Draft: 25 ft 2 in (7.67 m)
Installed power: 8,500 hp (6,300 kW)[2]
Propulsion:
Speed: 16.5 kn (19.0 mph; 30.6 km/h)
Range: 10,000 nmi (12,000 mi; 19,000 km) at 14 kn (16 mph; 26 km/h)[3]
Complement: 856[4]
Aircraft carried:
  • Hangar Capacity: 16
  • Flight Deck Storage: 46
Aviation facilities: 1 × elevator

The Long Island-class escort carrier was a two-ship class, originally listed as "AVG" (Aircraft Escort Vessels). They were converted from type C3-class merchant ships.

The first ship of the class—USS Long Island, originally AVG-1, later ACV-1 then CVE-1—was launched on 11 January 1940, and served in the United States Navy through World War II.

The second and last ship of the class—HMS Archer (D78)—was launched on 14 December 1939, and served in the Royal Navy through World War II. It is also listed in U.S. Navy records as BAVG-1; the "B" presumably stood for "British".[5][6][7] [8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ford, Roger (2001) The Encyclopedia of Ships, pg. 392. Amber Books, London. ISBN 978-1-905704-43-9
  2. ^ Ford, Roger (2001) The Encyclopedia of Ships, pg. 392. Amber Books, London. ISBN 978-1-905704-43-9
  3. ^ Ford, Roger (2001) The Encyclopedia of Ships, pg. 392. Amber Books, London. ISBN 978-1-905704-43-9
  4. ^ Ford, Roger (2001) The Encyclopedia of Ships, pg. 392. Amber Books, London. ISBN 978-1-905704-43-9
  5. ^ "Moore-McCormack, Mormacland". Moore-McCormack. Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  6. ^ "A history of HMS Archer". Royal Navy Research Archive. Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  7. ^ Mitchell, W H, and Sawyer, L A (1995). The Empire Ships. London, New York, Hamburg, Hong Kong: Lloyd's of London Press Ltd. p. 425. ISBN 1-85044-275-4. 
  8. ^ "Sun Shipbuilding, Chester PA". Ship Building History. Retrieved 1 October 2010. 
  • The Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet, James C. Fahey, Associate, United States Naval Institute, Victory Edition, copyright 1945, published by Ships and Aircraft, 1265 Broadway, NY 1, NY.
  • Ford, Roger; Gibbons, Tony; Hewson, Rob; Jackson, Bob; Ross, David (2001). The Encyclopedia of Ships. London: Amber Books, Ltd. p. 392. ISBN 978-1-905704-43-9. 
  • This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.
  • Friedman, Norman (1983). U.S. Aircraft Carriers. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-739-9. 
  • Morison, Samuel Eliot (2010). The Struggle for Guadalcanal: August 1942 – February 1943. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-59114-551-6. 
  • Silverstone, Paul H. (1968). U.S. Warships of World War II. Doubleday & Company. 
Bibliography
  • Cocker, Maurice (2008). Aircraft-Carrying Ships of the Royal Navy. Stroud, Gloucestershire: The History Press. ISBN 978-0-7524-4633-2. 
  • Tillman, Barrett (1998). SBD Dauntless Units of World War 2, Issue 10 of Osprey Combat Aircraft. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-85532-732-0. 
  • Poolman, Kenneth (1972). Escort Carrier 1941–1945. London: Ian Allen. ISBN 0-7110-0273-8.