Neil Parrott

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Neil C. Parrott
Neil Parrott.jpg
Member of the Maryland House of Delegates from District 2A
In office
January 12, 2011 – present
Preceded by Christopher Shank
Personal details
Born (1970-07-30) July 30, 1970 (age 45)
Bethesda, Maryland
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) April Parrott
Children three children
Residence Hagerstown, Maryland
Occupation traffic engineer
Religion Christian

Neil C. Parrott (born July 30, 1970) is an American politician who represents District 2A in the Maryland House of Delegates.


Born and raised in Maryland, Parrott graduated from Old Mill High School in 1988. He went on to the University of Maryland at College Park where he graduated with a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering in 1994; he subsequently obtained his Professional Engineers License in 2000. He later attended graduate school and in 2006 graduated from Mount Saint Mary's University with an MBA.

Parrott began his career at the Maryland State Highway Administration where he concentrated on traffic engineering. He went on from there to become the Deputy Director of Public Works for the City of Frederick. After that, Mr. Parrott began working full time at Traffic Solutions Incorporated (TRSI), a traffic engineering firm he founded.

In the legislature[edit]

Parrott was sworn in as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates in January, 2011. He was assigned to the House Judiciary Committee.[1] Due to the State's legislative redistricting passed in 2012, but not taking effect until after the 2014 General Elections, District 2B and District 2A were combined to create one district. This created a two-at-large member district, District 2A. After winning re-election in his new district in 2014, Parrott continued to serve on the House Judiciary Committee.

Ballot initiatives[edit]

In 2012, Parrott founded an organization,, to coordinate petitioning laws he opposes to be placed on ballot initiatives.[2] That year, his organization was successful in putting three laws on the ballot—marriage equality for gay and lesbian couples, in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants, and a proposed Congressional redistricting map—but all three were upheld by Maryland voters.[2] Two later petition attempts by the organization—a 2013 bill abolishing the death penalty in Maryland, and a 2014 bill ensuring employment and housing protections for transgender Marylanders—fell short of the threshold to get on the ballot.[3][4]

Electoral results[edit]

  • 2010 General Election for Maryland House Of Delegates – District 2B[5]
Voters to choose one:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Neil C. Parrott, Rep. 7,663   61.78%    Won
Brien J. Poffenberger 4,718   38.04%    Lost
Other Write-Ins 22 0.18% Lost
  • 2014 Primary Race for Maryland House of Delegates - District 2A[6]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Neil Parrott 5,362   45.8%     Won
Andrew Serafini 5,178   44.2%     Won
David Hanlin 1,180   10.1%     Lost
  • 2014 General Election for Maryland House of Delegates - District 2A[7]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Neil Parrott 17,599    36.0%     Won
Andrew Serafini 17,528    35.9%     Won
Elizabeth Paul 8,279    16.9%     Lost
Charles Bailey 5,419    11.1%     Lost
Other Write-Ins 22 0.0% Lost


  1. ^ "Neil C. Parrott, Maryland State Delegate". Maryland State Government. 
  2. ^ a b Basu, Kaustuv (7 May 2014). "Neil Parrott says his greatest responsibility is to serve and help people". Hagerstown Herald-Mail. 
  3. ^ Wagner, John (31 May 2013). "Petition drive to halt Maryland’s death penalty repeal falls short". The Washington Post. 
  4. ^ Lavers, Michael (1 June 2014). "Efforts to force referendum on Md. trans rights law fail". The Washington Blade. 
  5. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Official 2014 Gubernatorial Primary Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections. 2014-07-16. Retrieved 2015-01-09. 
  7. ^ "Official 2014 Gubernatorial General Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections. 12/02/2014. Retrieved January 9, 2015.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links[edit]