Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors

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Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors
Otogi 2 - Immortal Warriors Coverart.png
Developer(s) FromSoftware
Publisher(s) Sega
  • JP: FromSoftware
Producer(s) Masanori Takeuchi
Artist(s) Keiichiro Ogawa
Composer(s) Yuki Ichiki
Platform(s) Xbox
Release
  • JP: December 25, 2003
  • NA: October 21, 2004
  • EU: February 11, 2005
Genre(s) Hack and slash, Action
Mode(s) Single-player

Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors, known in Japan as Otogi: Hyakki Toubatsu Emaki (O・TO・GI 〜百鬼討伐絵巻〜), is a hack and slash action game developed by FromSoftware and published by Sega. Otogi 2 is the sequel to Otogi: Myth of Demons.

Gameplay[edit]

Plot[edit]

Players assumed the role of Raikoh Minamoto, the undead warrior charged with the task of vanquishing the demonic infestation that plagued Japan's sacred capital. Continuing where the original left off, Otogi 2 puts players in the role of Raikoh, who is summoned once again to destroy the invading demons. This time however, he's not alone, and with the help of some new allies, Raikoh and his loyal followers will set out to destroy the demons once and for all and prevent darkness from consuming the world.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
Aggregator Score
Metacritic 79/100[1]
Review scores
Publication Score
Edge 8/10[2]
EGM 8.67/10[3]
Famitsu 30/40[4]
Game Informer 7/10[5]
GamePro 3/5 stars[6]
Game Revolution C+[7]
GameSpot 8.3/10[8]
GameSpy 3.5/5 stars[9]
GameZone 8.8/10[10]
IGN 8.4/10[11]
OXM (US) 8.9/10[12]
The Sydney Morning Herald 3.5/5 stars[13]

Otogi 2 received "favorable" reviews (although slightly less than the original Otogi) according to video game review aggregator Metacritic.[1] In Japan, Famitsu gave it a score of one seven, two eights, and one seven, for a total of 30 out of 40.[4]

The game sold poorly, however. Responding to a letter questioning why Electronic Gaming Monthly ran such a short review on Otogi 2,[3] Dan Hsu, editor-in-chief of the publication, stated, "As good of a game Otogi 2 is, we still have to acknowledge that relatively few people want to read about it."[14] The game is not compatible with the Xbox 360.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors for Xbox Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  2. ^ Edge staff (March 2004). "Otogi: Hyakki Toubatsu Emaki". Edge (134): 104. 
  3. ^ a b EGM staff (December 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors". Electronic Gaming Monthly (185): 164. 
  4. ^ a b "O・TO・GI 〜百鬼討伐絵巻〜". Famitsu. 785. January 1, 2004. 
  5. ^ Miller, Matt (October 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors". Game Informer (138): 140. Archived from the original on February 29, 2008. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  6. ^ Bionic Bigfoot (November 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors Review for Xbox on GamePro.com". GamePro: 108. Archived from the original on March 6, 2005. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  7. ^ Dodson, Joe (October 26, 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors Review". Game Revolution. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  8. ^ Kasavin, Greg (October 19, 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors Review". GameSpot. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  9. ^ Vassar, Darryl (October 20, 2004). "GameSpy: Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors". GameSpy. Archived from the original on December 1, 2005. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  10. ^ Berner, Matt (October 26, 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors - XB - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on February 27, 2008. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  11. ^ Goldstein, Hilary (October 14, 2004). "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors". IGN. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Otogi 2: Immortal Warriors". Official Xbox Magazine: 82. November 2004. 
  13. ^ Ring, Bennett (March 5, 2005). "Guns 'n' poses". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  14. ^ Hsu, Dan (January 2005). "Letters". Electronic Gaming Monthly (187): 20. 

External links[edit]