P.O.S (rapper)

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P.O.S
P.O.S performing in 2009
P.O.S performing in 2009
Background information
Birth nameStefon Leron Alexander[1]
Also known as
  • P.O.S.
  • Emily Bloodmobile
  • LeRon
Born (1981-08-18) August 18, 1981 (age 39)[2]
Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Rapper
  • multi-instrumentalist
  • singer
  • record producer
Instruments
  • Sampler
  • guitar
  • bass guitar
  • keyboards
  • drums
Years active2001–present
Labels
Associated acts
Websitewww.doomtree.net/pos/

Stefon Leron Alexander[1] (born August 18, 1981),[2] better known by his stage name P.O.S, is an American hip hop artist from Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has been a member of the groups such as Doomtree,[3] Building Better Bombs,[3] Gayngs,[3] Marijuana Deathsquads,[3] Cenospecies,[4] Four Fists,[5] and Shredders.[5]

Early life[edit]

P.O.S was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[6] He attended Hopkins High School.[7]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Before entering hip hop, P.O.S was in the punk rock bands named Degenerates and Om.[8]

In 2001, P.O.S, rapper Syst, and DJ Anomaly formed a short-lived hip hop group Cenospecies.[4] The group released a studio album, Indefinition, in 2002.[4] The group won the award for "Best Band to Break Up in the Past 12 Months" in the year-end issue of City Pages.[4]

Doomtree[edit]

In 2001, P.O.S and MK Larada formed a hip hop collective Doomtree.[9] The group has released three studio albums: Doomtree (2008),[10] No Kings (2011),[11] and All Hands (2015).[12]

Solo[edit]

P.O.S released his debut solo studio album, Ipecac Neat, on Doomtree Records in 2004.[13] His second studio album, Audition, was released on Rhymesayers Entertainment in 2006.[14]

In 2009, P.O.S released his third studio album, Never Better, on Rhymesayers Entertainment.[15] It peaked at number 106 on the Billboard 200 chart.[16]

His fourth studio album, We Don't Even Live Here, was released on Rhymesayers Entertainment in 2012.[17] It peaked at number 47 on the Billboard 200 chart.[18] A version of the album remixed by Marijuana Deathsquads, titled WDELH/MDS/RMX, was released a year later.[19]

In 2017, P.O.S released his fifth studio album, Chill, Dummy, on Doomtree Records.[20]

Side projects[edit]

P.O.S is a vocalist and guitarist in the punk band Building Better Bombs.[21] The group released a studio album, Freak Out Squares, on Init Records in 2007.[21]

He is a member of Minneapolis indie supergroup Gayngs.[22] The group's first studio album, Relayted, was released on Jagjaguwar in 2010.[22]

Marijuana Deathsquads was formed after Building Better Bombs went on hiatus.[23] Consisting of rotating members, the group released the first studio album, Crazy Master, in 2011.[24]

P.O.S is also a member of hardcore punk band Wharf Rats along with Chris 2, Chachi Darin, and Wade MacNeil.[25]

He is one half of Four Fists along with Astronautalis.[26] The duo's first studio album, titled 6666, was released in 2018.[26]

He is a member of Shredders along with Sims, Lazerbeak, and Paper Tiger.[27] The group has released two studio albums: Dangerous Jumps (2017)[27] and Great Hits (2019).[27]

Style and influences[edit]

In a 2010 interview with Punknews.org, P.O.S listed Minor Threat, Operation Ivy, Black Flag, Rancid, Metallica, and Michael Jackson as some of the first musicians he loved.[28] Hip hop-wise, he cited Mos Def, Company Flow, Atmosphere, and Aesop Rock as important influences.[28]

Personal life[edit]

In 2012, P.O.S had to cancel his national tour due to health concerns.[29] In a video posted to YouTube, P.O.S said failing kidneys are to blame for the cancellation, saying, "everyone keeps telling me, including my doctors, that I have to take care of my health first."[30] In 2014, he received a kidney transplant.[31]

Controversies[edit]

In June 2020 P.O.S released a statement regarding allegations of sexual assault and abuse by his touring DJ. In response to this, multiple women came forward accusing P.O.S himself of a history of manipulation and emotional abuse.[32] In July 2020 P.O.S responded to these allegations and announced that he was stepping away from music.[33]

Recognition[edit]

P.O.S's star on the outside mural of the Minneapolis nightclub First Avenue

P.O.S has been honored with two stars on the outside mural of the Minneapolis nightclub First Avenue,[34] recognizing performers that have played sold-out shows or have otherwise demonstrated a major contribution to the culture at the venue.[35] P.O.S has one star for his solo work, and the Doomtree collective also has one.[34]

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Remix albums[edit]

  • WDELH/MDS/RMX (2013)

EPs[edit]

  • Falsehopes (2002) (with Cecil Otter)
  • False Hopes Mega! (2003) (with Cecil Otter)
  • This Is a Gang. All We Need Is a Name (2006) (with Ryan Olson, et al., as Building Better Bombs)
  • Wharf Rats (2011) (with Chris 2, Wade MacNeil, and Chachi Darin, as Wharf Rats)

Singles[edit]

  • "Half Cocked Concepts" (2005)
  • "Bleeding Hearts Club" (2006)
  • "P.O.S Is Ruining My Life" (2006)
  • "Goodbye" (2009)
  • "Drumroll (We're All Thirsty)" (2009)
  • "Optimist (We Are Not for Them)" (2009)
  • "Purexed" (2009)
  • "Crack a Window" (2011) (with Big Cats!; split 7" with William Elliott Whitmore)
  • "Bumper" (2012)
  • "Fuck Your Stuff" (2012)
  • "Sleepdrone/Superposition" (2016)
  • "Wave" (2016)
  • "Wearing a Bear" (2016)
  • "Woof" (2016)
  • "Lanes" (2016)

Guest appearances[edit]

  • Heiruspecs – "Commonwealth" from Small Steps (2002)
  • Negative One – "Pressure" from Less Is More (2004)
  • Mel Gibson and the Pants – "Shark Sandwich" from A Mannequin American (2004)
  • Ernie Rhodes – "Solid" from The Orbital Effect (2005)
  • Sims – "No Homeowners" from Lights Out Paris (2005)
  • Mel Gibson and the Pants – "Collars Popped and Loaded" from W/ Guitar (2005)
  • Word for Word – "Elevata Music" from Twin Cites or Bust (2006)
  • The Awesome Snakes – "P.O.S. vs. Awesome Snakes" from Venom (2006)
  • Minus the Bear – "Drilling (P.O.S Redo)" from Interpretaciones del Oso (2007)
  • Astronautalis – "The Story of My Life" from Pomegranate (2008)
  • The Gigantics – "Mr. Anaya" from Die Already (2008)
  • Mike Mictlan & Lazerbeak – "Shux" from Hand Over Fist (2008)
  • Cecil Otter – "Traveling Dunktank" from Rebel Yellow (2008)
  • BK-One with Benzilla – "A Day's Work" from Radio Do Canibal (2009)
  • The Returners – "I Promise" from Break Up Your Make Up (2009)
  • Prof & St. Paul Slim – "Broadcasting" from Recession Music (2009)
  • Approach – "Leads (Hard to Find)" from SweetKnuckleJunction (Season 1) (2010)
  • The Let Go – "Nightfall" from Morning Comes (2010)
  • Grieves – "War for the Crippled" from The Confessions of Mr. Modest (2010)
  • Kristoff Krane – "Don't Mean a Thing" from Picking Flowers Next to Roadkill (2010)
  • B. Dolan – "Fall of T.R.O.Y." from Fallen House, Sunken City (2010)
  • Dark Time Sunshine – "Primor" from Vessel (2010)
  • Dez & Nobs – "Underbelly" from Rocky Dennis (2010)
  • Gayngs – "No Sweat" from Relayted (2010)
  • Muja Messiah – "Dear God" from M-16's (2010)
  • Mod Sun – "Keep It Movin'" from The Hippy Hop EP (2010)
  • Sims – "Too Much" from Bad Time Zoo (2011)
  • Open Mike Eagle – "Why Pianos Break" from Rappers Will Die of Natural Causes (2011)
  • Astronautalis – "This Is Our Science" from This Is Our Science (2011)
  • K. – "No Goons" from Raphood & Authenticity (Blackened Reissue) (2011)
  • Scroobius Pip – "Let 'Em Come" from Distraction Pieces (2011)
  • Spyder Baybie Rawdog and 2% Muck – "Knockin' at Your Door" and "Let Me Know" from Now That's What I Call Raw Vol. 2: Poornigraphy (2011)
  • Dark Time Sunshine – "Overlordian" from Anx (2012)
  • Mike Mictlan – "Syke!" and "Let Me Know" from Snaxxx (2012)
  • Showyousuck – "Hotline Miami" from Dude Bro (2013)
  • Busdriver – "Go Hard or Go Homogenous" from Perfect Hair deluxe edition (2014)
  • Toki Wright & Big Cats! – "Heal" from Pangaea (2014)
  • Koo Koo Kanga Roo – "Shake It Well" from Whoopty Whoop (2014)
  • Play Date – "Ninja Pajamas" from We All Shine (2015)
  • Sean Anonymous + Dimitry Killstorm – "Big Bang" from Better Days (2015)
  • Cavanaugh – "Typecast" from Time and Materials (2015)
  • Greg Grease – "On a Limb" from Born to Lurk, Forced to Work (2015)
  • Onry Ozzborn – "Turmoil" from Duo (2016)
  • Red Pill – "Fuck Your Ambition" from Instinctive Drowning (2016)
  • Sadistik – "Molecules" from Altars (2017)
  • YYY – "Here Today" from A Tribute to the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds (2017)
  • Joey Van Phillips – "Broken Arrow" from Punch Bowl (2017)
  • Cas One vs. Figure – "Never Stop Running" from So Our Egos Don't Kill Us (2017)
  • Ultra Suede – "What It Is" from Ultra Suede (2018)
  • Transit22 – "Against the Wind" from Dark Day // Good Morning (2019)
  • Infidelix – "Six Days Six Nights" from #ripme (2019)
  • Dwynell Roland – "Motions" from Weird Captions (2019)
  • Ceschi – "Incesticide" from Sans Soleil (2019)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Eyl, Eryc (November 16, 2006). "P.O.S." Westword. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  2. ^ a b Brown, Marisa. "P.O.S: Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d Horgen, Tom (October 19, 2012). "Vita.mn's 5 most influential 2006-2011: P.O.S." Star Tribune. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d "Best Band to Break Up in the Past 12 Months: Minneapolis 2002 - Cenospecies". City Pages. Archived from the original on March 25, 2014. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Calder, Simon (September 15, 2017). "Back to the City Video Podcast: P.O.S discusses Shredders and 2 other new projects". City Pages. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  6. ^ Hoffberger, Chase (March 20, 2009). "POS". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  7. ^ Bahn, Christopher (March 21, 2006). "Interview: P.O.S. of Doomtree". The A.V. Club. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  8. ^ Harris, Josef (September 18, 2013). "P.O.S. of Doomtree". Urban Bean Coffee. Archived from the original on September 26, 2015. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  9. ^ Abney, Barb (December 5, 2014). "Artist of the Month: Doomtree". The Current. Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  10. ^ Westhoff, Ben (August 29, 2008). "Doomtree: Doomtree". Pitchfork. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  11. ^ Patrin, Nate (November 28, 2011). "Doomtree: No Kings". Pitchfork. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  12. ^ Patrin, Nate (January 27, 2015). "Doomtree: All Hands". Pitchfork. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  13. ^ Spencer, Jack (March 18, 2014). "P.O.S.'s Ipecac Neat is 10 years old". City Pages. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  14. ^ Faklis, Tim (September 28, 2016). "P.O.S revisits 'Audition' track-by-track as the album turns 10". City Pages. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  15. ^ Patrin, Nate (February 4, 2009). "P.O.S: Never Better". Pitchfork. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  16. ^ "Billboard 200: The week of February 21, 2009". Billboard. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  17. ^ Adams, Gregory (August 15, 2012). "P.O.S. Ropes In Bon Iver, Boys Noize, Gayngs for 'We Don't Even Live Here'". Exclaim!. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  18. ^ "Billboard 200: The week of November 10, 2012". Billboard. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  19. ^ Geslani, Michelle (October 23, 2013). "Stream: P.O.S.'s We Don't Even Live Here remixed by Marijuana Deathsquads". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  20. ^ Boller, Jay (December 13, 2016). "P.O.S spills details about new solo album 'Chill, Dummy'". City Pages. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  21. ^ a b McPherson, Steve (May 23, 2007). "Building Better Bombs Get Heavy". City Pages. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  22. ^ a b Lester, Paul (March 30, 2010). "Gayngs (No 757)". The Guardian. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  23. ^ Lunney, Tigger (March 9, 2011). "Marijuana Deathsquads raid the West Coast". City Pages. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  24. ^ Gage, Jeff (November 4, 2011). "Marijuana Deathsquads release Crazy Master tonight at Nick and Eddie". City Pages. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  25. ^ Riemenschneider, Chris; Horgen, Tom (August 17, 2012). "The Crawl: Who will Rock the Garden?". Star Tribune. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  26. ^ a b Madden, Michael (October 10, 2018). "As Four Fists, P.O.S and Astronautalis combine rap skill and punk spirit on '6666'". City Pages. Retrieved February 16, 2020.
  27. ^ a b c Eustice, Kyle (August 29, 2019). "Shredders Deliver "Great Hits" Project". HipHopDX. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  28. ^ a b Verducci, Richard (August 26, 2010). "P.O.S." Punknews.org. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  29. ^ Thompson, Erik (October 19, 2012). "P.O.S. cancels U.S. tour due to health concerns, is in need of kidney transplant". City Pages. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  30. ^ Swensson, Andrea (October 19, 2012). "P.O.S. cancels tour to undergo treatment for kidney disease". The Current. Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  31. ^ Gabler, Jay (March 11, 2014). "P.O.S. kidney transplant: Success!". The Current. Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  32. ^ Sacher, Andrew (June 27, 2020). "Doomtree respond to allegations against P.O.S: "the stories you're reading... at least some of them are true"". BrooklynVegan. Retrieved January 29, 2021.
  33. ^ "From P.O.S". Doomtree.net. July 16, 2020. Retrieved January 29, 2021.
  34. ^ a b Brennan, Caleb (May 11, 2020). "How many Minnesotans have First Avenue stars?". The Current. Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  35. ^ Bream, Jon (May 3, 2019). "10 things you'll learn about First Avenue in new Minnesota History Center show". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 24, 2020.

External links[edit]