Porsche 982

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Porsche 982
2018 Porsche 718 Boxster S S-A 2.5 Front.jpg
Overview
Also calledPorsche 718 Boxster
Porsche 718 Cayman
Production2016–present
DesignerPeter Varga (2015)[1]
Body and chassis
Body style
Powertrain
Engine2.0 L turbocharged flat-4
2.5 L turbocharged flat-4
Transmission7-speed PDK
6-speed manual
Dimensions
WheelbaseBoxster: 2,475 mm (97.4 in)
Cayman: 2,475 mm (97.4 in)
LengthBoxster: 4,379 mm (172.4 in)
Cayman: 4,379 mm (172 in)
WidthBoxster: 1,801 mm (70.9 in)
Cayman: 1,801 mm (70.9 in)
HeightBoxster: 1,281 mm (50.4 in)
Cayman: 1,295 mm (51 in)
Curb weightBoxster/Cayman:
2,944 lb (1,335 kg) (manual), 3,010 lb (1,370 kg) (PDK)[2][3]

Boxster S/Cayman S:
2,988 lb (1,355 kg) (manual), 3,054 lb (1,385 kg) (PDK)[4][5]

Boxster GTS/Cayman GTS:
1,375 kg (3,031 lb) (manual), 1,405 kg (3,097 lb) (PDK)[6][7]
Chronology
PredecessorPorsche 981

The Porsche 982 is the internal designation of the fourth generation Boxster/Cayman made by Porsche. With the switch to a new turbocharged flat-four engine the marketing name for the models was changed to Porsche 718, in reference to the Porsche 718, which won the Targa Florio race in 1959 and 1960. The name is meant to evoke Porsche's past racing successes with light cars like the 718 that outmanoeuvred competitors with larger and more powerful engines.[8][9] Also the new Porsche 718 has a rear mid-mounted flat-four engine with four camshafts, like its original namesake.

Models[edit]

The 718 Boxster was introduced in January 2016, and premiered at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show. The 718 Cayman joined the range in April at the Beijing Motor Show. The 718 featured two new horizontally-opposed flat-4 turbocharged engines at 2.0L (Boxster/Cayman) and 2.5L (Boxster S/Cayman S) displacement with increased torque and horsepower with lower fuel consumption. The S model turbocharger utilizes Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG) technology.[10][11]

Later in October 2017, the GTS models were announced with their 2.5 liter engines upgraded to produce 361 bhp (269 kW; 366 PS). The Boxster could reach 60 mph (97 km/h) from a standstill in 4.1 seconds, and the Cayman in 3.9 seconds.[12]

Styling[edit]

The exterior of the 718 Boxster and Cayman is very similar to the third generation, more of an evolution than a redesign. The most notable changes are to the rear of the car, which now has a long black-trim bar across the rear connecting the two taillights. The headlights and bumper are also heavily reworked. On the sides, the mirrors have been redesigned, taking hue from the SportDesign mirrors on the GT3.

The interior remains very similar to the 981 Cayman / Boxster and the 991.2 generation of the Porsche 911. The main change is the new PCM 4.0 infotainment system, which replaces the PCM 3.1.[13] The steering wheel comes with a mode selector switch that includes a selection of Sports and Sports Plus driving modes, resulting in snappier throttle response at the cost of fuel efficiency. Overall, the most prominent design features of the 981 Cayman / Boxster remain, including large air induction ports on the side, and the prominent horizontal aluminum piece used for adding oil and coolant in the trunk.[14]

Reviews[edit]

Despite the loss of two cylinders, the 718 Cayman / Boxster was assessed to be mechanically superior to the 981 model with improved acceleration and steering, while the new 4 cylinder engine "cheapens the experience".[15] The 718 Cayman was declared Motor Trend's 2nd best Drivers car in 2017, which praised the car's handling and throttle response. Giving the award, Miguel Cortina noted, "The suspension is just what you want to feel in a car like this—stiff, sporty, rigid. You get a very good sense of what is happening on the road."[16]

By far, the most contentious reaction to the 718 Cayman was the sound of the engine - which received nearly universal criticism by the automotive press. Car and Driver called it a, "raspy, uncouth sound that strikes some drivers as unpleasant and grating."[17] Top Gear noted that the sound, "fundamentally cheapens the Porsche experience," and make the car, "less upmarket, less cultured and sophisticated than it did before."[18] However, Motor Trend's Ignition tested the 718 Cayman against the 981 Cayman GT4, and found that the performance gains were so strong the car had the capability to outmanoeuvre the GT4 at a much lower price. They concluded that the tradeoff was probably worth it.[19]

The updated cockpit of the 718 has the 4th generation of the Porsche PCM system, indicated by the display without bezels. This model has multifunction steering wheel controls.

The 718 GTS variant of the Cayman and Boxster was released to generally positive reviews. Visually, the front headlight and rear taillights were smokey black, and an aggressive front sports fascia was added. Performance upgrades included Porsche Sports Exhaust, a Sports Chrono Package, Porsche Stability Management were all added as standard features. By expanding the air intake, the 718 GTS has an additional 15 horsepower and even more torque than the 718 S. In addition, carmine red was added as a color as a $2580 option. Used in most of Porsche advertising with the GTS, the color is darker than Porsche Guards Red, and very similar to the Italian racing color used by Ferrari, Rosso Corsa.[20]

Many reviewers, including New York Times contributor Tom Voelk, noted that the 718 GTS had a much more pleasing sound than the base 718 and the 718 S. “One of the biggest complaints of the 718 is that its turbo 4 engine doesn’t have the distinctive sound that the outgoing 6 cylinder had,” said Voelk. “But the 718 GTS sounds much better. It has different intakes and a larger turbo.” The sound of the 718 GTS engine has much more prominent bass frequencies, which contrast with a strong treble pitch of the turbocharger.[21]

However, Evo magazine argues that, while "capable of challenging the 911 as a true sports car", the "718 version of the GTS doesn't really achieve anything more than the Cayman GTS it replaces" and "with its more desirable engine, it's the previous model that feels more exotic and like a much higher quality product." It describes the GTS' engine as "a nasty sounding motor", the noise from the turbo four-cylinder in the cabin as "dreadful" and "tuneless drivel" and contests that "the only redeeming feature of the 718 GTS sonically is that this is probably the quietest iteration of this motor".[22]

Specifications[edit]

Year Engine Power Torque Transmission (gears) 0–100 km/h (60 mph) Top speed CO
2
2016 2.0L (1988 cc) 221 kW (300 PS; 296 bhp) 380 N⋅m (280 lb⋅ft) Manual (6) 5.1 seconds (4.9) 275 km/h (171 mph) 168 g/km
PDK (7) 4.9 seconds (4.7) 275 km/h (171 mph) 158 g/km
PDK Sport Chrono (7) 4.7 seconds (4.5) 275 km/h (171 mph) 158 g/km
2.5L (2497 cc) 257 kW (349 PS; 345 bhp) 420 N⋅m (310 lb⋅ft) Manual (6) 4.6 seconds (4.4) 285 km/h (177 mph) 184 g/km
PDK (7) 4.4 seconds (4.2) 285 km/h (177 mph) 167 g/km
PDK Sport Chrono (7) 4.2 seconds (4.0) 285 km/h (177 mph) 167 g/km
2017 2.5L (2497 cc) 269 kW (366 PS; 361 bhp) 430 N⋅m (317 lb⋅ft) Manual (6) 4.6 seconds (4.4) 290 km/h (180 mph) 205 g/km
PDK (7) 4.3 seconds (TBA) 290 km/h (180 mph) 186 g/km
PDK Sport Chrono (7) 4.1 seconds (3.9) 290 km/h (180 mph) 186 g/km

Motorsport[edit]

718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport[edit]

On 3 January 2019 the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport was unveiled in two variants, Competition and Trackday, with first customer cars delivered to customer teams ahead of the 2019 Roar Before the Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona International Speedway. The race car is powered by a 3.8-litre naturally-aspirated flat-six engine producing 425 PS (419 bhp; 313 kW) at 7,500 rpm and 425 N⋅m (313 lb⋅ft) at 6,600 rpm connected to a 6-speed PDK gearbox. The kerb weight is 1,320 kg (2,910 lb). Both variants feature a welded-in roll cage, a six-point harness and race bucket seat, a selection of body parts made of natural-fibre composite materials, the front suspension from the 911 GT3 Cup, racing brakes, lightweight forged wheels and slick tyres. Aerodynamics are improved over the previous generation GT4 Clubsport, including a swan neck mount rear wing. The Competition variant features 3-way adjustable shock absorbers, a 115-litre fuel cell, brake balance adjustment, a lightweight battery, a fire extinguishing system, a quick release steering wheel from the 911 GT3 R and a three-piston air jack system while the Trackday variant features fixed shock absorbers, a 80-litre fuel cell and a handheld fire extinguisher instead.[23]

R-GT[edit]

A version of the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport built to FIA R-GT regulations has been announced as planned for the 2020 season.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Porsche (19 August 2016). "The new 718 models in detail – Design". Retrieved 14 October 2017 – via YouTube.
  2. ^ "The new 718 Boxster - Technical Specs". porsche.com.
  3. ^ "The new 718 Cayman - Technical Specs". porsche.com.
  4. ^ "The new 718 Boxster S - Technical Specs". porsche.com.
  5. ^ "The new 718 Cayman S - Technical Specs". porsche.com.
  6. ^ "The new 718 Boxster GTS - Daten & Austattung". porsche.com.
  7. ^ "The new 718 Cayman GTS - Daten & Austattung". porsche.com.
  8. ^ "Press Release: Boxster and Cayman now to be marketed as 718 model series". porsche.de.
  9. ^ "Porsche 718 - Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG". Porsche 718 - Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  10. ^ "Press Release: The new mid-engine roadster with four-cylinder engines: Porsche 718 Boxster". porsche.de.
  11. ^ "Press Release: Four-cylinder turbo for power when cornering – the new Porsche 718 Cayman". porsche.de.
  12. ^ "Press Release: Tailored for design and sportiness – the new Porsche 718 GTS models". porsche.de.
  13. ^ Car Solutions (6 June 2016), Quick Look at Porsche PCM 4.0, retrieved 5 February 2018
  14. ^ Riswick, James (October 2016). "2016 Porsche Boxster vs. 2017 Porsche 718 Boxster: What's the Difference?". Auto Trader.
  15. ^ "Porsche 718 Cayman". 13 January 2015. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  16. ^ "Porsche 718 Cayman S: 2nd Place - 2017 Motor Trend Best Driver's Car - Motor Trend". Motor Trend. 20 September 2017. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  17. ^ "2017 Porsche 718 Cayman S PDK Test – Review – Car and Driver". Car and Driver. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  18. ^ "Porsche 718 Cayman S review". www.topgear.com. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  19. ^ Motor Trend Channel (11 September 2017), 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman S: Better Than Ever, But What’s That Sound? - Ignition Ep. 180, retrieved 5 February 2018
  20. ^ MotorWeek (2018-01-05), 2018 Porsche 718 Boxster & Cayman GTS | First Drive, retrieved 2018-06-06
  21. ^ Driven Car Reviews (2018-05-22), 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS, retrieved 2018-06-06
  22. ^ "Porsche 718 Cayman GTS review". evo.co.uk. Evo. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  23. ^ "New Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport featuring natural-fibre body parts". presse.porsche.de. Porsche. Retrieved 2019-04-10.
  24. ^ "Near-standard rally vehicle complying with R-GT regulations planned - Demo run for the Porsche Cayman GT4 Rallye on snow and ice". presse.porsche.de. Porsche. Retrieved 2019-04-10.