Portal:Rhythm and blues

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Wikipedia's Rhythm and Blues Portal

Introduction

Rhythm and blues, abbreviated as R&B, is a genre of popular music that originated in African American communities in the 1940s. The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular. In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, one or more saxophones, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy, as well as triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, economics, and aspirations.

The term "rhythm and blues" has undergone a number of shifts in meaning. In the early 1950s, it was frequently applied to blues records. Starting in the mid-1950s, after this style of music contributed to the development of rock and roll, the term "R&B" became used to refer to music styles that developed from and incorporated electric blues, as well as gospel and soul music. In the 1960s, several British rock bands such as the Rolling Stones, the Who and the Animals were referred to and promoted as being R&B bands; posters for the Who's residency at the Marquee Club in 1964 contained the slogan, "Maximum R&B". Their mix of rock and roll and R&B is now known as "British rhythm and blues". By the 1970s, the term "rhythm and blues" changed again and was used as a blanket term for soul and funk. In the 1980s, a newer style of R&B developed, becoming known as "contemporary R&B". It combines rhythm and blues with elements of pop, soul, funk, disco, hip hop, and electronic music. Popular R&B vocalists at the end of the 20th century included Prince, Stevie Wonder, Chaka Khan, Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, and Mariah Carey. In the 21st century, R&B has remained a popular genre, becoming more pop-oriented and alternative-influenced, with successful artists including Beyoncé, Rihanna, Chris Brown, Ne-Yo, Bruno Mars, SZA, Robin Thicke, Amir Tataloo, and The Weeknd.

Selected article

"Baby Boy" is a song recorded by American singer Beyoncé featuring Jamaican dancehall singer Sean Paul from Beyoncé's debut solo studio album Dangerously in Love (2003). Both artists co-wrote the song with Scott Storch, Robert Waller and Shawn "Jay-Z" Carter; the former also co-produced the song. Containing a lyrical interpolation of "No Fear" by hip hop group O.G.C, "Baby Boy" is an R&B and dancehall song with Caribbean and Asian influences; its lyrics detail a woman's fantasies.

Columbia Records and Music World Entertainment released "Baby Boy" as the second single from Dangerously in Love on August 3, 2003. "Baby Boy" topped the US Billboard Hot 100 for nine consecutive weeks and was Beyoncé's longest-running solo number-one single until 2007, when it was surpassed by "Irreplaceable". It reached the top ten in many countries and was certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It also reached the top 10 in Australia, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

The song's music video was directed by Jake Nava and mostly shows Beyoncé dancing in various locations. "Baby Boy" has remained a staple of Beyoncé's concert set lists. The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) recognized it as one of the most performed songs of 2004. In 2005, American singer-songwriter Jennifer Armour filed a copyright infringement lawsuit claiming that the song had used the primary musical hook from her song "Got a Little Bit of Love for You". The suit was later dismissed.

Selected image

Patti LaBelle
Author: Clh288
Picture Notes: Rhythm and blues musician Patti LaBelle singing at the memorial service for Space Shuttle Columbia. At the Feb. 6 memorial service for Columbia, Patti Labelle sang "Way Up There", a song commissioned by the NASA Art Program to celebrate the Centennial of Flight in 2003. The song was written by Tena R. Clark.

Selected biography

Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name Nina Simone (IPA: ninɐ sʌmɞnɑ) (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was a Grammy Award-nominated American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger and civil rights activist.

Although she disliked being categorized, Simone is generally classified as a jazz musician. She preferred the term "Black Classical Music" herself. Simone originally aspired to become a classical pianist, but her work covers an eclectic variety of musical styles besides her classical basis, such as jazz, soul, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop music. Her vocal style (with a rich alto vocal range[1]) is characterized by intense passion, breathiness, and tremolo. Sometimes known as the High Priestess of Soul, she paid great attention to the musical expression of emotions. Within one album or concert she could fluctuate between exuberant happiness or tragic melancholy. These fluctuations also characterized her own personality and personal life, worsened by a bipolar disorder with which she was diagnosed in the mid-sixties, but was kept secret until 2004.[2]

Simone recorded over 40 live and studio albums, the biggest body of her work being released between 1958 (when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue) and 1974. Songs she is best known for include "My Baby Just Cares for Me", "I Put a Spell on You", "I Loves You Porgy", "Feeling Good", "Sinner Man", "To Be Young, Gifted and Black", "Strange Fruit", "Ain't Got No-I Got Life" and "I Want a Little Sugar in My Bowl". Her music and message made a strong and lasting impact on African-American culture[3], illustrated by the numerous contemporary artists who cite her as an important influence (among them Mary J. Blige, Alicia Keys, Jeff Buckley, and Lauryn Hill), as well as the extensive use of her music on soundtracks and in remixes.

Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina, one of eight children. She began playing piano at her local church and showed prodigious talent on this instrument. Her concert debut, a classical piano recital, was made at the age of ten. During her performance, her parents, who had taken seats in the front row, were forced to move to the back of the hall to make way for white people. Simone refused to play until her parents were moved back.[4][5] This incident contributed to her later involvement in the civil rights movement.

Selected sound

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  1. ^ Brun-Lambert. Nina Simone, het tragische lot van een uitzonderlijke zangeres. p. 57.
  2. ^ Hampton. Break Down And Let It All Out. pp. 9–13.
  3. ^ Mark Anthony Neal (2003-06-04). "Nina Simone: She Cast a Spell—and Made a Choice". Retrieved 2007-08-14.
  4. ^ Simone. I Put a Spell on You. p. 26.
  5. ^ Hampton. Break Down And Let It All Out. p. 15.