RAF Harrowbeer

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RAF Harrowbeer

Air Force Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Royal Air Force Fighter Command, 1939-1945. CH9017.jpg
Aircraft and personnel required for a WWII Air/Sea rescue operation
Summary
Airport typeMilitary
OwnerAir Ministry
OperatorRoyal Air Force
LocationYelverton, Devon
Built1940
In use1941-1950
Coordinates50°29′27″N 004°05′36″W / 50.49083°N 4.09333°W / 50.49083; -4.09333Coordinates: 50°29′27″N 004°05′36″W / 50.49083°N 4.09333°W / 50.49083; -4.09333
Map
RAF Harrowbeer is located in Devon
RAF Harrowbeer
RAF Harrowbeer
Location in Devon
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
11/29 3,840 1,171 Asphalt
17/35 3,345 1,020 Asphalt
05/23 2,736 834 Asphalt
Operating dates.[1]

RAF Harrowbeer is former Royal Air Force airfield situated next to Yelverton in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, Devon England

Location[edit]

RAF Harrowbeer was located approximately 9 miles (14 km) NNE of the city of Plymouth and approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Tavistock, and also sits within the boundary of Dartmoor National Park. Roborough Rock is a tor-like igneous rock outcrop immediately south-west of the airfield (officially called 'Udal Tor') on Roborough Down, next to the border with the A386.[2] This location created problems for the airfield during the Second World War, mainly due to bad weather. The Rock seems to have had little impact on the use of the Airfield, the only thing that was done by the RAF was the placing of a warning light on the top. There seems to be no truth in the widely-held belief that the RAF attempted to blow it up.[2]

Although sited near the village of Yelverton, it was called 'Harrowbeer' in order to distinguish it from the similar-sounding RNAS Yeovilton which had recently changed its name from HMS Heron when the Airfield opened on the 15th August 1941. The airfield was under the control of No. 10 Group RAF and was never assigned a station badge.

The former Ravenscroft School became the officers' mess.[3]

Based units[edit]

The airfield opened in May 1941. It closed following the end of World War II.[4][5]

A large number of units used the airfield at some point, such as:

Other units[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Harrowbeer". Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  2. ^ a b "The Rock, Yelverton". Educational Register of Geological Sites. Devon County Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 July 2012.
  3. ^ RAF HARROWBEER YELVERTON Miscellaneous Information
  4. ^ "The History of RAF Harrowbeer" Retrieved on 7 November 2008
  5. ^ a b c d e "Harrowbeer". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 28 April 2012.
  6. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 23.
  7. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 33.
  8. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 45.
  9. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 58.
  10. ^ a b Jefford 1988, p. 59.
  11. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 65.
  12. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 66.
  13. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 67.
  14. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 80.
  15. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 81.
  16. ^ a b Jefford 1988, p. 82.
  17. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 84.
  18. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 86.
  19. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 87.
  20. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 90.
  21. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 94.
  22. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 99.
  23. ^ a b Jefford 1988, p. 100.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Jefford MBE, Wg Cdr C G (1988). RAF Squadrons. A comprehensive record of the movement and equipment of all RAF squadrons and their antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury: Airlife. ISBN 1-85310-053-6.

External links[edit]