Talk:Charles Wheatstone

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Sources[edit]

Much of this text originally came from the book Heroes of the Telegraph by John Munro, available at Project Gutenberg: [1]. Lupo 14:03, 12 Aug 2004 (UTC)

Much of this also appears to have been lifted from: http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/~eugeniik/history/wheatstone.html
Comapre the first sentances of this entry with the first sentances from the huji site: "Charles Wheatstone was born on 6 February 1802, at Barnwood Manor House, Barnwood, near Gloucester. His father was a music-seller in the town, who, four years later, moved to 128, Pall Mall, London, and became a teacher of the flute. He used to say, with not a little pride, that he had been engaged in assisting at the musical education of the Princess Charlotte." - 140.98.210.243 15:40, 21 September 2005 (UTC)
kaleidophone instead of kaleidoscope -- on friday, 11th of august 2006 i found the 'kaleidoscope' mentioned as an invention of wheatstone - an obvious mistake, as it was the 'kaleidophone' he invented. see more info i.e. http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/iss/library/speccoll/host/wheatstone.html
there is a lot of trustable info on wheatstone's relation to music and musical instruments online; i'd suggest to add at least some of these sites to the link list - 85.180.181.2 19:04, 11 August 2006 (UTC)
The text you quoted is from Heroes of the Telegraph, a public domain project gutenberg etext, as cited above. It just so happens that other cites have also copied from the etext and have not been as diligent as Wikipedia in attributing their sources. -- Gmaxwell 18:05, 23 October 2006 (UTC)

The article looks as if large portions have been copied from elsewhere, particularly since there seems to be no one person who has been actively editing it over a long period of time. I hope that it has not been copied, since having to sift through what is original and what is not isn't a task that will attract new participants. - Astrochemist (talk) 12:30, 13 March 2008 (UTC)


Five Needle Telegraph[edit]

The five needle telegraph could display 20 letters, leaving out D-J-Q-U-X-Z.

Tabletop (talk) 03:27, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

I'm related to him[edit]

It goes Charles Wheatstone Pablo Wheatstone Louise F Wheatstone Dennis Dillon Shallard Pamela Dillon Shallard Oliver Nicklin Me!!!!!!!!!!

Plagarism[edit]

I've added a template to the "Life" section about copying and pasting because I found the same context at another website here: http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/history/wheatstone.html I'm guessing Wikipedia copied it from them, and not vice versa because the web page does not include a reference pointing to Wikipedia. --TheWikiOctopus 01:56, 24 March 2009 (UTC)

Wheatstone's concertina[edit]

Hello, In this article http://www.culture24.org.uk/history+%2526+heritage/literature+%2526+music/art72225 a curator from the Horniman Museum discusses Wheatstone's concertinas in detail. Would it be appropriate to add a citation link to this article from the paragraph about his development of the concertina? Disclaimer: I work at Culture24. I'd be interested to hear what people think. Thanks, RosieClarke (talk) 15:26, 23 November 2009 (UTC)

Further work on telegraphs[edit]

In this section (and others) there is text that is probably a quote, but which is not shown as such, eg ". . In the Postal Telegraph service this apparatus is employed for sending Press telegrams, and it has recently been so much improved, that messages are now sent from London to Bristol at a speed of 600 words a minute, and even of 400 words a minute between London and Aberdeen."193.113.48.7 (talk) 09:33, 14 May 2010 (UTC)

Most of the article is copied from a public domain book, as it states. Dicklyon (talk) 07:17, 15 May 2010 (UTC)

Velocity of electricity[edit]

On 22 August, several paragraphs regarding the velocity of electricity were inserted. I'm taking them out because they have no bearing on the life of Charles Wheatstone. They discuss events which occurred after Wheatstone's death.

Moreover, these paragraphs amount to defense of a distinctly unconventional theory of electrodynamics. Several items in these paragraphs are either meaningless, or flat wrong, according to the generally accepted laws of physics. So that's another reason to take them out. —Preceding unsigned comment added by CarlFeynman (talkcontribs) 01:07, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

Automatic transmitter patented in 1858[edit]

Hi,

According to The Victorian Internet, Wheatstone "patented an automatic sender" in 1858 — ISBN-13: 978-0-8027-1604-0; page: 190. The corresponding paragraph in Further work on telegraphs could be presented earlier and not like his last action upon telegraphy.

Lacrymocéphale 20:07, 4 June 2013 (UTC)