Talk:Free-range eggs

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Untitled[edit]

The Photo http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Eggess.JPG is terribly bad and should imo be removed --77.177.157.233 12:59, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

{{globalize}}[edit]

I tagged the article with {{globalize}} because in the current revision [1] one of the sentence states:

However, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has not instituted a legal standard on what free range eggs actually mean, thus allowing egg producers to freely label, in theory, any egg as free range eggs.

This obviously and naturally begs for adding information about legal standards for free-range eggs in other countries/nations etc. 131.107.0.81 01:12, 29 June 2006 (UTC)

I've now added a lot with respect to globalising the article - it now covers a lot of EU legislation. Bethgranter (talk) 13:17, 15 April 2009 (UTC)


If you want a worldview on the subject, why not have official documents obstained from various countries. I'd really like to see what every country's standards when it comes to poultry eggs.24.3.150.95 (talk) 05:46, 2 March 2012 (UTC)

In Australia, Free-Range means poultry left freely to roam outside, with portable shade/nesting houses that workers move as the paddocks are rotated. If they are raised In a barn that's Barn-Laid eggs, in Cages, obviously Caged Eggs. I think this article should have a section for each major country in a 'Legal Definition' section — Preceding unsigned comment added by 112.213.186.65 (talk) 8:33 AEST July 24th, 2013

Nutritional Content[edit]

I added a header and adjusted the wording a bit regarding nutrition claims for free-range vs conventional eggs. The references for making health claims are pretty poor quality but they are better than nothing for now... —Preceding unsigned comment added by Iconia (talkcontribs) 16:52, 6 December 2007 (UTC)

Australian Regulations[edit]

Hello, I am about to remove the sentence in the lead paragraph saying that in Australia strict regulations define what are free range eggs - on 13 June 2008 Barrylb added a citation needed tag saying 'please cite the Australian regulations' - this hasn't been done, and as far I can discern from credible sources - the ABC's Landline[2] program, and the RSPCA[3] - it is completely untrue to say there are strict regulations in Australia - it would appear that whilst there may be definitions of what constitutes adequate space for battery-laid egg chickens (i.e. not free range), i) they are state-by-state, not federal laws, ii) which are reportedly regularly flouted and, most importantly iii) 'free-range' is not adequately defined in any legislation: Landline says "The free-range industry in Australia is self-regulated and there is no compulsory national accreditation system", and that, as at 2006, only two free-range producers in Australia were accredited by the RSPCA. The wikipedia editor who entered this sentence has had more than adequate time to cite a reference, so I will delete it. Thanks, SeventhHell (talk) 06:35, 8 June 2009 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 10:59, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Photo of "free-range hens"[edit]

It looks like a photo of barn hens with the lights on. Is it correct? 84.13.29.241 (talk) 22:33, 2 March 2010 (UTC)

Completely agree. The photo appears to be an illustration of barn egg production. While 'free range' production isn't as idyllic as many consumers think, this plant couldn't be so described under EU rules (it appears to be very heavily stocked even for the barn egg rules.) Possibly the pic is of a US 'free range' plant, as the term is pretty much meaningless there. In any case clarification is needed. --Ef80 (talk) 12:22, 14 February 2011 (UTC)

Free range eegs.This morning i had eegs 1 out of 5 had green whites but all yolks where nice and orange anyone know why? —Preceding unsigned comment added by LES COVEY (talkcontribs) 18:39, 21 October 2010 (UTC)

The photo was most likely taken in the UK. Rules are made to be broken over there. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.32.41.88 (talk) 01:27, 22 October 2012 (UTC)