Talk:Hadal zone

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Food falling from above[edit]

What about hydrothermal vent eco-systems. I thought the whole thing about the hadal zone is that it doesn't end up getting any of that food, so any organisms living down there are probably getting energy directly or indirectly from hydrothermal vents. Brentt 20:42, 30 September 2006 (UTC)

The pelagic zone article explains this better. In fact, I'm surprised that this article isn't merged into that one. It's mostly redundant. Afalbrig 10:54, 10 October 2006 (UTC)
I think this article could easily justify it's existance if it were expanded, perhaps by an expert. It should at least be marked as a stub. --Xanthine 10:04, 23 January 2007 (UTC)
Sortof. Life in the hadal zone is limited by the extremely poor nutrient availability. This lack of food, _not_ the hostile conditions with extreme pressure and cold, is the reason biomass is so low down there (species diversity is probably high, though poorly explored). Hydrothermal vents are like oases, with rich life due to the abundance of nutrients, but the effect is extremely local. The same is true with other sources of food, e.g. whale falls, and the vast bulk of nutrition for hadal organisms consists of "marine snow", ie copepod poop. The Man On The Street (talk) 19:33, 13 August 2010 (UTC)

Depth off slightly?[edit]

'The most accurate measurement on record was taken by a Japanese probe, Kaikō (かいこう), which descended unmanned to the bottom of the trench on March 24, 1995 and recorded a depth of 10,911 meters (35,798 ft).' Mariana Trench But here it says the deepest depth is 35,800 ft, What one is True and could they both be fixed? I think rounding it up is rather messy, I would assume Mariana's Depth is more accurate and correct, But it would need comformation. NekoKiyo (talk) 10:39, 16 July 2008 (UTC)

I went ahead and changed it NekoKiyo (talk) 13:18, 21 July 2008 (UTC)

Organisms from this zone will die in the zones where pressure is lower.[edit]

A narrative hook. Why do they die? Is the pressure such that chemistry behaves differently, in cell membranes etc? I'm discounting the idea that it is becuase it is very difficult to bring them up and they die of the metaphenomena. Midgley (talk) 09:15, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

A very few bacteria from the hadal zone need pressure to function, presumably because the pressure alters the chemical properties of their proteins; I'll add a link. Normally, however, deep-sea organisms die when brought to the surface because they are adapted to a low and extremely stable temperature, and even a very small temperature change can kill them. The Man On The Street (talk) 10:35, 26 October 2013 (UTC)

I've removed the text: Organisms from this zone will die in the zones where pressure is lower.[1] I could have simply changed it to Some organisms.. but the reference seems to be mostly referring to the effects of rapid decompression. In fact it says that some types of bacteria do survive rapid decompression. And many living things can adapt to changing pressure, given time. I think it's probably best to just leave it out altogether. nagualdesign (talk) 05:34, 7 December 2013 (UTC)

Is pressure such a bad thing?![edit]

The article states that, "The intense pressure and the lack of light create hostile living conditions." Lack of light is a fair point, but what has pressure got to do with it? Sure, if you take a land lubber like me down to 20,000m I'll get squished like a bug, but there's nothing intrinsically hostile about pressure, and there are organisms that thrive at these depths. I think it's a silly statement and I'd remove it.. but.. I may be mistaken, and I'd love for somebody to tell me why exactly. nagualdesign (talk) 04:10, 5 December 2013 (UTC)

Hades[edit]

Correct me if I am off here, but Hades, in Greek Mythology, is the name of the ruler of the Greek underworld, not the name of the underworld itself.


PinothyJ (talk) 04:14, 4 February 2015 (UTC)…

  1. ^ Death of a Hadal Deep-Sea Bacterium After Decompression. February 1, 2007.