Talk:Internet censorship in Iran

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youtube and wikipedia etc. are not blocked here. Stop lying you Jews.--85.185.144.251 10:32, 29 August 2007 (UTC)

I am not of any particuar ethnic group, but as of today, I observed those sites to be indeed heavily filtered. Also lots of references on google, e.g., CNet Report on censoring and proxies in Iran PotatoEater (Does this resolve the multiple issues on the article?) (talk) 11:32, 17 May 2010 (UTC)

Haystack Network[edit]

The Haystack Network is a project headed by Austin Heap to make a program capable of getting around the blocks. http://www.haystacknetwork.com/ Kevin chen2003 (talk) 22:36, 24 July 2009 (UTC)

Almost a year after the above msg, this project seems still vaporware. No download buttons on that site.
Another tool, one that I have seen using in an internet cafe, is Ultrasurf, but google shows many sources indicating that it is a trojan. As an aside, the search term Ultrasurf is blocked in Iran for google, wikipedia, etc. PotatoEater (talk) 12:11, 17 May 2010 (UTC)

dont recall where i read this but they claimed they werre distributing it by usb stiicks to avoid reverse engineering th tables — Preceding unsigned comment added by Conspiritech (talkcontribs) 06:24, 14 June 2013 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Filter internetcafe.jpg[edit]

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BetacommandBot 12:55, 1 October 2007 (UTC)

Iranian Blacklist[edit]

Is there anyway to obtain the list of sites that Iran is blacklisting? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Scirocco6 (talkcontribs) 17:35, 14 April 2008 (UTC)

I have seen the filter change several times over a three-week period. At one point, en.wikipedia.org was added to the filter. Later, en.wikipedia.org was accessible again, but specific keywords where filtered, such as Ultrasurf. Also, such keywords are now filtered on all search machines. There is no such thing as a defined list of blacklisted sites. PotatoEater (talk) 12:18, 17 May 2010 (UTC)

Two-way censorship[edit]

While the iranian government filters the incoming internet (censorship), America (Europe?) applies Export Restrictions towards e.g., Iran. Sourceforge refuses to download to Iranians, see their apology.

As a foreign traveller, I was not able to obtain updates for McAfee while in Iran. As a registered user from outside Iran, an update would not even constitute an export to Iran.

This seems in violation to the free character of Open Source. They seem to bow very very fast to the demands of the US government, while the NY Times recently reported that 74 major companies blatantly ignore that same law, and that in 30 years no single company was ever penalized for it.

On the other hand, in Iran you can buy in every shop and restaurant Coca Cola, Fanta etc, bottled in Teheran with a license of the Coca Cola company. Just an example of the many US products normally available in Iran.

I really think all this boycott stuff is junk. US/Europe wants Free Trade, then a boycott is not logical. Also, the intent of the boycotts are to influence the Iranian government to change policies towards the demands of the US, but which sane mind can imagine a government to say 'ouf, our internet users cannot download from Sourceforge (or buy a spare part for our 30-year old boeing plane) , now we really have to change our policies on (atomic bomb / head scarfs / whatever).' In fact, the only real reason I can think of for the boycott is to actually keep the regime more firm in place so that the US military industry will not lose business. PotatoEater (talk) 12:45, 17 May 2010 (UTC)

Internet censorship in Iran[edit]

The second para of the introduction states "In November 2006, Iran was one of thirteen countries labeled 'enemies of the internet' by activist group Reporters Without Borders.[1] In March 2010, it was one of three regimes so labeled.[7]". The second link, pointing to an article dated 11 March 2010, no longer works. A Reporters Without Borders article of 18 March 2010 states, "The 'Enemies of the Internet' list drawn up again this year by Reporters Without Borders presents the worst violators of freedom of expression on the Net: Saudi Arabia, Burma, China, North Korea, Cuba, Egypt, Iran, Uzbekistan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, and Vietnam.". I've corrected the number of 'enemies of the internet' from three to twelve, and replaced the old (broken) link. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Oniscoid (talk)

proxy servers[edit]

serversi think it is silly to assign all outbound proxy servers on earth to the US

Punishments[edit]

I don't see a list of punishments enforced on citizens for violating Iranian internet censorship, by illegal postings etc. This article doesn't seem to link to it if it exists somewhere else. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 5.102.205.122 (talk) 08:29, 3 December 2013 (UTC)

Here are some quotes that may help:
From the "Iran country report" in Freedom on the Net 2013 by Freedom House:[1]
  • Finally, numerous activists and ordinary Iranians remained in prison, while many more were detained over the past year. The brutality of the security forces is well-known, and this year the death of blogger Sattar Beheshti caused outrage after it was exposed over social media.
  • Iranian internet users suffer from routine surveillance, harassment, and the threat of imprisonment for their online activities, particularly those critical of the authorities and among the members of ethnic and religious minorities.
  • The 2000 Press Law, for example, forbids the publication of ideas that are contrary to Islamic principles or detrimental to public rights, none of which are clearly defined.[73] The government and judiciary regularly invoke this and other vaguely worded legislation to criminalize critical opinions. The 2009 Computer Crime Law (CCL) identifies punishments for spying, hacking, piracy, phishing, libel, and publishing materials deemed to damage “public morality” or to be a “dissemination of lies.” [74] Punishments mandated in the CCL are severe. They include the death penalty for offenses against public morality and chastity, as well as long prison sentences, draconian fines, and penalties for service providers who fail to enforce government content restrictions. Numerous users were arrested over the coverage period and, in the gravest violation of user rights, blogger Sattar Beheshti was killed while in police custody.
  • Since June 2009, the authorities have cracked down on online activism through various forms of judicial and extralegal intimidation. An increasing number of bloggers have been threatened, arrested, tortured, kept in solitary confinement, and denied medical care, while others have been formally tried and convicted. Four individuals—Saeed Malekpour (a web developer), Mehdi Alizadeh Fakhrabad (web developer), Vahid Asghari (blogger and IT student), and Ahmad Reza Hashempour (website designer)—were sentenced to death between October 2011 and January 2012 under extremely questionable circumstances on charges relating to insulting religion or conspiring with foreign enemies. Malekpour, for example, was prosecuted on charges of “insulting and desecrating Islam” because a software program he had designed was used to upload pornography, although it was done without his knowledge.[75] Numerous bloggers remain in prison and are currently serving prison terms of up to 20 years, including Hossein Ronaghi-Maleki and Hossein Derakhsan, considered the father of the Iranian blogosphere.
  • Dr. Mehdi Khazali, a dissident blogger, ophthalmologist, and director of a publishing house, was arrested on October 30, 2012 during a meeting of the writers association Saraye Ghalam (Pen Society). Dr. Khazali has been arrested multiple times for fiercely criticizing President Ahmadinejad. Ironically, he is also the son of Ayatollah Khazali, a leading conservative cleric, though they have differing political views. After a 140-day hunger strike, he was finally released on June 3, 2013. Kaveh Taheri, a blogger from Shiraz, Iran, was arrested on September 23, 2012 for acting against national security and disseminating online propaganda against the government. As of March 2013, he remained in detention pending any formal trial.
  • Ahmad Shariat, who runs the conservative blog Nedaee az Daroon, was arrested on July 22, 2012 after publishing a post critical of the Revolutionary Guards and Iran’s judiciary system.
  • The father of an Iranian student in the Netherlands was also arrested for his son’s satirical posts on Facebook. The authorities threatened the son that if he does not return to Iran, his father will be executed. Finally, Iman Amiri, an internet security student at Malmo University in Sweden, was arrested on January 21, 2013 upon returning to Iran. He is now in detention at Evin Prison and was reportedly subject to torture to force a confession. Numerous other dissidents who are active online were arrested in late 2012 and early 2013, although many of their cases relate more strongly to their offline activities.
From Reporters Without Borders entry for Iran on their "Enemies of the Internet" list:[2]
  • Sentenced to death for their online activities This is the first time that netizens have been sentenced to death. On January 29, 2012, the Iranian Farsnews agency, with close ties to the Guardians of the Revolution, confirmed the sentencing to death of Web developer Saeed Malekpour, a permanent resident of Canada, for “anti-government agitation” and “insulting Islam.”
  • In early 2012, Iran’s Supreme Court also confirmed the death sentence for IT student Vahid Asghari and website administrator Ahmadreza Hashempour. The Revolutionary Court’s Fifteenth Chamber informed Web developer and humorist Mehdi Alizadeh that he had been sentenced to death.
  • These four netizens, who are between 25 and 40, are victims of a plot orchestrated by the Center for the Surveillance of Organized Crime, an entity created illegally in 2008 by the Revolutionary Guards. Under torture, the accused admitted having links with websites that criticize Islam and the Iranian government, and to having intended to “mislead” Iranian youth by distributing pornographic content. They were also forced to confess to participating in a plot backed by the United States and Israel.
  • Reporters Without Borders counted 29 netizen arrests between March 1, 2011 and March 1, 2012. Eleven netizens received sentences ranging from three to six years. Fifteen were released on parole. They are awaiting their trial and verdict with little hope for leniency.
  • In February 2012, Mehdi Khazali, son of an influential conservative religious leader, was sentenced to four years in prison for regularly posting criticisms of the Iranian president on his blog.
  • Sakhi Righi, whose blog is balochistan-s, was arrested on June 18, 2009 in his native city of Zahedan. His prison sentence was the harshest one ever served on a blogger in Iran – 20 years – for “publishing false information” and committing ”acts against national security.”
From the "Iran country report" in the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012 from the U.S. Department of State:[3]
  • The government prosecuted and punished several bloggers and Web masters for peaceful expression of dissenting views. According to AI, in the run-up to the March 2 legislative elections, authorities arrested at least 12 journalists and social media activists, while the BBC Persian service confirmed that the government was continuing to pressure its employees by taking family members of its London-based staff hostage. For example, on January 20, police arrested Mohammad Soleimani-Nia, the founder of social media Web site u24 and developer of several domestic NGO Web sites. He was reportedly imprisoned without charge, pressured to help develop the national Intranet, and released on May 22 on 40 million tomans ($32,630) bail. RSF reported police rearrested Soleimani-Nia May 28 and released him August 13 on 500 million tomans ($407,830) bail. On January 17, MOIS officials reportedly arrested Tabriz News Web site editor Peyman Pakmehr on national security charges, transferred him to Evin Prison, and released him on January 24 on 220 million tomans ($179,450) bail.
  • There were no updates in the previous year’s case of journalist and blogger Siamak Ghaderi, who reportedly remained imprisoned at year’s end after being sentenced in January 2011 to four years in prison on charges of “propaganda against the regime” for participating in and reporting on public gatherings.

  1. ^ "Iran country report", Freedom on the Net 2013, Freedom House. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
  2. ^ "Iran", Enemies of the Internet list, Reporters Without Borders, 12 March 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  3. ^ "Iran", Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
It would be good to include a summary of this information in the article. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 09:37, 3 December 2013 (UTC)

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