Talk:Shemen Afarsimon

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Discovery[edit]

In April, 1988 an excavation team from the Vendyl Jones Research Institute (VJRI) discovered a juglet of oil in the Qumran area. Professor Jones believes the oil to be none other than the oil that was used in the Holy Temple.

After intensive testing by the Pharmaceutical Department of Hebrew University, financed by VJRI, the substance inside the small juglet was verified to indeed be the Shemen Afarshimon of Psalm 133.

According to Jones, the finding of the oil was important for two reasons. It is the first item to be found from the First Temple Period and is one of the items listed among the treasures in the Copper Scroll.

On February 15, 1989, the news of the find was broken to the public by the New York Times newspaper. During the ensuing few weeks, most major news media institutions, ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN, carried the story on national and international television. In October, 1989, National Geographic Magazine featured the find, followed by Omni Magazine in December of the same year. Countless other news sources carried the story for their publications.

I removed this from the article it is a verbatim copy from http://www.vendyljones.org.il/anointingoil.htm

Chikanamakalaka 08:32, 4 March 2007 (UTC)